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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 04, 2019


India's stubble burning air pollution causes USD 30 billion economic losses, health risks
India's air pollution made headlines around the globe last year.
Steroid use during cardiac bypass surgery did not reduce risk of severe kidney injury
Using steroids during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery did not reduce the risk of acute kidney injury in people at increased risk of death, according to a study conducted in 18 countries published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
How do we follow the rhythm of language? The answer depends on our brain's path
How is our speech shaped by what we hear? The answer varies, depending on the make-up of our brain's pathways, a team of neuroscientists has found.
Smokers often misunderstand health risks of smokeless tobacco product, Rutgers study finds
American smokers mistakenly think that using snus, a type of moist snuff smokeless tobacco product, is as dangerous as smoking tobacco, according to a Rutgers study.
Researchers find potential new source of rare earth elements
Researchers have found a possible new source of rare earth elements - phosphate rock waste - and an environmentally friendly way to get them out, according to a study published in The Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics.
How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly
Researchers have determined how a type of bacteria commonly found in the mouth accelerates the growth of colon cancer.
Boyce Thompson Institute researchers uncover new structures at plant-fungal interface
For millions of years, plants and fungi have exchanged crucial nutrients such as phosphate and fatty acids, but the mechanism by which this exchange happens has been poorly understood.
Using sleep disorder to predict Parkinson's disease
A large multi-center study of more than 1,200 patients provides important predictors of Parkinson's disease progression, which will allow better candidate selection for clinical trials and more effective therapy development.
Optical clocks started the calibration of the international atomic time
Optical clocks of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and LNE-SYRTE (Systemes de Reference Temps-Espace, Observatoire de Paris, Universite PSL, CNRS, Sorbonne Universite, France) evaluated the latest 'one second' tick of the International Atomic Time (TAI) and provided these data to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures to be referred for adjusting the tick rate of TAI.
The first look at how hacked self-driving cars would affect New York City traffic
Researchers have analyzed the real-time effect of a large-scale hack on automobiles in a major urban environment.
Caregivers in Canada need more support
It's time to strengthen support for the 28 percent of people who provide care for an aging family member, friend or neighbor in Canada, argues an editorial in CMAJ.
Turning algae into fuel
A team of University of Utah chemical engineers have developed a new kind of jet mixer for creating biomass from algae that extracts the lipids from the watery plants with much less energy than the older extraction method.
NextCure and Yale publish Nature Medicine paper detailing novel immunomedicine target Siglec-15
Yale University's Office of Corporate Research (OCR) and NextCure, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering and developing next-generation immunomedicines for cancer and other immune-related diseases, today announced the publication of a research paper describing Siglec-15 (S15) as a new target for immunotherapy.
Small 'microdoses' of psychedelic drugs could treat depression and anxiety
Lava lamps, tambourines and, of course, psychedelic drugs were hallmarks of the 1960s.
Breast cancer cells rely on pyruvate to expand in new tissues
Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body.
Asteroids are stronger, harder to destroy than previously thought
A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up.
New scientific statement on blood pressure measurement in people
Oscillometric devices, which use an electronic pressure sensor within the blood pressure cuff, can reduce human error and the risk to the environment from older devices which use mercury.
Better to include your better half in social posts, study finds
New research from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Kansas found that sharing information online can do more harm to romantic relationships than good.
How new species arise in the sea
How can a species split into several new species if they still live close to each other and are able to interbreed?
Reevaluating pneumococcal vaccine guidance: An analysis
If mitigating racial disparities in those who contract pneumococcal diseases, such as meningitis and pneumonia, is a top public health priority, then recommending that all adults get a pneumococcal vaccine at age 50 would likely be effective guidance.
Researchers discover sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides
Repurposing a strain of beneficial bacteria could offer a safe, sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides, according to research from Cardiff University.
Genomic testing of a single patient reveals a gene commonly mutated in pediatric melanoma
Comprehensive clinical genomic testing of an adolescent patient, including whole genome sequencing, helped researchers identify mutations in a single gene that drive the most common childhood melanoma.
Global maps enabling targeted interventions to reduce burden of mosquito-borne disease
The global population at risk from mosquito-borne diseases -- including yellow fever, Zika and dengue - is expanding with changes in the distribution of two key mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.
Scientists expose hidden risks of diarrhoeal disease
New research identifies a rapidly evolving new subspecies of the cryptosporidium parasite -- a leading cause of diarrhoeal disease in children worldwide.
Researchers discover new portal of entry for influenza viruses
Influenza viruses from bats use an entirely different portal to enter the cell than all previously known types of influenza / human cells also infectable in the lab / publication in Nature.
Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Exercise has potential to improve non-motor as well as motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including cognitive function, report investigators in a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.
A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases
A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del Río, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER-- ISCIII) and Fundación Jiménez Díaz has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum.
A small plesiosaur lived in Spain 125 million years ago
Plesiosaurs, erroneously viewed as dinosaurs, inhabited all the seas between 200 million and 65 million years ago.
Chandelier neuron requires 'Velcro-like' molecule to form connections
Researchers have identified the protein L1CAM as an essential ingredient for forming unique connections between chandelier cells and the many neighboring partner cells they regulate.
Patients who stay in hospital less than 3 days after TAVR fare better
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients who are required to stay in the hospital more than three days after the procedure are at a significantly greater risk of heart attack, stroke or death after one year, compared to patients discharged in less than 72 hours, according to a study published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
Do all networks obey the scale-free law? Maybe not
A new study debunks a popular, two-decade-old theory about the shape of networks.
The speedy secrets of mako sharks -- 'cheetahs of the ocean'
To investigate how shortfin mako sharks achieve their impressive speeds, researchers tested real sharkskin samples, using digital particle image velocimetry.
'A gift from the city to itself'
Coastal cities are among the fastest growing population centres on the planet and half of the global population now lives within 100km of the coast.
Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast.
Brain's ability to synchronize voice sounds could be related to language learning
Researchers from Barcelona and New York, studied the synchronization of speech motor rhythms.
A new machine learning model can classify lung cancer slides at the pathologist level
Dartmouth researchers have developed a deep neural network to classify lung cancer subtypes on histopathology slides and found that it performed on par with three practicing pathologists.
Bundle payment model analysis of emerging breast cancer screening
Bundled payments have been touted as mechanisms to optimize quality and costs.
Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation
The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population.
A long view of California's climate
Deadly severe wildfires in California have scientists scrutinizing the underlying factors that could influence future extreme events.
Assembly in the air: Using sound to defy gravity
Scientists at the University of Bath have levitated particles using sound in an experiment which could have applications in so-called 'soft robotics.'
Chirality yields colossal photocurrent
Typically, light is converted to electricity by chemically altering a semiconductor to have a built-in electric field.
Putting the break on our immune system's response
Researchers have discovered how a tiny molecule known as miR-132 acts as a 'handbrake' on our immune system -- helping us fight infection.
Superconductivity is heating up
Theory suggests that metallic hydrogen should be a superconductor at room temperature; however, this material has yet to be produced in the lab.
Neurodegenerative diseases identified using artificial intelligence
Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence platform to detect a range of neurodegenerative disease in human brain tissue samples, including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
Researchers use machine learning to more quickly analyze key capacitor materials
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology are using machine learning to ultimately find ways to build more capable capacitors.
Promising new pancreatic cancer treatment moves forward
A study published today in the journal Nature Medicine led by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) describes a new therapeutic approach with potential for patients with pancreatic cancer.
Magnonic devices can replace electronics without much noise
Electronic devices are getting smaller and will soon hit the limits of performance based on electrical currents.
Biodiversity crisis: Technological advances in agriculture are not a sufficient response
Rapid population and economic growth are destroying biodiversity. This was reported by researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
Step right up for bigger 2D sheets
Small steps make a big difference in the growth of 2D crystals.
UCF research laying groundwork for off-world colonies
Before civilization can move off world it must make sure its structures work on the extraterrestrial foundations upon which they will be built.
New study calls for supervision orders to have 'more teeth'
This study, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, is the first national study of all children placed on supervision orders between 2010/11 and 2016/17 -- a total of 19,296 children.
Ultracold atoms could provide 2D window to exotic 1D physics
Rice physicists propose new vantage point to observe quantum fractionalization.
Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins
In a new study, Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State University explore a surprising property of proteins -- one that has only recently come to light.
Swimming microbes steer themselves into mathematical order
Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually the swarm will go with its own flow.
New study highlights the influence social media has on children's food intake
New University of Liverpool research, published in Pediatrics, highlights the negative influence that social media has on children's food intake.
Wildfire risk in California no longer coupled to winter precipitation
Wet winters no longer predict possible relief from severe wildfires for California.
Renal reabsorption in living devices
To enable the study of renal reabsorption outside the human body, a team at the Wyss Institute created a 3D vascularized proximal tubule and used it to measure the transport of glucose from the proximal tubule to the blood vessels, along with the effects of hyperglycemia, a condition associated with diabetes in patients.
