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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | February 25, 2019


For young adult cancer survivors, debt and work-related impairments
One of the largest-ever studies of work-related risks in young adult cancer survivors finds that of 872 survivors, 14.4 percent borrowed more than $10,000 and 1.5 percent said they or their family had filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of illness or treatment.
Better options needed for children at higher risk of premature heart disease
New developments in identifying and treating the increased risk of premature heart disease in children and teens with certain medical conditions associated with increased cardiovascular risk are discussed in a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.
Patients' HIV status should not impact their cancer care
New articles published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, note that there is no medical justification to deny optimal cancer therapy to individuals with HIV.
Artificial lung cancer tissue could help find new drug treatments
A 3D hydrogel created by researchers at U of T Engineering is helping University of Ottawa researchers to quickly screen hundreds of potential drugs for their ability to fight highly invasive cancers.
130,000 years of data show peatlands store carbon long-term
An international team of scientists has become the first to conduct a study of global peatland extent and carbon stocks through the last interglacial-glacial cycle 130,000 years ago to the present.
New targets for ischemic drugs found
Russian scientists investigated the role of opioid receptors in protecting the heart from coronary disease: the lack of its blood supply.
Fat cells work different 'shifts' throughout the day
Fat cells in the human body have their own internal clocks and exhibit circadian rhythms affecting critical metabolic functions, new research in the journal Scientific Reports, finds.
Lack of diversity in cell lines prevents minorities from accessing 'precision medicine'
As the biomedical field races to develop therapies based on an individual's genetic makeup, a City of Hope scientist and his colleagues found that some commercial cell lines used for countless laboratory studies have mislabeled ancestry when it comes to minorities.
People with chronic pain are coping with the help of Pinterest, new study reveals
A new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University that analyzed 502 posts on Pinterest about chronic pain revealed that the social media platform is helping people with chronic pain cope by sharing self-care and pain-management tips, venting about their pain's severity, and supporting others who are similarly suffering.
Material that shields beetle from being burned by its own weapons, holds promise
Carabid beetles produce caustic chemicals they spray to defend themselves against predators, and the compound that protects their bodies from these toxic substances shows promise for use in bioengineering or biomedical applications, according to Penn State researchers.
Early life stress alters helping behavior of meerkat offspring
Parents make sacrifices to allow their children to have better lives than they did, but this isn't the case for Kalahari meerkat mothers, according to a new University of Michigan study.
Oregon research team helps complete genome of Antarctic blackfin icefish
An international team has unveiled the genome of the Antarctic blackfin icefish, opening a genetic window on fish that evolved over the last 77 million years to survive in temperatures below the freezing point of freshwater.
Origin of resistance to lung-cancer drug discovered
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications what causes some lung-cancer patients to have an intrinsic resistance to the drug osimertinib: AXL, a protein belonging to the class of receptor tyrosine kinases.
How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick.
Breakthrough 'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster, cheaper and less invasively
A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.
Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues
Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world.
Ancient rocks provide clues to Earth's early history
A research team led by scientists at Arizona State University has provided compelling evidence for significant ocean oxygenation before the GOE, on a larger scale and to greater depths than previously recognized
Wild carnivores stage a comeback in Britain
Once-endangered carnivorous mammals such as otters, polecats and pine martens have staged a remarkable comeback in Britain in recent decades, a new review shows.
Estrogen made by neurons important to making memories
Estrogen in the brain is important to keep neurons communicating and memories being made, scientists report.
Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of 2 species of ancient reptile
Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.
Stellar wind of old stars reveals existence of a partner
Red giants are old stars that eject gaseous material and solid particles through a stellar wind.
Study finds ultrasound can assess bone health, increase early screening for osteoporosis
The findings could lead to lower costs and increased screening for populations at-risk for bone diseases, which study authors say extends well beyond postmenopausal women.
How genetic background shapes individual differences within a species
Study reveals how genetic background influences trait inheritance laying the grounds for predicting personal risk of disease.
What was effect of offering breakfast in the classroom on obesity?
Offering breakfast in the classroom at some Philadelphia public schools did not affect the proportion of students developing overweight and obesity, when examined as a combined measure, after 2.5 years.
High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones
A team of engineers in the McKelvey School of Engineering has developed a high-powered fuel cell that operates at double the voltage of today's commercial fuel cells.
Researchers ID gene that may predict pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes
Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a gene called ''UCP-1'' that may predict the development of pancreatic cancer in people with Type 2 diabetes.
Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds
According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change.
