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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 20, 2019


Computer simulators show how to reduce damage to lungs of children in intensive care
Changing the ventilation settings for children on life support can reduce the risk of damage to their lungs, researchers at the University of Warwick and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have found on computer simulated patients.
New method identifies which asthma patients respond to systemic corticosteroids
Physicians will be able to predict which of their patients with severe asthma are likely to benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids -- and which might only suffer their side effects -- with help from a dozen clinical variables researchers have identified using machine learning techniques, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Report says health systems are key to improving cancer outcomes in the United States
A new report says without a national investment and commitment to transforming health care delivery in the United States, many people will not benefit from the substantial progress made against cancer.
Vigorous exercise, fasting, hormones improve elimination of toxic, misfolded, unnecessary proteins in mouse and human cells
A new study shows vigorous exercise and fasting improve the ability of human and mouse cells to remove misfolded, toxic, unnecessary proteins.
The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record
The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published Feb.
Researchers peer inside the mind of the worm for clues on how memories form
Study lays the ground for uncovering the molecular basis of memory blocking that has baffled scientists for decades.
Interacting with more people is shown to keep older adults more active
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that older adults who spend more time interacting with a wide range of people were more likely to be physically active and had greater emotional well-being.
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Wutip organizing
Tropical Depression 02W has organized and strengthened into a tropical storm.
New AI able to identify and predict the development of cancer symptom clusters
Cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy could soon benefit from a new AI that is able to identify and predict the development of different combinations of symptoms -- helping to alleviate much of the distress caused by their occurrence and severity.
The holy grail of nanowire production
EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces.
Health-related Google searches doubled in week before ER visits
Patients are often willing to share their Google search histories with medical researchers, revealing that many people do searches on their condition well before deciding to go to the hospital.
Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth
A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary,' has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the University of Nottingham.
Combining morning exercise with short walking breaks helps control blood pressure in older overweight/obese adults, especially in women
Treadmill walking for 30 minutes in the morning lowered average blood pressure over an eight-hour day among older, overweight or obese men and women.
Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot
New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot.
Cocktail of common antibiotics can fight resistant E. coli
Scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability have discovered that a combination of two common antibiotics is able to eliminate multi-drug resistant E. coli causing urinary tract infections.
Life-changing magic of tidying up: Complex structures' organization studied in slime mold
Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a complex, multicellular body.
Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents
Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research by University of Sydney and the NSW Poisons Information Centre.
Can a nerve injury trigger ALS?
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are the first to demonstrate that a peripheral nerve injury can trigger the onset and spread of the disease in an animal model of ALS.
Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeat
Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm.
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a US team from Baylor University.
Cold-temperature variability important in evaluating climate change
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, highlights the importance of considering cold temperature variability, and not just warming temperatures, when evaluating the impact of climate change.
New method to detect cancer cells faster, potentially improving outcomes
A new Purdue University technique to analyze proteins expressed on cancer cells shows promise in more rapidly detecting these cell types in patients.
The new exercise trend that's made for everyone
Bringing the science of high intensity interval training (HIIT) into everyday life could be the key to helping unfit, overweight people get more of the exercise they need to improve their health, according to an international research team.
Plants: How cell walls are assembled
Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants.
Genetic blueprint for extraordinary wood-munching fungus
The first time someone took note of Coniochaeta pulveracea was more than two hundred years ago, when the South African-born mycologist Dr Christiaan Hendrik Persoon mentioned it in his 1797 book on the classification of fungi.
New therapeutic strategy to treat Alzheimer's
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) have identified a potential therapeutic strategy to treat Alzheimer's, according to a study published in Journal of Neuroscience.
Antibody therapy training phagocytes to destroy tumors now tested on patients
Developed by researchers at the University of Turku in Finland, an immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill cancer.
Do improvements in sexual functioning after weight-loss surgery last?
Short-term improvements in sexual functioning have been reported after weight-loss surgery but not much is known about whether these improvements last.
Putting data privacy in the hands of users
MIT and Harvard University researchers have developed Riverbed, a platform that ensures web and mobile apps using distributed computing in data centers adhere to users' preferences on how their data are shared and stored in the cloud.
