Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 16, 2019


Is quantum computing scalable?
Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb.
Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution
While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a Penn State materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem.
Art Institute of Chicago unveils key findings in African art thanks to medical technology
On Feb. 16, the Art Institute of Chicago announced the results of significant new research on five terracotta sculptures -- so named Bankoni after a village in present-day Mali where they were found.
Predicting climate change
Thomas Crowther, ETH Zurich identifies long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world.
Political and policy feedbacks in the climate system
Matto Mildenberger, University of California Santa Barbara explains how perceived experiences with climate change in the United States can be linked to political shifts in Congress, culture and society.
Diagnosing 'art acne' in Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings
A multidisciplinary team from Northwestern University and the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico has diagnosed the strange paint disease causing Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings to deteriorate.
Large-scale window material developed for PM2.5 capture and light tuning
A research team from University of Science and Technology of China develops a simple and economical process to fabricate large-scale flexible smart windows.
How to feed the world by 2050? Recent breakthrough boosts plant growth by 40 percent
Recent advances to address hunger through agricultural discovery will be highlighted at this year's annual meeting of the AAAS.
Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic targets in stable ischemic heart disease
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, C.
Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions
Researchers at Aalto University have developed new metasurfaces for the arbitrary manipulation of reflected waves, essentially breaking classical reflection law to engineer it at will.
How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?
Just as conservators have developed methods to protect traditional artworks, computer scientists, in collaboration with time-based media conservators, have created means to safeguard computer- or time-based art by following the same preservation principles.
Drinking contexts associated with early onset of alcohol intoxication among adolescents
New research by scientists at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation has begun to identify these circumstances by examining relationships between early age of first intoxication (less than 15 years), drinking in different contexts such as one's own home, at friends' homes, or outdoor settings, and problems that arise in those contexts.
Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy
Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician.
Drug combination may become new standard treatment for advanced kidney cancer
A combination of two drugs -- one of them an immunotherapy agent -- could become a new standard, first-line treatment for patients with metastatic kidney cancer, says an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial.
Contemporary management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Radmila Lyubarova, Joshua Schulman-Marcus and William E.
Stable ischemic heart disease in the older adult
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Juan R.
Diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Cody Schwartz and David Winchester from the Malcom Randall VAMC, Gainesville, Fla., USA consider diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.