How to catch a magnetic monopole in the act
A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a nanoscale 'playground' on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called 'monopoles.' The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data.
Should patients be considered consumers?
No, and doing so can undermine efforts to promote patient-centered health care, write three Hastings Center scholars in the March issue of Health Affairs.
Applying a network perspective to human physiology
Medical practitioners commonly treat organs in isolation, but Boston University physicist Plamen Ivanov wants to usher in a new paradigm.
Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments
Researchers find a Florida-specific strain of red-tide causing algae thrives in both high and low CO2 concentrations.
Diabetes impairs multipotent stromal cell antibacterial activity
A new study reveals that the multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) of persons with diabetes have diminished capacity to fight off bacterial infection, providing new understanding into the basis of diabetes-associated immune dysfunction.
Plasma protein may hold promise for wound scaffolds
Researchers in Germany have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds.
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Ancient mammal remains digested by crocodiles reveal new species
Fossilized bones that appear to have been digested by crocodiles in the Cayman Islands have revealed three new species and subspecies of mammal that roamed the island more than 300 years ago.
Physicists solve 35-year-old mystery about quarks
Physicists from Tel Aviv University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility now know why quarks, the building blocks of the universe, move more slowly inside atomic nuclei, solving a 35-year-old-mystery.
Genetic factors influence human brain expansion
An analysis published in JNeurosci of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals genetically-mediated associations between the size of evolutionarily novel brain regions and intelligence test scores.
Scientists develop printable water sensor
A new, versatile plastic-composite sensor can detect tiny amounts of water.
Potential treatment strategy uncovered for pancreatic cancer
Published in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other collaborating institutions report promising results from early laboratory studies of a treatment strategy that forces pancreatic cancer to rely on a type of energy production called autophagy, also known as 'self-eating,' in which cells recycle their own parts for energy.
Psychedelic microdosing in rats shows beneficial effects
Microdosing -- taking tiny amounts of psychedelic drugs to boost mood and mental acuity -- is based on anecdotal reports of its benefits.
Sensory stimuli improves brain damage in mouse models of preterm birth
A research conducted by the INc-UAB shows that the same perinatal brain injury caused by hypoxia and ischemia have differentiated effects on each gender, but can be improved through tactile and proprioceptive stimuli.
A new approach to an old question: How do we actually cooperate?
Princeton researchers are exploring how cooperation arises in human societies, where people tend to cluster into various group types -- political, religious, familial, professional, etc.
Long-lived parents produce better quality offspring
New research shows that long-lived parents produce better quality offspring.
Chemists 'print' sensors for nano-objects
Young scientists from ITMO University proposed a new type of optical nano-sensors.
New quantum sensor could improve cancer treatment
A new quantum sensor developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing has proven it can outperform existing technologies and promises significant advancements in long-range 3D imaging and monitoring the success of cancer treatments.
Luminescent bacteria in squid light organ drive systemic changes in host
A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, revealed that luminescent bacteria, which live harmoniously inside the Hawaiian bobtail squid's light organ, change the gene expression in other organs of their squid host.
A faster, more accurate way to monitor drought
A new drought monitoring method developed at Duke University allows scientists to identify the onset of drought sooner, meaning conservation or remediation measures could be put into place sooner.
Poll shows many older adults, especially those with health issues, feel isolated
One in four older adults say they feel isolated from other people at least some of the time, and one in three say they lack regular companionship, according to a new national poll.
Kidney disease killer vulnerable to targeted nano therapy
By loading a chelation drug into a nano-sized homing device, researchers at Clemson University have reversed in an animal model the deadliest effects of chronic kidney disease, which kills more people in the United States each year than breast or prostate cancer.
Exposure to trauma impacts ability to squash bad memories
People exposed to trauma are less able to suppress unwanted emotional memories due to neural and behavioral disruptions in their brain that may contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material's ability to store energy
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes.
Texas Biomed scientists developing new vaccine strategy for tuberculosis
- For years, scientists have been trying to come up with a better way to protect people against tuberculosis, the disease caused by infection with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria.
Gut immune cells play by their own rules
Only a few vaccines -- for example, against polio and rotavirus -- can be given orally.
Experts tackle major cardiovascular issues in treating patients with HIV
Now that patients are able to live longer and remain free of developing AIDS, they have begun to encounter new risks from age-related disorders common in the general population, including cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them
IBS scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors.
Discovery of the genetic 'conductor' of brain stem cells
Our brain comprises 85 billion nerve cells and just as many so-called glial cells.
