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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 06, 2019


Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals.
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions.
Potential new therapy for Crohn's, colitis identified
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a compound that may treat inflammatory bowel disease without directly targeting inflammation.
Breast milk as drug-delivery device
Treating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Bedtime protein for bigger gains? Here's the scoop
According to a review published in Frontiers in Nutrition, overnight sleep provides a unique nutritional window for boosting the muscle response to resistance training -- without increasing body fat.
MBL scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene 'partners' in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage.
Study reveals disparities in osteoporosis treatment by sex and race/ethnicity
New research indicates that elderly men are significantly undertreated for osteoporosis compared with elderly women, and blacks have the lowest treatment rates among racial/ethnic groups.
Statins linked to higher diabetes risk
Individuals who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at higher risk for developing high blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, and eventually type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
Timing of Medicare loss may affect long-term success of kidney transplantation
Kidney transplant recipients under 65 years of age qualify for Medicare coverage following transplantation, but coverage ends after three years.
Vast record of past climate fluctuations now available thanks to laser imaging of shells
An international team has developed newly refined techniques for obtaining past climate data from mollusc shells.
Does cognitive function affect oral health during aging?
In a Community Dentistry & Oral Epidemiology study, poor cognitive function in older adults was associated with poorer oral health and higher risk of tooth loss in later life.
New findings may help guide treatment of patients with asthma
Asthma patients often undergo tests involving inhaled methacholine, a drug that can cause narrowing of the airways, similar to what occurs in asthma.
Surprise billing debate continues to transfix state and federal policy makers
This briefing paper seeks to bring needed clarity to the feverish, ongoing surprise billing debate underway on the state and federal level.
Ecological vineyards help protecting bird population in the environment
Ecological farmlands help protecting bird populations and reducing the effects of global change on the environment.
How viruses outsmart their host cells
Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses?
CT scans offer clues to preventing heart problems after cancer treatment
An imaging procedure commonly performed before starting cancer treatment can provide valuable clues about a patient's risk for heart problems in the months and years after treatment.
Remote blood pressure monitoring via smartphone app shows promise
People with both diabetes and uncontrolled high blood pressure who used a smartphone app to monitor their blood pressure remotely, get tips on healthful living and connect with a health coach saw significant declines in their blood pressure within six weeks, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Sensory tests suggest 'liking' wines made with native grapes a learned response
Consumer preference or aversion to wines made from native grapes -- such as Concord, Niagara and Catawba, which are grown in North America -- may depend on early exposure to the fruits' sweet, ultra ''grapey'' taste and aroma, according to researchers who conducted sensory tests with wine drinkers in Pennsylvania and California.
Over half of ED visits for nonmedical prescription drug use are patients under 35
Using nationally representative public health surveillance data to characterize US ED visits for harm caused by nonmedical prescription drug use, investigators at CDC and FDA report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that over half these visits are by young adults under 35, and over 40 percent of patients arrive unconscious or after cardiorespiratory failure.
High-intensity interval training helps trim belly fat in cardiac rehab
A popular exercise routine that alternates intense bursts of activity with short recovery periods to rapidly enhance exercise performance is now finding its way into programs to strengthen the heart after a heart attack.
Good news! Europe's electric grid will still work even as the world crumbles
Temperatures may climb and seas may rise, but the lights (and, undoubtedly, the air conditioning) will still be on in nations with high capacities for wind and solar energy.
Study examines which schoolchildren are most likely to skip breakfast
Skipping breakfast was common in an observational study of schoolchildren in Greece, and children who skipped breakfast tended to have an unhealthy lifestyle profile.
Breast cancer patients weigh in on addressing financial burdens
A qualitative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health yielded nine patient-driven recommendations across circumstances that include changes to insurance, supportive services and financial assistance to reduce long-term, breast cancer-related economic burden.
Getting more mileage from microsatellites
Researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, are using a next-generation sequencing genotyping approach to find insight into the evolutionary history of the carob tree -- an economically important species with a long history in the Mediterranean.
Graphene quantum dots for single electron transistors
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics, Manchester University, the Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have developed a novel technology, which combines the fabrication procedures of planar and vertical heterostructures in order to assemble graphene-based single-electron transistors of excellent quality.