A gene involved in ADHD could be related to addictive substance use
Some variations in the gene LPHN3-associated with the attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids and adults -- could favor likelihood to smoke, consume alcohol, cannabis and other addictive substances, according to an article published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, from the Nature Publishing Group.
Mini tumors could help identify personalized treatments for people with rare cancers
UCLA scientists have developed a new method to quickly screen hundreds of drugs in order to identify treatments that can target specific tumors.
Researchers discover 'chromosome scanner' that protects against cancer
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified one of the main mechanisms behind the repair of serious damage to the human DNA.
Is the most effective weight-loss strategy really that hard?
Dietary self-monitoring is the best predictor of weight-loss success. But the practice is viewed as so unpleasant and time-consuming, many would-be weight-losers won't adopt it.
Report cards show continued sea-level rise on East & Gulf coasts
Interactive plots provide annual sea-level projections to 2050 for 32 localities along the US coastline from Maine to Alaska.
Boost for Australian grain industry
New findings from research by La Trobe University and CSIRO made possible with GRDC investment could lead to a significant increase in the Australian wheat crop yield -- adding potentially around $1.8 billion to the national economy and improving global food security.
Mothers with children taken into out-of-home care at risk of poor prenatal care in next pregnancies
Mothers whose first child was taken into care were found to have inadequate or no prenatal care during subsequent pregnancies, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
CO2 emissions in developed economies fall due to decreasing fossil fuel and energy use
Efforts to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and tackle climate change are beginning to pay off according to research led by the Tyndall Centre at the University of East Anglia.
Elucidation of molecular-targeted drug resistance mechanism by lung cancer cells
We revealed that ALK-positive lung cancer cells, treated with crizonitib, a molecular target drug, acquired resistance to the drug not only by genetic mutation but also by concomitant epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT).
Physicists from ITMO University experimentally investigated new class of resonators
The physicists from ITMO University, Ioffe Institute and the Australian National University examined a new mechanism of realization of high-quality optical resonators.
Most laptops vulnerable to attack via peripheral devices, say researchers
Many modern laptops and an increasing number of desktop computers are much more vulnerable to hacking through common plug-in devices than previously thought, according to new research.
Pink or brown?
They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown.
An easier way to engineer plants
MIT researchers have developed a genetic tool that could make it easier to engineer plants that can survive drought or resist fungal infections.
ADHD drug Ritalin has no effect on primate prefrontal cortex
In contrast to studies of mice and rats, new research published in eNeuro investigating the effect of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on neuronal activity in monkeys has found no effect of the drug on the prefrontal cortex.
Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today
Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture.
New study shows red raspberries may help with glucose control in people with pre-diabetes
A study released today from the Illinois Institute of Technology shows the benefits of including red raspberries in the diet of individuals with pre-diabetes and insulin resistance.
A new sequencing method to detect DNA modifications of relevance to cancer
Ludwig Cancer Research scientists report in the current issue of Nature Biotechnology a new and improved method to detect chemical modifications to DNA.
Fetal growth inhibited by cocktail of chemicals in the mother
For the first time, researchers have shown that a combination of perfluorinated substances in the mother significantly inhibits child growth.
Money-savers focus attention -- and eyes -- on the prize
Why can some people patiently save for the future, while others opt for fewer dollars now?
A disconnect between migrants' stories and their health
While some Mexican immigrants give positive accounts about migrating to and living in the United States, their health status tells a different story.
Documenting and decoding the dynamics between work and pain
Workers suffering from chronic pain takes an immense toll on both employees and employers.
Google translates doctor's orders into Spanish and Chinese with few significant errors
In multicultural areas like San Francisco, doctors are increasingly looking to Google Translate to provide written instructions their patients can take home, so they stand a better chance of following medical advice.
New chimpanzee culture discovered
Different cultures, different habits and different behavioral patterns -- this applies not only to humans but also to chimpanzees, one of our two closest living relatives.
Urban parks could make you happier
UAB researchers found spending 20 minutes in an urban park will make someone happier -- whether they are engaging in exercise or not during the visit.
Study outlines targeted treatment option for aggressive breast cancer
New findings outline a targeted therapeutic strategy to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) -- a potential first for the particularly aggressive form of breast cancer.
New study shows use of medication abortion rebounded in Texas after FDA label change
Proportion of medication abortion plummeted after House Bill 2, bounced back after FDA label change on abortion medication mifepristone.
You probably don't have a penicillin allergy
Two McMaster University physicians have five facts about penicillin allergy published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).
A very human machine
Researchers have designed a neural probe that looks, acts, and feels so much like a real neuron that the brain cannot identify the imposters.
