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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 23, 2019


Immunotherapy for egg allergy may allow patients to eat egg safely long after treatment
After completing up to four years of egg oral immunotherapy (eOIT) treatment, certain participants were able to safely incorporate egg into their diet for five years.
Likelihood of tick bite to cause red meat allergy could be higher than previously thought
The original hypothesis was that humans developed the red meat allergy after being exposed to the alpha-gal protein through a tick that had fed previously on a small mammal.
Exclusive breastfeeding lowers odds of some schoolchildren having eczema
Children exclusively breastfed for the first three months of life had significantly lower odds of having eczema at age 6 compared with peers who were not breastfed or were breastfed for less time, according to preliminary research presented during the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2019 Annual Meeting.
Nanoparticle computing takes a giant step forward
Inspired by how cellular membranes process biological information, we developed a platform for constructing nanoparticle circuits on a supported lipid bilayer.

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