Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 07, 2019


Child's elevated mental ill-health risk if mother treated for infection during pregnancy
Risks for autism and depression are higher if one's mother was in hospital with an infection during pregnancy.
Researchers look to nature to unearth the secrets of cyclic imine cleavage
University of Tsukuba researchers have shown that enzymes can degrade cyclic imines.
New photography approach gives traditional cameras ultra-high imaging speeds
Researchers have developed a new imaging method that can capture images at speeds of up to 1.5 million frames per second using standard imaging sensors typically limited to 100 frames per second.
Human activity quickly killing cultural diversity of the chimpanzee
The impact human activities have on the cultural behaviors and traditions of our closest relative, the chimpanzee, is drastic, reports a new study -- one based on an unprecedented data set of nearly 150 African chimpanzee communities.
Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening in NASA-NOAA satellite imagery  
Tropical Cyclone Haleh continues to weaken while being battered by outside winds.
When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum
A team of researchers led by DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines -- superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior that could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems -- and provide a platform for exotic new physics.
A television in the bedroom?
Spending too much time watching TV in their room can harm preschoolers' development, an Université de Montréal study finds.
Longitudinal studies provide an excellent research learning environment for trainees
Compared to experimental studies that require complex infrastructures such as laboratories or clinical trials at multiple centers, studies using a longitudinal cohort (an observational research method in which data is gathered for the same participants repeatedly over a period of time) could be a good alternative for investigators as they begin their early research careers.
ENDO 2019 news conferences to feature breakthroughs in diabetes, reproductive health, aging
Researchers will explore the link between unhealthy snack intake and screen time, long-term opioid use and its impact on men's testosterone levels, and other emerging science during news conferences at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting taking place March 23-26 in New Orleans, La.
New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists
A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment.
Green spaces can help you trust strangers
Simple, inexpensive urban design interventions can increase well-being and social connections among city residents, finds a new case study from the Urban Realities Lab at the University of Waterloo.
New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors
MIT researchers have developed a near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging system that could enable them to find tiny tumors, as small as a couple of hundred cells, deep within the body.
High-speed, 3D microscope captures stunning videos of fruit fly nerve cells in action
Columbia engineers and neuroscientists have joined forces to create 3D videos of individual nerve cells moving, stretching and switching on inside fruit fly larvae as they move.
Embryos' signals take multiple paths
Rice University bioscientists uncover details about how embryonic stem cells respond to the collection of signals that direct their differentiation into blood, bone and tissue.
Researchers discover a new mechanism used by bacteria to evade antibiotics
Antibiotics survival mechanism: UC San Diego researchers have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to defend themselves against antibiotics, a surprise finding that could lead to retooled drugs to treat infectious diseases.
How the global gag rule stifles free speech
A new journal article by researchers in the Global Health Justice and Governance program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health argues that the Expanded Global Gag Rule is having a chilling effect, dampening debate, advocacy, and collaboration around abortion and other sexual and reproductive rights.
Waterpipe and cigarette smoking linked to heart attacks at younger age in Saudi Arabians
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 7 March 2019: Waterpipe and cigarette smoking are associated with heart attacks at a younger age in Saudi Arabians, reports a study presented at the 30th Annual Conference of the Saudi Heart Association (SHA 30).
Study: Democracy fosters economic growth
A new study co-authored by an MIT economist shows that when it comes to growth, democracy significantly increases development.
In developing nations, national parks could save endangered species
A new study of animal populations inside and outside a protected area in Senegal, Niokolo-Koba National Park, shows that protecting such an area from human interaction and development preserves not only chimps but many other mammal species.
Moderate alcohol consumption linked with high blood pressure
A study of more than 17,000 US adults shows that moderate alcohol consumption -- seven to 13 drinks per week -- substantially raises one's risk of high blood pressure, or hypertension, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
What does the Milky Way weigh? Hubble and Gaia investigate
We can't put the whole Milky Way on a scale, but astronomers have been able to come up with one of the most accurate measurements yet of our galaxy's mass, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite.
BU researchers develop 'acoustic metamaterial' that cancels sound
Boston University researchers, Xin Zhang, a professor at the College of Engineering, and Ghaffarivardavagh, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, released a paper in Physical Review demonstrating it's possible to silence noise using an open, ringlike structure, created to mathematically perfect specifications, for cutting out sounds while maintaining airflow.