Belief in conspiracy theories makes people more likely to engage in low-level crime
People who believe in conspiracy theories -- such as the theory that Princess Diana was murdered by the British establishment -- are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity.
Scientists lay foundation for single-cell level understanding of DNA replication
A research team established a novel method to scrutinize DNA replication in individual cells.
Study: Political parties sideline minority voters, leave other orgs to pick up the slack
Political parties sideline minority voters, and leave other organizations to pick up the slack.
Amazon forest can be trained by higher rainfall variability
The Amazon rainforest has evolved over millions of years and even through ice ages.
Breakthrough shines light on disease-fighting protein
A combination of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy assisted in a collaborative effort to obtain the highest-resolution structure of the fungal protein Hsp104, which may serve to hinder the formation of certain degenerative diseases.
High CO2 levels can destabilize marine layer clouds
Computer modeling shows that marine stratus clouds could disappear if atmospheric CO2 levels climb high enough, raising global temperatures.
Entangling photons of different colors
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a novel way to entangle two photons--one with a wavelength suitable for quantum-computing devices and the other for fiber-optics transmissions.
Face it. Our faces don't always reveal our true emotions
When it comes to reading a person's state of mind, visual context -- as in background and action -- is just as important as facial expressions and body language, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley.
Insomnia-associated gene regions suggest underlying mechanisms, treatment targets
An international research team led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 57 gene regions associated with symptoms of insomnia.
An educational program designed to lessen the risk of falls in children
The programme Safe Fall- Safe Schools© establishes a methodology that is suitable for different ages of students, centred on progression by levels and types of fall (backwards, sideways and forwards), in which the child, goes from being a passive to an active participant.
Key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA silencing Argonaute enzyme unveiled
The Argonaute (Ago) enzyme complex plays a critical role in DNA and RNA target cleavage for a process known as RNA silencing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, making them a target for future gene-editing technology.
Laser drill leads to world record in plasma acceleration
Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US have set a new world record for plasma accelerators: In a plasma tube only 20 centimetres long, the team led by Wim Leemans, then head of the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center and now Accelerator Director at DESY, accelerated electrons to an energy of 7.8 billion electron volts (GeV).
Younger Americans much more likely to be arrested than previous generations
One possible byproduct of the of the nation's zero-tolerance criminal justice policies may be a trend that finds that Americans under the age of 26 are much more likely to be arrested than Americans born in previous decades.
Simplified method makes cell-free protein synthesis more flexible and accessible
Researchers have radically simplified the method for cell-free protein synthesis, a technique that could become fundamental to medical research.
Faced with choice overload, Indian farmers say, 'I'll have what he's having'
After the Indian government liberalized its economy, shops stocking a previously controlled market of public agricultural goods were suddenly flooded with new private brands.
International team of scientists detect cause of rare pediatric brain disorder
An international effort led by physician-scientists at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM), in collaboration with a team at the Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MCH-MUHC), has identified the cause of a devastating pediatric brain disorder paving the way for the first step in developing potential therapies for this rare neurodegenerative condition.
With nanotubes, genetic engineering in plants is easy-peasy
Genetically modifying plants requires gene guns or bacteria to carry DNA into the cell, but the success rate is low.
It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles
In a paper published Feb. 25 in the journal Nature, a University of Washington-led team of physicists report that they have developed a new system to trap individual excitons -- bound pairs of electrons and their associated positive charges.
Uncovering the origins of cultivated strawberries
In a new study published in Nature Genetics, researchers now unveil how the strawberry became an octoploid, as well as the genetics that determine important fruit quality traits.
Predicting how forests in the western US will respond to changing climate
On the mountain slopes of the western United States, climate can play a major role in determining which tree communities will thrive in the harshest conditions, according to new work from Carnegie's Leander Anderegg and University of Washington's Janneke Hille Ris Lambers.
A reward now or later? Exploring impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients
Promises of food, sums of money or entertaining pastimes: it does not matter what the temptation is, a new study shows that patients suffering from Parkinson's disease who are treated with DBS of the subthalamic nucleus are not more impulsive than others when making decisions about an appealing stimulus.
Health literacy can promote older people's health
A new study on older Finnish people's health literacy found that one third of 75-year-old Finns find it difficult to understand and use health-related information.
A new spin in nano-electronics
In recent years, electronic data processing has been evolving in one direction only: the industry has downsized its components to the nanometer range.
Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger
A previously unknown messenger which alarms nearby cells when the immune system recognises a bacterial or viral infection has been uncovered.
Discovery of colon cancer pathway could lead to new targeted treatments
University of Massachusetts Amherst food science researchers have pinpointed a set of enzymes involved in tumor growth that could be targeted to prevent or treat colon cancer.
The importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention, treatment of heart failure in women
There are many important differences between women and men with heart failure, highlighting the importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention and treatment, according to three papers publishing today in JACC: Heart Failure.
Manipulating gene expression in neurons with CRISPR
Neuroscientists have used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to regulate genes in the rat brain.
New NASA mission could find more than 1,000 planets
A NASA telescope that will give humans the largest, deepest, clearest picture of the universe since the Hubble Space Telescope could find as many as 1,400 new planets outside Earth's solar system, new research suggests.
New microfluidics device can detect cancer cells in blood
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Queensland University of Technology of Australia, have developed a device that can isolate individual cancer cells from patient blood samples.
Partners in catalysis: An efficient route to unsaturated ketones
A Japanese research team at Kanazawa University synthesized diverse β,γ-unsaturated ketones through direct reaction of aldehydes and allylic alcohols.
Super Typhoon Wutip's 25 mile-wide eye seen by NASA-NOAA satellite
Tropical Cyclone Wutip has strengthened into a powerful super typhoon and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snapped a visible image of the storm that revealed a clear eye.
Discovery improves understanding of Lou Gehrig's disease
Researchers uncovered a novel player in the development of ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease: mutated ubiquilin proteins that cause ALS fail to regulate the function of lysosomes, a key 'waste disposal and recycling center' of the cells.
Fewer hospital programs address opioid abuse, Ohio University study finds
The damage done to America's health by the opioid epidemic is well-recognized and enormous, with drug overdose death rates helping to drive down US life expectancy in recent years.
Elevation matters when it comes to climate change, deforestation and species survival
A study examining the impact of deforestation on lizard communities in the Dominican Republic demonstrates differing outcomes at different elevations.
Regaining independence after hip fracture -- age is the most important predictor
Most middle-aged and older adults recover their ability to live independently within a year after surgery for hip fracture, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.
New study reveals when a superconductor truly becomes super
A research team including Jianshi Zhou from UT Austin has confirmed the existence of a phase transition in copper-oxide-based (or cuprate) superconductors.
Working long hours linked to depression in women
Women who work more than 55 hours a week are at a higher risk of depression but this is not the case for men, according to a new UCL-led study with Queen Mary University of London.
Be yourself at work -- It's healthier and more productive
At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley.
Brain cells involved in insomnia identified
An international team of researchers has identified, for the first time, the cell types, areas and biological processes in the brain that mediate the genetic risk of insomnia.
Old stars live longer than we thought
The type of stars we refer to, which cannot be seen by the naked eye, officially up to now the objects which have suffered the greatest loss of mass.
New skeletal disease found and explained
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new and rare skeletal disease.
Non-native pest-controlling wasp identified in Canada prior to formal approval
Thought to be Canada's most promising potential defense against the brown marmorated stink bug (a globally spreading pest of various fruits and vegetables), the samurai wasp has been considered for future release in the country in recent years.
UVA discovers secret to making immune cells better cancer killers
Scientists have discovered a defect in immune cells known as 'killer T cells' that explains their inability to destroy cancer tumors.
Graphite offers up new quantum surprise
Researchers at The University of Manchester in the UK, led by Dr.
Over half of home health care clinicians say they lack adequate information from hospitals
A survey of Colorado home health care clinicians (HHCs) revealed that 60 percent said they had not received enough information to guide patient treatment while 52 percent said patients often had unrealistic expectations of the kind of care they would receive.
Common virus is 'less prone to mutation' giving hope for vaccine development
One of the commonest causes of congenital disability, the Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is less prone to mutation than previously thought, a finding which could help develop a successful vaccine, UCL researchers have found.
Unprecedented biological changes in the global ocean
Current monitoring of marine biological systems only covers a tiny fraction of the ocean, which limits our ability to confidently predict the expected effects of climate disturbances on marine biodiversity.
Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create own living space on plant
Grape phylloxera -- the insect that nearly wiped out wine production at the end of the 19th century in France -- hijacks a grape vine's reproductive programs to create a leaf gall, which it uses as a pseudo apartment for the parasite to siphon off the plant's nutrients.
Researchers identify possible role of Foxp1 protein in control of autoimmune diseases
Scientists at the Higher School of Economics, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IBCh RAS), and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center created a genetic model that helps to understand how the body restrains autoimmune and oncological diseases.
Rare cancers: A growing focus of early-stage clinical trials
The proportion of early-stage drug trials tackling the biggest cancer killers has declined sharply since the early 1990s as less common tumour types receive increasing attention, according to new research to be presented during the International Congress on Targeted Anticancer Therapies (TAT) 2019, taking place Feb.