Researchers outline goals for collecting and studying samples from Mars
A new paper published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science describes the results of a major collaboration among 71 scientists from throughout the international science community to define specific scientific objectives for a Mars Sample Return campaign, to describe the critical measurements that would need to be done on returned samples to address the objectives, and to identify the kinds of samples that would be most likely to carry the key information.
Tuberculosis diagnosis in people with HIV increases risk of death within 10 years
Among people with HIV in Latin America, those diagnosed with tuberculosis at an initial clinic visit were about twice as likely to die within 10 years as people not initially diagnosed with TB, according to new findings.
Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head
New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities.
Strategies developed to include more racial and ethnic minorities in clinical trials
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center was part of a study involving eight cancer centers that was published on March 4 in the American Society of Clinical Oncology's Journal of Oncology Practice.
Houston, we're here to help the farmers
The International Space Station's ECOSTRESS gathers plant data.
Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma
Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed.
Ultrasound for thrombosis prevention
Researchers established real-time ultrasonic monitoring of the blood's aggregate state using the in vitro blood flow model.
Cancer death rate higher for patients with mental health history
Cancer patients who have been hospitalised for mental health problems prior to their cancer diagnosis were 73 percent more likely to die from their cancer compared to those who had never had psychiatric help, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer.
A 'Post-Antibiotic World?'
The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA.
Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou
Researchers used motion-triggered cameras to capture photographs of wolves, caribou, and other wildlife species in the Canadian Oil Sands to study the habitat use patterns of these animals and test management strategies aimed at reducing the impacts of the linear developments on caribou.
States with permissive gun laws have higher mass shooting rates
States with more permissive gun laws and greater gun ownership have higher rates of mass shootings, and a growing divide is emerging between states with restrictive versus permissive gun laws.
Resistance training may help prevent type 2 diabetes
A new study published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews points to the benefits of exercise, especially resistance training (RT), for preventing type 2 diabetes.
Menopause symptoms nearly double the risk of chronic pain
In addition to the other health conditions affected by estrogen, it has also been shown to affect pain sensitivity.
Diabetes' sworn enemy could ultimately be a valuable ally
Montreal research team unravels an adaptive mechanism involved in controlling insulin action, showing that glucagon plays a crucial part in it and can thus be a protective asset.
Women of childbearing age have staggeringly low rates of lipid screening
Eight out of 10 women of childbearing age have never had their cholesterol levels checked, despite clear guidelines to get a first lipid blood test early in adulthood, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
People track when talkers say 'uh' to predict what comes next
Speakers tend to say 'uh' before uncommon words ('uh... automobile') rather than common words ('car').
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening
Tropical Cyclone Haleh continued to move in a southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead.
Anti-inflammatory drug is the key to boosting cardiac reprogramming
University of Tsukuba researchers and colleagues developed a high-throughput screening system to identify the NSAID diclofenac as a factor responsible for enhancing cardiac reprogramming in postnatal and adult fibroblasts.
1 + 1 does not equal 2 for graphene-like 2D materials
Physicists from the University of Sheffield have discovered that when two atomically thin graphene-like materials are placed on top of each other their properties change, and a material with novel hybrid properties emerges, paving the way for design of new materials and nano-devices.
Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out
Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike.
Want a healthy heart? Turn off the TV and eat a good breakfast
The small lifestyle choices we make each day add up when it comes to heart health.
SLU study: Mediterranean diet boosts endurance exercise within days
Researchers at Saint Louis University have found that eating a Mediterranean diet can improve athletes' endurance exercise performance after just four days.
ECG rhythm and airway management make all the difference during a heart attack
Japan-based research examined a large-scale national registry of cardiac arrest cases to measure the effects of advanced airway management (AAM) on one-month outcomes after patients survived.
Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese
New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases.
More than just memories: a new role for the hippocampus during learning
Without an intact hippocampus, forming new memories is impossible. Researchers from Arizona State University and Stanford University found an equally important role for the hippocampus: feeding information to brain areas responsible for learning.
Deep learning merges advantages of holography and bright-field microscopy for 3D imaging
Researchers at UCLA have developed an artificial neural network-based 3D imaging method, termed Bright-field Holography, which combines the image contrast advantage of bright-field microscopy and the snapshot volumetric imaging capability of holography.