Purdue researchers develop innovative, more cost-effective method to make drugs
The Food and Drug Administration wants the pharmaceutical industry to get away from making drugs using the traditional batch method, saying the continuous process allows manufacturers to more easily scale operations to meet demand and should help reduce drug shortages.
Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections
In an innovation that may ultimately help to prevent deadly bloodstream infections, a team of biomedical engineers and infectious disease specialists at Brown University developed a coating to keep intravascular catheters from becoming a haven for harmful bacteria.
Unlocking the untapped potential of light in optical communications
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have fabricated a multiplexer/demultiplexer module based on a property of light that was not being exploited in communications systems: the optical vortex.
Hubble & Gaia accurately weigh the Milky Way
In a striking example of multi-mission astronomy, measurements from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the ESA Gaia mission have been combined to improve the estimate of the mass of our home galaxy the Milky Way: 1.5 trillion solar masses.
Researchers aiming to cure spina bifida get a step closer to their goal
Researchers on the path to finding a cure for spina bifida have identified specific elements in stem cell secretions as key to protecting neurons and ultimately reducing the lower-limb paralysis associated with the birth defect.
Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts
Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer.
Does awe lead to greater interest in science?
A new study finds that feeling awe leads to greater awareness of the things we don't know, which in turn makes us more likely to seek out a framework to fill those gaps.
Heart attacks increasingly common in young adults
Even though fewer heart attacks are occurring in the US -- in large part due to the use of medications like statins and a decline in smoking -- these events are steadily rising in very young adults.
Proof of pimple: Mouse model validates how 'good' and 'bad' bacteria affect acne
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine generated a new mouse model that mimics human acne for the first time, and used it to validate the concept of 'good' and 'bad' acne bacteria and introduce new possibilities for targeted treatments and vaccines.
Scientists find mystery killer whales off Cape Horn, Chile
In January 2019, an international team of scientists working off the tip of southern Chile got their first live look at what might be a new species of killer whale.
Using tiny organisms to unlock big environmental mysteries
Biological processes that influence climate and the environment, such as carbon fixation or nitrogen recycling are parts of these planet-wide processes are actually driven by the tangible actions of organisms at every scale of life, beginning at the smallest: the microorganisms living in the air, soil, and water.
Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees
Much of the variation in the behavior among wild chimpanzee groups may be akin to 'cultural' variation in humans.
Increasingly complex mini-brains
Scientists improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells.
Researchers find high blood pressure link
The age a woman begins menstruation is associated with having high blood pressure later in her life, according to a team of researchers at the University of Georgia.
Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design.
Study finds nonprofit partnerships can help solve bureaucratic tangles
Many nonprofit organizations steer clear of large, public-serving agencies due to concerns about becoming entangled in bureaucratic red tape.
Using laser 'tweezers,' scientists grab and study tiny protein droplets
Physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells.
Largest-ever study identifies gene regions associated with sleep duration
A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration.
Bullying bosses negatively impact employee performance and behavior
Employees bullied by their bosses are more likely to report unfairness and work stress, and consequently become less committed to their jobs or even retaliate, according to a Portland State University study.
Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird
A team led by a conservation biologist from the University of Kent has successfully relocated threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction.
Forgotten fathers: New dads also at risk for postpartum depression
UNLV study provides an in-depth look at new fathers' experiences with PPD.
Less-invasive procedure helps surgeons pinpoint epilepsy surgical candidates
A minimally invasive procedure to determine whether patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are candidates for brain surgery is safer, more efficient, and leads to better outcomes than the traditional method, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory catches lunar freeze frame
On March 6, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched a lunar transit in space -- one in which the satellite's path made the Moon appear to stand still, then backtrack.
Two for the price of one: Mechanistic insights lead to drug repositioning
A University of Tsukuba-led team confirmed that the binding of the cancer-promoting protein stratifin to phosphorylated SKP1 prevents the formation of a ubiquitinating enzyme complex.
Ocean life in 3D: Mapping phytoplankton with a smart AUV
Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain but are notoriously difficult for scientists to account for -- a little like trying to identify and count motes of dust in the air.
Design treatment of advanced metals producing better sculpting
A Purdue University team created a method for applying a designer surface-active agent to the surface of a metal to make it easier to cut and shape the material into parts and pieces.
Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior
Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.
Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah
Using a series of well-designed experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, a Princeton-led research team confirmed each step in a trophic cascade between the elimination of predators (including leopards, African wild dogs, and hyenas) and growth of local plants.
Probing water's skin
Electrosprays of water cannot reliably probe the air-water interface.
Potential treatment for cancer in butterfly disease
New research lays foundation for upcoming clinical trial for patients with epidermolysis bullosa.
The role of intuition in music performance
PHENICX, a project of the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme coordinated by Emilia Gómez, a researcher with the Musical Technology Research Group of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies at UPF, has attempted to create new digital experiences to enrich the experience of a classical music concert (before, during and after the concert itself) from different areas in order to bring classical music to new audiences in an innovative way and via technology.
Tiny DNA reader to advance development of anticancer drugs
Researchers at Osaka University have developed a novel method to determine exactly where anticancer drug molecules are incorporated into microscopic strands of DNA.
Australian study shows specialist clinics are cost-effective for chronic wound care
A study published in PLOS ONE by academics in Australia and the UK, shows that specialist wound management clinics are the most cost-effective route for the care of chronic wounds with better results for patients.
Women are more successful at crowdfunding than men, says ESMT Berlin study
Women have higher success rates at crowdfunding scientific projects than men, according to new research from ESMT Berlin.
'Meta-mirror' reflects sound waves in any direction
Researchers at Duke University have constructed a 'meta-mirror' device capable of perfectly reflecting sound waves in any direction.
Chatterpies, haggisters and ninuts could help children love conservation
Weaving stories and intriguing names into children's education about the natural world could help to engage them with species' conservation messages, new research shows.
Cell study reveals key mechanism linked to healthy development
Researchers have uncovered details of the role played by a key biological component involved in healthy cell development.
'Goldilocks' stars may be 'just right' for finding habitable worlds
A new study finds a particular class of stars called K stars, which are dimmer than the Sun but brighter than the faintest stars, may be particularly promising targets for searching for signs of life.
Elucidating cellular responses to force
Accumulated evidence suggests that physical force plays an important role in various developmental processes of fertilized animal eggs.
Pioneering research to deliver person-centred care
Researchers have developed a way to help people with progressive conditions receive better person-centred care.
Exotic synchronization patterns emerge in a simple network
From the power grid to the PTA, society relies on networks connected to other networks at scales from across the office to around the world.
Stressing and straining: Geochemists answer fundamental question of mineral reactions
In a new study from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists placed small iron oxide particles in an acidic solution, causing a reaction at the surface as iron atoms oxidized.
VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women
Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality.
How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow
Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold.
Antibiotics and PPIs linked to increased risk of infectious diarrhea in children
Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
Be nice to your doctor -- you may receive better care
Two new studies from a Tel Aviv University researcher find that positive interactions with patients drive improved medical team performance under most conditions, but positive interactions with professional superiors had no significant effect.
SGLT-2 inhibitors work by inducing a fasting state that triggers metabolic benefits
This research shows how SGLT-2 inhibitors induce a fasting state that triggers many metabolic benefits, including lowering of blood glucose, weight loss, a reduction of fat accumulation in the liver and reduced body fat.
At the limits of detectability
While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules with their environment.
A nap a day keeps high blood pressure at bay
It seems that napping may do more than just reboot our energy level and improve our mood.
E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression
Concerns about the addictive nature of e-cigarettes -- now used by an estimated 1 out of 20 Americans -- may only be part of the evolving public health story surrounding their use, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Potential new treatment for heart attack
Scientists have found a potential new drug for treating the heart damage caused by a heart attack by targeting the way the heart reacts to stress, according to new research published in the journal, Cell Stem Cell and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.
New research on the role of connectomics in brain development
Researchers are analyzing brain connectomes to understand how normal and abnormal interactions between functional brain networks affect healthy brain development and contribute to disorders such as epilepsy.
Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity
Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation.
Opioid misuse sending more older adults to emergency departments, study finds
Emergency department (ED) visits by people age 65 and older who were identified with opioid misuse and dependence more than tripled between 2006 and 2014, according to new research published by researchers at Towson University.
Promising new drug shows potential to stop progression of sepsis
Research into a new breakthrough therapy in the fight against sepsis has shown that the drug has potential to stop all sepsis-causing bacteria from triggering organ damage in the early stages of the condition.
Pediatric onset multiple sclerosis study examines baffling, often-overlooked disease
Study examines families' functioning when a child is diagnosed with pediatric onset multiple sclerosis.