Novel treatments offer new hope for patients with autoimmune disease
Researchers at University of Utah Health have developed a new approach that targets the misfunctioning immune cells while leaving normal immune cells in place.
The random anti-laser
Scientists at TU Wien have found a way to build the 'opposite' of a laser -- a device that absorbs a specific light wave perfectly.
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery.
Dental fillings could last twice as long
A compound used to make car bumpers strong and protect wood decks could prevent return visits to the dentist's office.
New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing
Researchers have created a new device that allows them to probe the interference of quasiparticles, potentially paving the way for the development of topological qubits.
Promising strategy to fight the most deadly brain tumor in children
A study published in Nature Communications found that an inhibitor of an enzyme called ACVR1 slows tumor growth and increases survival in an animal model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) -- the most deadly brain tumor in children.
Young people at risk of addiction have differences in key brain region
Young adults at risk of developing problems with addiction show key differences in an important region of the brain, according to an international team led by researchers at the University of Cambridge.
Study: More than one-third of patients risk major bleeding by doubling up on blood thinners
A new study finds patients were taking too many antithrombotics for no reason, leading to a significant increase in bleeding events.
HPTN 071 demonstrates community-wide HIV prevention strategy can reduce new infections
Findings from HPTN 071 (PopART) show delivery of an HIV prevention strategy that includes offering in-home HIV testing to everyone, with immediate referral to HIV care, and treatment for people living with HIV based on prevailing in-country guidelines, can substantially reduce new HIV infections.
Are mosaic embryos the 'dark horse' of IVF?
New research conducted by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at OHSU is the first to confirm in a nonhuman primate model, that mosaic embryos can adapt to their abnormalities and persist in development, resulting in positive IVF outcomes.
Human 'footprint' on Antarctica measured for first time
The full extent of the human 'footprint' on Antarctica has been revealed for the first time by new IMAS-led research which used satellite images to measure stations, huts, runways, waste sites and tourist camps at 158 locations.
Chemical pollutants in the home degrade fertility in both men and dogs, study finds
New research by scientists at the University of Nottingham suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs.
Researchers systematically track protein interactions in defense against viruses
The body's defense strategies against viral infections are as diverse as the attacks themselves.
Trade war results in substantial losses for US and other countries
Because of import tariffs through November 2018, US importers and consumers experienced $12.3 billion in added tax costs and $6.9 billion from reduced imports that otherwise would have been purchased at a lower price without the tariffs.
Well-being and the rise of psychotherapy in Uganda
Perspectives on happiness and mental health differ across the world.
New shapes of laser beam 'sneak' through opaque media
Researchers have found a way to pre-treat a laser beam so that it enters opaque surfaces without dispersing -- like a headlight that's able to cut through heavy fog at full strength.
Scientists track deep history of planets' motions, and effects on Earth's climate
Using cores of rock, scientists have mapped out the tracks of several planets that influence the orbit, and thus the climate, of Earth, in a period 200 million years ago.
New key players in the methane cycle
Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy.
Study: Landlord disclosure of bedbugs cuts infestations, creates long-term savings
Policies requiring landlords to disclose bedbug infestations are an effective way to reduce the prevalence of infestations, according to a just-published study.
Pancreatic cancer collective comments on promising new pancreatic cancer
Lustgarten Foundation and SU2C offer comments on research describing a new combination drug therapy demonstrating promise for patients with pancreatic cancer.
Radiation after surgery triples survival for a type of pediatric brain tumor
Radiation immediately following surgery in children with ependymoma, the third most common pediatric brain tumor, can nearly triple survival.
Want to save the planet? Stop trying to be its friend
Research published in Frontiers in Psychology reveals how advertisers, politicians and economic systems play on the psychology of 'climate compensation' -- and encourages a more rational approach to environmental responsibility.
Researchers find window of opportunity for treatment of early cystic fibrosis lung infections
New research from DTU Biosustain and Rigshospitalet suggests that disease-causing microbes in young cystic fibrosis (CF) patients change rapidly within two to three years after first infection.
Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute
Researchers at the University of Bristol, Eindhoven University of Technology and Microsoft Research have successfully assembled communities of artificial cells that can chemically communicate and perform molecular computations using entrapped DNA logic gates.
Sacrificing the climate for reelections
In business as well as international politics, the best and ideal agreement is one that is credible and expected to be complied with.
World-first program uncovers errors in biomedical research results
Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research.
In search of new 'sugar cleavers'
Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world.
Genomics could better match treatments to pancreatic cancer patients
Pancreatic cancer is a grim diagnosis, but this new study, the largest of its kind, identifies genomic markers that could increase survival by better matching chemotherapy drugs to patients.