Improving molecular imaging using a deep learning approach
Generating comprehensive molecular images of organs and tumors in living organisms can be performed at ultra-fast speed using a new deep learning approach to image reconstruction developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Light from an exotic crystal semiconductor could lead to better solar cells
Scientists have found a new way to control light emitted by exotic crystal semiconductors, which could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Today.
Eating healthy on a limited budget is possible
A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that with menu planning and access to stores selling items in bulk, the average daily cost for serving healthy meals to a family of four was $25 in 2010 dollars.
The Lancet Global Health: Restrictive migration policies contribute to poor migrant health in high-income countries
Restrictive entry and integration policies are having an adverse effect on the health of migrants in high-income countries, according to the most comprehensive assessment of the impact of general migration policies on migrant health, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
Two-thirds of pregnant women under 25 in London have a mental health problem
New research suggests two-thirds (67 percent) of pregnant women in London aged between 16 and 24 years have mental health problems including depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder, according to new research funded by the National Institute for Health Research.
AI study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes
In combination with conventional statistical methods, artificial intelligence (AI) has now been used in a study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes.
Rain is important for how carbon dioxide affects grasslands
Vegetation biomass on grasslands increases in response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, but less than expected.
Fake warnings on e-cigarette ads distract kids from truth
When adolescent boys viewed fake-warning ads with messages such as ''IMPORTANT: Contains flavor,'' those marketing messages stuck with them, according to the new study, which appears in the journal Tobacco Control and was led by Brittney Keller-Hamilton of The Ohio State University.
App uses smartphone camera, flashlight to detect diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is among the strongest risk factors for heart disease, yet up to 1 in 3 people living with diabetes don't know they have it and go untreated.
The evolution of grain yield
A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops.
Do weight-loss surgery outcomes differ between black and white patients?
Researchers examined the association of race on outcomes of weight-loss surgery for black and white patients in Michigan by analyzing data from a statewide clinical registry.
States with strict gun laws see more homicides when they border states with lax ones
Gun-related homicide rates in states with strict gun laws increase when neighboring states have less restrictive laws as a result of gun trafficking across state lines, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine.
As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage
Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new Nature study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils.
Scientists find method to boost CRISPR efficiency
Scientists have developed a method to boost the efficiency of CRISPR gene editing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to a study that could have implications for optimizing gene therapies for other diseases.
Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard
A study led by the University of California, Davis, is one of the first to address the potential for sugar water from hummingbird feeders to act as a vector for avian -- or even zoonotic -- pathogens.
Heart-healthy diets in early adulthood linked to better brain function in middle age
Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, moderate in nuts, fish and alcohol and low in meat and full-fat dairy is associated with better cognitive performance in middle age, according to a study published in the March 6, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees
Periodical dust loads on foods places dietary-physiological stress on the digestive system in chimpanzees.
Scientists reveal Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent weak biases in ocean models
The Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent is not well simulated in many ocean models because of its complex dynamics.
Scientists tackle major challenges to sending astronauts to search for life on Mars
An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster's School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there?
New hepatitis C cases down by almost 70 percent in HIV-positive men in London
New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV-positive men in London have fallen by nearly 70 percent in recent years.
Molecular connection between nutrient availability and embryonic growth identified
Investigators of the CRG discover that AHCY, a nutrient metabolism sensor protein, is a direct activator of the genes involved in the proliferation of embryo stem cells.
Engineers develop inexpensive, smart stop sign to improve driver safety
According to the US Department of Transportation, more than half of all roadway fatalities occur on rural roads.
Better regulation of the immune system may minimize preeclampsia symptoms
Boosting the body's levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4)--an immune system protein that controls inflammation--may help manage the pregnancy complication preeclampsia, according to a new rodent study.
CAMH study reveals a new target for developing treatments for depression
A new CAMH study shows for the first time that people experiencing clinical depression have higher levels of a brain protein called MAO-B.
Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants
With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable -- but frustratingly untapped -- bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics.
Hurricane Maria had a significant impact on HIV care outcomes
Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico had a significant impact on HIV outcomes among people living with HIV and a history of substance use, particularly increased viral load and decreased CD4 counts.
Gut microbiota helps to maintain core body temperature under cold exposure
A research group led by Professor John R. Speakman from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has revealed the important role of gut microbiota in thermoregulation -- the way animals respond to cold exposure.