Peer support, healing hands may curb prescription opioid misuse
A program offering group support, acupuncture, mindfulness, massage and gentle exercise may help prevent patients on prescription opioids from spiraling down to drug misuse, overdose and death, according to a study led by researchers at UCSF.
Rice University researchers unveil Internet of Things security feature
Rice University integrated circuit designers will present a new approach for creating secure keys and IDs on Internet of Things (IoT) devices at this week's 2019 International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco.
Keeping active in middle age may be tied to lower risk of dementia
Keeping physically and mentally active in middle age may be tied to a lower risk of developing dementia decades later, according to a study published in the February 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Russian researchers made gold nano-stars for intracellular delivery
Researchers from Russian Academy of Sciences developed a new method for star-shaped nanoparticles synthesis based on laser irradiation.
Study finds melanoma brain metastases are immunosuppressive with treatment-resistant metabolism
Melanoma tumors that have spread to the brain are equipped to thwart immunotherapies and targeted therapies that succeed against tumors growing in other sites.
Zebra stripes are not good landing strips
The stripes of a zebra deter horse flies from landing on them, according to a new study published Feb.
Scientists identify unique subtype of eczema linked to food allergy
Atopic dermatitis, also known as allergic eczema, affects nearly 20 percent of children, 30 percent of whom also have food allergies.
Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio report their insights into how colors are generated on heated metal surfaces and apply those findings to create a nickel thin-film that perfectly absorbs red light.
For patients with schizophrenia, some drug combinations may be more effective than others
Patients with schizophrenia are often treated with more than one type of psychiatric medication, but a new study suggests that some combinations may be more effective than others.
Study finds way to potentially improve immunotherapy for cancer
A new study has identified a drug that potentially could make a common type of immunotherapy for cancer even more effective.
New compound could help treat ovarian cancer
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a compound that could be more effective in treating certain cancers than standard chemotherapy.
Simulated ocean mesoscale structures induce air-sea interaction
Using the Community Earth System Model framework, the authors build a very high-resolution quasi-global coupled model by coupling an eddy-resolving quasi-global ocean model with a high-resolution atmospheric model.
Complete world map of tree diversity
Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have succeeded in constructing, from scattered data, a world map of the diversity of tree species.
Evening exercise will not ruin sleep and might even reduce appetite
With growing time demands, many middle-aged adults are finding time to engage in exercise increasingly difficult.
Is guideline-recommended therapy for coronary artery disease more likely in Medicare Advantage?
Medicare Advantage is Medicare's managed-care alternative to traditional fee-for-service Medicare.
New therapeutic approach to combat African sleeping sickness
Scientists working in a range of disciplines joined forces to identify a new approach to combat African sleeping sickness.
Tracking cholera in a drop of blood
A multi-institutional, international team of researchers has developed a method that identifies individuals recently infected with Vibrio cholerae O1.
Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists
An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals.
Delhi's complicated air pollution problem
According to the World Health Organization, Delhi is the world's most polluted large city.
The 'blue' in blueberries can help lower blood pressure
A new study published in the Journal of Gerontology Series A has found that eating 200g of blueberries every day for a month can lead to an improvement in blood vessel function and a decrease in systolic blood pressure in healthy people.
Extinguishing fear memories relies on an unusual change to DNA
Researchers at The University of Queensland have discovered a DNA modification that enhances our ability to extinguish fear.
Lack of sleep is not necessarily fatal for flies
Male flies kept awake do not die earlier than those allowed to sleep, leading researchers to question whether sleep, in flies at least, is essential for staying alive.
Advances in naturopathy research reported in new special issue of JACM
Naturopathy, or 'naturopathic medicine' as the profession is branded in the United States, is a rapidly growing profession and scientifically advancing form of practice that can have a positive impact on a wide variety of chronic and complex conditions.
A volcanic binge and its frosty hangover
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history -- the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago.
Researchers find genetic clues to high rates of asthma in those of African ancestry
In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of the human genome associated with the higher rates of asthma in those of African ancestry.