Radiography of marine litter in Spanish waters
Marine litter is a growing problem in the Mediterranean Sea, but few studies have focused on its composition, spatial distribution and temporal evolution.
Forecasting mosquitoes' global spread
New prediction models factoring in climate, urbanization and human travel and migration offer insight into the recent spread of two key disease-spreading mosquitoes -- Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.
Due to humans, extinction risk for 1,700 animal species to increase by 2070
As humans continue to expand our use of land across the planet, we leave other species little ground to stand on.
The political power of 'the': A linguistic analysis
A new study of the English definite article 'the' demonstrates that even seemingly drab function words can send powerful social and political signals.
Scientists provide first evidence of diphtheria-like infectious agent in hedgehogs
As cultural successors, hedgehogs reside in close proximity to humans.
How bacteria can help prevent coal ash spills
Researchers have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce 'biocement' in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface waters.
Seven moral rules found all around the world
What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world?
How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'
Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is known only from its gigantic bladelike teeth.
Nearly half of Americans have had a family member jailed, imprisoned
A groundbreaking Cornell-led study included for the first time data for both prison and jail time to illuminate the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the US, nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a brother or sister, parent, spouse or child spend time in jail or prison -- a far higher figure than previously estimated.
How celastrol sensitizes brains to leptin, curbing hunger and obesity
Celastrol's potent anti-obesity effects were widely reported in 2015. Derived from the roots of the thunder god vine, the drug curbed food intake in obese mice by nearly 80 percent, producing up to a 45 percent weight loss.
First genetic clue for elusive pediatric liver disease
A nationwide consortium of researchers has identified the first genetic defect linked to biliary atresia, a mysterious liver disease that is the leading cause for liver transplantation in children.
Let the sperm races begin
For best chances of in vitro fertilization success, the most motile sperm are chosen from semen.
A quick path to antimalarial resistance
Resistance to antimalarial drugs is thought to result mainly from changes in the parasite's genome.
Researchers uncover new facets of HIV's 'arms race' with human defense system
A new study reveals details about the evolutionary contest between HIV and the human immune system that could one day improve treatment.
Imaging technique lets ordinary cameras capture high-speed images of crack formation
Because cracks propagate quickly, studying the fracturing process currently requires expensive high-speed cameras.
Researchers develop mini kidneys from urine cells
Scientists from Utrecht University, University Medical Center Utrecht and Hubrecht Institute have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells.
Pumping iron could save your life
Researchers from Osaka University have found that sarcopenia, a condition characterized by decreased skeletal muscle mass, is strongly associated with poor treatment outcomes in lung cancer patients in response to programed death-1 (PD-1)-inhibitor therapy.
Scientists use machine learning to identify high-performing solar materials
Thanks to a study that combines the power of supercomputing with data science and experimental methods, researchers at the U.S.
The case of the over-tilting exoplanets
For almost a decade, astronomers have tried to explain why so many pairs of planets outside our solar system have an odd configuration -- their orbits seem to have been pushed apart by a powerful unknown mechanism.
When it comes to hearing words, it's a division of labor between our brain's two hemispheres
Scientists have uncovered a new 'division of labor' between our brain's two hemispheres in how we comprehend the words and other sounds we hear -- a finding that offers new insights into the processing of speech and points to ways to address auditory disorders.
Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night
UChicago scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny 'ice quakes' that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night.
The force is with us, always? Tuning quantum vacuum forces from attractive to repulsive
Scientists can put two uncharged metal plates close together in a vacuum, and 'voila!' ---they will attract each other.
Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations
In the cells of every living organism -- humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria -- proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis.
Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant
The research found that despite the low density of the desert yellowhead -- there are fewer than 15,000 individual plants scattered across just 55 acres -- these populations survive partly because of a principle called negative density dependence.
'Broken heart' syndrome may originate in the brain
Scientists have shown for the first time that the brain is involved in the development of a heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS).
Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the pavement
A new NC State University study of urban tree life in the Southeast shows pavement and concrete may have a bigger effect than longitudinal warming.
TIGER mouse debuts as model for neurological ailments
The study from Clemson University's College of Science uses a glowing mouse to track tiny message-carriers in the brain that could prove useful in diagnosing and treating injuries, infections or diseases.
SDSU study looks to limit secondhand smoke in homes with children
SDSU researchers found at least some smokers with kids will modify their behavior with an electronic push.
Source of citrus' sour taste is identified
A team of researchers, including two from the University of California, Riverside, has identified the genes responsible for the hallmark sour taste of many citrus fruits.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...