Blue-enriched white light to wake you up in the morning
Here is good news for those who have difficulty with morning alertness.
Cancer most frequently spreads to the liver; here's why
When cancer spreads to another organ, it most commonly moves to the liver, and now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they know why.
Ultra-low power chips help make small robots more capable
An ultra-low power hybrid chip inspired by the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences.
Preliminary estimation of undesired substances in diapers
The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES) has published a comprehensive report on hazardous substances in disposable panty diapers on January, 23, 2019 entitled ''Sécurité des couches pour bébé''.
New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss
A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to work published this week in The Cryosphere.
Simulated extravehicular activity science operations for Mars exploration
A new study describes the Science Operations component and new results from NASA's Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains (BASALT).
Social anxiety disorder may increase risk of alcoholism
New research published in Depression and Anxiety indicates that, unlike other anxiety disorders, social anxiety disorder may have a direct effect on alcoholism.
Opioid use associated with dramatic rise in dangerous heart infection
Hospital admissions for a dangerous heart infection related to intravenous drug use increased by 436 percent from 2012-2017 at a medical center in a region hit hard by the nation's opioid crisis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
New study finds pop lyrics contain just as many references to violence as hip-hop music
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that pop music lyrics contain the same amount of violent content as rap and hip-hop.
Study finds Ebola survivors in Liberia face ongoing health issues
Survivors of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Liberia had a higher prevalence of certain health issues -- including uveitis (eye redness and pain), abdominal, chest, neurologic, and musculoskeletal abnormalities upon physical exam -- when compared to a control group of household and community members without a history of EVD, according to findings from an ongoing study published in the NEJM.
Autism: Brain activity as a biomarker
Researchers from Jülich, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, and the UK have discovered specific activity patterns in the brains of people with autism.
Knee pain not linked with activity levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis
Knee pain was not associated with daily walking levels in an Arthritis Care & Research study of individuals with mild to moderate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.
Impact of urbanization on wild bees underestimated
Wild bees are indispensable pollinators, supporting both agricultural productivity and the diversity of flowering plants worldwide.
Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems
A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked.
Small molecule inhibitors show treatment potential for EBV-associated cancers
Wistar researchers have created a drug candidate for cancers associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis.
Improved regulation needed as pesticides found to affect genes in bees
Scientists are urging for improved regulation on pesticides after finding that they affect genes in bumblebees, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London in collaboration with Imperial College London.
Low-cost 'cancer probe' could spot deadly melanoma early
Work is being done at UBC on a tool to help in the early detection of melanoma: a simple, compact laser probe that can distinguish between harmless moles and cancerous ones -- in a matter of seconds.
Financial illiteracy and irrational thinking are causing a dangerous shortfall in retirement savings
Since individuals do not make rational decisions in complex matters such as retirement planning, the researchers suggest an alternative behavioral approach.
Improving solar cell efficiency with a bucket of water
Beth Parks has devised an astonishingly simple way to overcome a limitation of solar cells -- a bucket of water.
NFL players show heart abnormalities decades after retiring from football
While elite athletes are often at peak fitness, they are not immune to--and may even face a higher risk for--potentially detrimental heart conditions later in life.
Low-carb diet tied to common heart rhythm disorder
Low-carb diets are all the rage, but can cutting carbohydrates spell trouble for your heart?
Alzheimer's-like symptoms reversed in mice, USC researchers say
A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say
Transcription factor network gets to heart of wood formation
Research on high-level switches that control wood formation has applications in timber, paper and biofuels, as well as making forests healthier.
NYU Abu Dhabi study finds grasping motions lead by visuo-haptic signals are most effective
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have found that the availability of both visual and haptic information for a target object significantly improves reach-to-grasp actions, demonstrating that the nervous system utilizes both types of information to optimize movement execution.
Many patients with atopic dermatitis experience symptoms of anxiety and depression
A British Journal of Dermatology study has found substantially higher rates of anxiety and depression among US adults with atopic dermatitis, compared to those without.
Old drugs bring new hope to a cancer that lacks precision therapy
Two older drugs, designed for other purposes, produced promising results in the treatment of mice with triple negative breast cancer.