Lesbian and bi women at increased risk of being overweight
Lesbian and bisexual women are at increased risk of being overweight or obese compared to heterosexual women.
Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.
Water is more homogeneous than expected
In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases even under ambient conditions.
Viruses that linger in the gut could trigger type 1 diabetes
Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, provide new evidence supporting an association between elevated levels of enteroviruses in the intestinal tracts of children and islet autoimmunity, a precursor to type 1 diabetes.
New 'smart drug' shows promise for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer
A clinical trial at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia and other centers found that patients responded to a new 'smart drug' for women with an aggressive form of breast cancer.
An intricate interaction: dietary fatty acid intake influences hypertension risk
Hypertension is an important public health problem that can lead to life-threatening cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke.
Light at the end of the tunnel
A new nationally representative study reports that approximately two-thirds (69 percent) of Canadians who had ever attempted suicide were completely free of any suicidal thoughts in the past year.
Johns Hopkins researchers define cells used in bone repair
Research led by Johns Hopkins investigators has uncovered the roles of two types of cells found in the vessel walls of fat tissue and described how these cells may help speed bone repair.
Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce
Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a Kansas State University family studies researcher.
Researchers discover a flipping crab feeding on methane seeps
Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia -- one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.
Salt could be a key factor in allergic immune reactions
Salt apparently affects allergic immune reactions. A team working with Professor Christina Zielinski at the Technical University of Munich has demonstrated in cell cultures that salt leads to the formation of Th2 cells.
Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold?
Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials.
Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's
The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants.
A scientific method for perfect fondue
Cheese fondue is an icon of Swiss cuisine and a dinner party staple.
Earth may be 140 years away from reaching carbon levels not seen in 56 million years
Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth's last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds.
Mega experiment shows species interact more towards tropics and lowlands
One of the largest field experiments ever conducted is providing the best evidence yet in support of a key Darwinian theory -- that interactions between species are stronger toward the tropics and at lower elevations.
Mandarin Chinese could help us understand how infants learn English
Infants may be more sensitive to non-native speech sounds than previously thought, according to a study published in the Journal of Memory and Language.
The smell of food controls cellular recycling and affects life expectancy
The smell of food affects physiology and aging. That is the result of research conducted on the model organism of the roundworm by a research team led by Professor Thorsten Hoppe at the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD).
'Butterfly-shaped' palladium subnano cluster built in 3-D
A Japanese research team at The University of Tokyo produced a 3-D cluster molecule based on palladium.
Scientists identify genetic mechanism involved in how females inherit traits
Female cells randomly and permanently shut off one of the X chromosomes during embryonic development through a process called X chromosome inactivation, or XCI.
Activating tooth regeneration in mice
Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime.
NIST physicists 'flash-freeze' crystal of 150 ions
Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have 'flash-frozen' a flat crystal of 150 beryllium ions (electrically charged atoms), opening new possibilities for simulating magnetism at the quantum scale and sensing signals from mysterious dark matter.
Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development
A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development.
Seen for the first time: Golden snub-nosed monkeys nurse other females' infants
More than 87 percent of golden snub-nosed monkey infants evaluated in a five-year field study were nursed by females other than their mothers -- a phenomenon called allomaternal nursing.
New insight into river flows and sediment transport under ice cover
The ice-covered season plays an important role in the development of river channels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
Yea, team! Winning fans see self-esteem boost
Fans of a college football team that wins a big game could experience a boost in self-esteem that lasts at least two days after the event, a new study suggests.
As genetic data expand, researchers urge caution in how predictors of education outcomes are used
In a review published online today in AERA Open, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, researchers from Stanford University and the University of Cambridge warn that -- as the predictive power of genes tied to learning and educational outcomes increases and access to genetic data expands -- researchers, educators, and policymakers must be cautious in how they use such data, interpret related findings, and, in the not-too-distant future, apply genetics-informed student interventions.
Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes
The study, conducted at the Center for Mind/Brain sciences at the University of Trento, Italy, shows that small involuntary eye movements, independent of any response, can be used to determine whether one has successfully learned.