Giant animals lived in Amazonian mega-wetland
Lake systems existing in regions over 10 million years ago survived the Amazon River reversal due to Andean uplift.
Breeding a better strawberry
An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits.
Some personal beliefs and morals may stem from genetics
Penn State researchers found that while parents can help encourage their children to develop into responsible, conscientious adults, there is an underlying genetic factor that influences these traits, as well.
Identifying barriers to care for women with endometriosis
An expert review by a Society for Women's Health Research working group identifies areas of need in endometriosis to improve a woman's diagnosis, treatment, and access to quality care.
Migrants face a trade-off between status and fertility
Researchers from the universities of Helsinki, Turku and Missouri as well as the Family Federation of Finland present the first results from a new, extraordinarily comprehensive population-wide dataset that details the lives of over 160,000 World War II evacuees in terms of integration.
Laser 'drill' sets a new world record in laser-driven electron acceleration
Combining a first laser pulse to heat up and 'drill' through a plasma, and another to accelerate electrons to incredibly high energies in just tens of centimeters, scientists have nearly doubled the previous record for laser-driven particle acceleration at Berkeley Lab's BELLA Center.
Avoiding the crack of doom
The deformations and fractures that cause catastrophic failure in materials begin with a few molecules torn out of place, a process of urgent interest to researchers.
New clues about why non-smokers, as well as smokers, develop chronic lung disease revealed
A group of researchers led by the universities of Leicester and Nottingham has discovered genetic differences that put some people at higher risk than others of developing chronic lung disease.
The secret behind witchweed's devastating ability to steal nutrients from crops
Commonly known as 'witchweed,' the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica devastates crops in sub-Saharan Africa.
Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests
The federal government considers many factors when spending money to prevent structure fires.
The Lancet: Brexit will cause significant harm to the NHS, but No-Deal Brexit presents by far the worst option
All forms of Brexit will negatively impact the UK National Health Service (NHS), but the prospect of a No-Deal Brexit presents by far the worst scenario, with negative effects on the health care workforce, NHS financing, availability of medicines and vaccines, sharing of information and medical research, according to a new Health Policy review published in The Lancet.
Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain
When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm.
Bacteria walk (a bit) like we do
EPFL biophysicists have been able to directly study the way bacteria move on surfaces, revealing a molecular machinery reminiscent of motor reflexes.
New periodic table of droplets could help solve crimes
A team led by Paul Steen, professor of engineering at Cornell University, has created a periodic table of droplet motions, inspired in part by parallels between the symmetries of atomic orbitals, which determine elements' positions on the classic periodic table, and the energies that determine droplet shapes.
New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse
New University of Sydney research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse.
New protein 'switch' could be key to controlling blood-poisoning and preventing death
Scientists at the University of British Columbia have discovered a new protein 'switch' that could stop the progression of blood-poisoning, or sepsis, and increase the chances of surviving the life-threatening disease.
Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe
There has been a growing debate over whether uncomplicated appendicitis should be treated with antibiotics rather than surgery.
Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending, new study shows
We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a 'well-rounded ending' -- or one marked by a sense of closure--finds a team of psychology researchers.
Faster method to read quantum memory
Scientists at Aalto University and VTT have developed a faster way to read information out of qubits, the basic building blocks of a quantum computer.
Penn team eradicates Hepatitis C in patients after heart transplants from infected donors
Nine patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving heart transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Transplantation.
Live long and prosper: Mongooses enjoy lifelong benefits of 'silver spoon effect'
The benefits of the 'silver spoon effect' in mongoose pups extend across their lifetime, a new study has shown.
Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia
A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St.
Researchers invent a needle that knows where to go
In preclinical testing, resistance-sensing injector allows researchers to more safely and effectively deliver drugs to the body
A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery predicts outcomes in melanoma patients
A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery for melanoma can put patients in remission.
Cool adaptations to the cold
Icefish live in an environment that should be deadly for them.
New parents face 6 years of disrupted sleep
The birth of a child has drastic short-term effects on new mothers' sleep, particularly during the first three months after birth.
India's integrated child development program increases educational attainment
In a new study funded by Grand Challenges Canada through the Saving Brains project, researchers at CDDEP and the University of Pennsylvania evaluated the long-term impact of ICDS on schooling attainment of adolescents and adults in India.
Memories of movement are replayed randomly during sleep
After a rat has repeatedly moved from one spot to another, the same neurons that fired while the rat moved 'replay' this firing while the rat is asleep.

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