A groove is better with rhythm and harmony, new research shows
PhD candidate Tomas Mathews finds that the sensation that makes people want to move when they listen to music - the groove - is more enjoyable with moderate rhythm and harmony complexity.
Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air
Nearly 100 species of swift are completely adapted to life in the air.
Electrifying wound care: Better bandages to destroy bacteria
Bandages infused with electricity can help heal wounds faster than typical bandages or antibiotics -- but for years, researchers have not really understood why.
New insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet
A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilized palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought.
The science of knitting, unpicked
Knitting may be an ancient manufacturing method, but Elisabetta Matsumoto believes that understanding how different stitch types determine shape and mechanical strength will be invaluable for designing materials for future technologies, and a more detailed understanding of the knitting 'code' could benefit manufacturers around the world.
In fiction young people choose traditional love and gender stereotypes
Fictional television series can have an influence on the construction of young people's identities and values.
Key genetic component may be linked to more aggressive cases of inflammatory bowel disease
A comprehensive analysis involving 14 different groups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and 1,800 intestinal biopsies has pinpointed a key genetic component linked to more aggressive cases of the condition.
Binding with consequences
Researchers from Freiburg and Ulm discover mechanism through which bacteria attack white blood cells.
Bone fractures increasing as seniors walk dogs to stay active
Between 2004 and 2017, dog-walking-related fractures in people 65-or-older more than doubled.
Migrating snowline plays outsized role in setting pace of Greenland ice melt
Meltwater from Greenland's ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor -- the position of the snowline on the ice sheet -- plays a key role in setting the pace of melting.
Higher fitness level can determine longer lifespan after age 70
Researchers have uncovered one more reason to get off the couch and start exercising, especially if you're approaching your golden years.
Hypertension-related changes may occur earlier in young women with family history
New research suggests that young women with a family history of high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased baroreflex function, which may increase their risk for hypertension later in life.
Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes
Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage.
Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?
Information escapes from black holes via Hawking radiation, so it should be possible to capture it and use it to reconstruct what fell in: if given time longer than the age of the universe.
Ion experiment aces quantum scrambling test
Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute have implemented an experimental test for quantum scrambling, a chaotic shuffling of the information stored among a collection of quantum particles.
Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranes
Bacterial biofilms are typically the target of heavy-duty cleaning regimens, but these films aren't always bad news.
Mass. General-led study provides new insights into the role of aging in heart failure
A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that activity of an important signaling pathway increases with aging and with heart failure and that inhibiting that pathway can improve cardiac function in mouse models.
Elegant interplay of coloration strategies is discovered in squid's smart skin
In the blink of an eye, the squid's skin changes color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling, a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists.
Professor Mary Schooling analyzes the relationship between testosterone and serious heart conditions
To explore whether there is a strong association between testosterone and the development of heart disease, CUNY SPH Professor Mary Schooling led a study using a technique called Mendelian randomization to analyze genetic variants that predict testosterone levels and their associations with blood clots, heart failure and heart attack in almost 400,000 men and women from a large genetic study and the UK Biobank study.
Estimates of older patients with fractures associated with walking leashed dogs
Dog walking is often suggested as something older adults can do to improve their health.
Effects of spaceflight on heart cell formation from stem cells
Researchers used time-lapse imaging to show that mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown during spaceflight differentiated into cardiomyocytes significantly faster than similar cells grown at Earth's gravity.
UTSW researchers determine structures of elusive innate immunity protein
UT Southwestern researchers used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine the near-atomic structure of the smallest membrane protein solved to date.
How one small village in Germany reinvented itself to ensure its survival
How can communities living together in rural areas ensure that they continue to exist and thrive?
Evidence for human involvement in extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene
By re-dating giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentinian Pampas region using more advanced technology, scientists say they have provided evidence that humans hunted and butchered this animal near a swamp during the end of the Pleistocene.
Diagnostic uncertainty in children with fever impacts health service resources
The management of febrile illness (fever) in children has a substantial impact on National Health Services resources, predominantly due to diagnostic uncertainty resulting from a lack of accurate tests to distinguish between viral and bacterial illness, a new study reports.
Growing evidence: water as a potential treatment for inherited cause of kidney failure
People with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) could benefit from a moderate increase in water intake, according to new research.

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