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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 17, 2019


Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture
Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new Duke University-led research.
There's a place for us: New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems
In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb.
Northwestern study of analog crews in isolation reveals weak spots for Mission to Mars
Researchers are developing a predictive model to help NASA anticipate conflicts and communication breakdowns among crew members and head off problems that could make or break the Mission to Mars.
Indigenous hunters have positive impacts on food webs in desert Australia
Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction in the world.
Smoking may limit body's ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer
Melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive their skin cancer than people who have never smoked, according to a new report funded by Cancer Research UK.
Virus-infected bacteria could provide help in the fight against climate change
Understanding the relationship between microbes and viruses is beneficial not only for medical research and practical applications but also in marine biology, says Alison Buchan, Carolyn W.
A hidden source of air pollution? Your daily household tasks
Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city.

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