Xeno/endobiotic metabolism potencies vary between strains and sex in rats
Rats are used commonly in nonclinical drug-development studies (DDS). Miki Nakajima and colleagues at Kanazawa University (Kanazawa, Japan) quantified hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression of uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugt) isoforms in rats.
New insight on potent HIV antibody could improve vaccine design
A new observation, led by researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute, highlights the importance of previously unstudied mutations that arises early in bnAbs, giving the antibodies the flexibility to adapt to changes in the virus's outer envelope protein structure.
Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery
A careful re-analysis of data taken at DOE's Jefferson Lab has revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery.
Development of nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz
Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology.
Despite America's protein craze, adults are still missing the mark according to new study
Research reveals more than 1 in 3 Americans 50+ aren't meeting the recommended protein intake and it's saying a lot about their diets and health Timing matters -- eating protein evenly throughout the day, and even before bedtime, can support muscles for optimal health
How zebra stripes disrupt flies' flight patterns
Scientists learned in recent years why zebras have black and white stripes -- to avoid biting flies.
When does one of the central ideas in economics work?
Many situations in economics are complicated and competitive; this research raises the question of whether many theories in economics may suffer from the very fundamental problem that the key behavioral assumption of equilibrium is wrong.
Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell
A new study by researchers at the Allen Discovery Center at UW Medicine has traced animportant period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse.
Risks of shoulder replacement surgery higher than previously thought
The risks associated with shoulder replacement surgery for arthritic conditions are higher than previously estimated, particularly for people under 60 and over 85 years old, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
Ingredients for water could be made on surface of moon, a chemical factory
When a stream of charged particles known as the solar wind careens onto the moon's surface at 450 kilometers per second (or nearly 1 million miles per hour), they enrich the moon's surface in ingredients that could make water, NASA scientists have found.
Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine
A frosty mug of beer or ruby-red glass of wine just wouldn't be the same if the liquid was murky or gritty.
Nitisinone increases melanin in people with albinism
A small pilot clinical study at the National Eye Institute (NEI) suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA-1B), a rare genetic disease that causes pale skin and hair and poor vision.
CASSINI Trial publishes data on preventing blood clots in cancer patients
The first clinical study investigating the use of the direct oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, to prevent blood clots in patients with cancer at high-risk published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Study of quark speeds finds a solution for a 35-year physics mystery
MIT physicists now have an answer to a question in nuclear physics that has puzzled scientists for three decades: Why do quarks move more slowly inside larger atoms?
New study: How to save a seabird
A new study outlines more than a decade of success in reducing seabird bycatch in Alaska's longline fisheries, and where there's still room for improvement.
Bat influenza viruses could infect humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus.
Antibody-drug conjugate shows promise against metastatic triple-negative breast cancer
Treatment with the experimental drug sazituzumab govitecan produced a significant treatment response in patients with difficult-to-treat metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.
Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut
A new study in mice shows dietary fiber promotes the aggregation of gut particles.
Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity
Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says.
Drug 'librarian' discovers new compound that may thwart common surgery complication
In a strategic search, Johns Hopkins scientists created and screened a library of 45,000 new compounds containing chemical elements of widely used immune system suppressants, and say they found one that may prevent reperfusion injury, a tissue-damaging and common complication of surgery, heart attack and stroke.
People with osteoporosis should avoid spinal poses in yoga, Mayo Clinic study says
Yoga postures that flex the spine beyond its limits may raise the risk of compression fractures in people with thinning bones, according to research from Mayo Clinic.
Ecosystem responses to dam removal complex, but predictable
In the United States, the removal of dams now outpaces the construction of new ones -- with more than 1,400 dams decommissioned since the 1970s -- and a new study suggests that the ecosystem effects of dam removal can be predicted.
Young bone marrow rejuvenates aging mouse brains, study finds
A new study has found that transplanting the bone marrow of young laboratory mice into old mice prevented cognitive decline in the old mice, preserving their memory and learning abilities.
Crocodile face off
Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles.
NASA-NOAA satellite looks at large-eyed Tropical Cyclone Oma
Tropical Cyclone Oma is a large hurricane with a big eye.
Women with a strong social support network may be at lower risk for heart disease
Having good friends can save your life, as a study based on data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) demonstrates how strong social support may reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in postmenopausal women.
EEG helps scientists predict epileptic seizures minutes in advance
Study shows that acetate, an acid found in some foods, may help doctors intervene when seizures are imminent.
How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities
A new study uses environmental, socioeconomic and management data from 30 Caribbean islands to identify which communities may be most at risk from the social and ecological effects of coral bleaching, which occurs when warm water causes coral polyps to expel algae living in their tissue.
A deeper look at the relationship between dermatitis and food allergy, in pediatric patients
Researchers have discovered that food allergies are associated with distinct abnormalities in seemingly-healthy skin in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), a common skin disorder.
Small benefit of inducing labor over 'wait and see' approach for late-term pregnancies
Inducing labor at 41 weeks of pregnancy leads to a small reduction in birth complications compared with expectant management (a 'wait and see' approach) until 42 weeks in low risk women, finds a clinical trial published by The BMJ today.
Silver linings come from partner support, research says
Spouses can help breast cancer patients with coping by positively reframing the cancer experience and other negative experiences.
Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world
Capsicum is a major vegetable and spice crop worldwide. Global production of both fresh and dried fruit continues to increase steadily in terms of area harvested and total yield.
New tool for tracking cholera outbreaks could make it easier to detect deadly epidemics
Algorithms using data from antibody signatures in peoples' blood may enable scientists to assess the size of cholera outbreaks and identify hotspots of cholera transmission more accurately than ever, according to a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Student likeability might be link between academic success and risk of depression
A new study suggests that children doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically.
Tools to help seriously ill patients near death make decisions about their care aren't commonly used in routine practice
Many seriously ill people in the United States -- and around the world -- are not dying as they would like.
Genetic study seeks to prevent foodborne infection caused by Salmonella
Project presented at FAPESP Week London identifies genes that allow bacteria to survive in the digestive tract of poultry and thus infect humans.
Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa
Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird -- the now extinct adzebill -- showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.
A prosthetic that restores the sense of where your hand is
Researchers have developed a next-generation bionic hand that allows amputees to regain their proprioception.
Artificial intelligence can identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol
A first-of-its kind study has demonstrated that an artificial intelligence technique can be used to identify trauma patients who misuse alcohol.
For adult scoliosis, surgery, other treatments are viable options
A study of adults with the spinal deformity known as lumbar scoliosis determined that the most important factor in determining whether to do surgery is the extent of a patient's disability, as well as how much that disability interferes with day-to-day life.
UBC researchers discover how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation
Researchers from the University of British Columbia have discovered how blood vessels protect the brain during inflammation -- a finding that could lead to the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis.
Penn State's Habitable Zone Planet Finder enables discovery of planets around cool stars
A new astronomical spectrograph provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, allowing astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our solar system.
Russian physicists trained the oscillatory neural network to recognize images
Physicists from Petrozavodsk State University have proposed a new method for oscillatory neural network to recognize simple images.
Researchers develop new compound that offers superior therapeutic approach to treat MS
Previous studies have shown that estrogens and estrogen-like compounds reduce multiple sclerosis-like inflammation and disability in mice.
Coastal waters are unexpected hotspots for nitrogen fixation
Nitrogen fixation is surprisingly high in the ocean's coastal waters and may play a larger role than expected in carbon dioxide uptake, a new Duke-led study shows.
AI may be better for detecting radar signals, facilitating spectrum sharing
In a new paper, NIST researchers demonstrate that deep learning algorithms -- a form of artificial intelligence -- are significantly better than a commonly used method for detecting when offshore radars are operating, which can potentially improve certain spectrum-sharing operations.
New blood test may map fetal genome for countless mutations
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy.
Firearm homicide rate higher in US counties with greater income inequality
Counties in the United States with greater gaps between rich and poor have a higher rate of homicide deaths involving firearms, according to a national study by researchers at the University of Washington School of Public Health.

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