Chemical hydrogen storage system
Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems.
Changes are needed in teaching medical residents how to communicate patient handoffs
End-of-shift handoffs are complex interactions influenced by many factors, and changes need to be made to prepare medical residents to successfully execute the transitions.
Researchers report high rate of viral suppression among people new to HIV care
Eighty-six percent of individuals who entered HIV care soon after diagnosis maintained viral suppression after 48 weeks during a clinical trial conducted at four National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs) across the United States.
What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?
A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds.
It's raining on the Greenland ice -- in the winter
Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study.
Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells
Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells.
Fireflies, heart beats, and the science of sync
New experiments in the 'science of sync' may ultimately lead to improved tools for controlling power grids and heart arrhythmias.
Getting a flu shot while hospitalized lowers the chance of a heart attack
There's now another reason to get your yearly flu shot.
Using precision medicine, researchers discover cause and treatment for specific lung disease
Researchers have identified that dysfunction of a specific immune cell, called B cells, underlies lung disease that affects patients with the rare immunological disorder known as common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).
Zero-emission diesel combustion using a non-equilibrium-plasma-assisted MnO2 filter
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have used ozone from an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma together with the desulfurization catalyst MnO2 to almost completely eliminate NOx and SOx from diesel exhaust gas at a low temperature of 473 K.
50 is the new 40 for safe childbirth, according to Ben-Gurion U. researchers
'It turns out that 50 is the new 40 when it comes to childbirth,' according to Dr.
Three ways studying organic chemistry changes the brain
A new study from Carnegie Mellon University researchers using multiple imaging modalities shows that learning scientific information results in changes in the actual structure of memory-related areas of the brain, changes due to the encoding of the new information in these memory-related brain areas, and changes in the coordination among the network nodes that jointly contain the new information.
Do rural populations experience greater worry and fatalism about cancer?
Researchers will answer that question today at the Society of Behavioral Medicine's 40th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions.
'Specialized' microbes within plant species promote diversity
A Yale-led research team conducted an experiment that suggests microbes can specialize within plant species, which can promote plant species diversity and increased seed dispersal.
Insects in decline: On farmland, latecomers lose out
Wild bees in Europe are in trouble -- more than 50 percent of local species are now classified as endangered.
Stars exploding as supernovae lose their mass to companion stars during their lives
Stars over eight times more massive than the sun end their lives in supernovae explosions.
Coral reef parks protecting only 40 percent of fish biomass potential
Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups examining the ecological status of coral reefs across the Indian and Pacific oceans have uncovered an unsettling fact: even the best coral reef marine parks contain less than half of the fish biomass found in the most remote reefs that lie far from human settlements.
How well do vaccines work? Research reveals measles vaccine efficacy
'What we found was a bit of a shock -- there are a very small number of studies that test whether vaccines are effective across multiple pathogen doses ...' said Langwig.
'Undruggable' Parkinson's molecule spills its secrets
UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder.
Gay and lesbian spaces in the city becoming more diverse, not going away
Gay and lesbian spaces in cities are dispersing and diversifying rather than disappearing, new University of British Columbia research has found.
New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships
Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park.
New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors
Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency.
How common is persistent opioid use after plastic, reconstructive surgery?
This study examined how common persistent opioid use was after plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures of the nose, eye, breast, abdomen and soft tissue.
When coral reefs change, researchers and local communities may not see eye to eye
Ecologists and local fishing populations may perceive major environmental shifts in fundamentally different ways.
Shifting away from coal is key to cutting greenhouse gas emissions, PSU study finds
The United States could fulfill its greenhouse gas emission pledge under the Paris Climate Agreement by virtually eliminating coal as an energy source by 2024, according to new research from Portland State University.
Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras
A new breakthrough by scientists with the University of Chicago may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras -- which in turn could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics like phones, as well as sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.
Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia
A total of 103 new species of weevils are added to the genus Trigonopterus from Sulawesi whereas.
Crystal-clear view of a key neuronal receptor opens door for new, targeted drugs
One of the most important protein signaling systems that controls neuronal guidance consists of the cell surface receptor 'Robo' and its cognate external guidance cue 'Slit.' The deficit of either of these proteins results in defects in brain structure and function.
The calypso caliphate: How Trinidad and Tobago became an ISIS recruiting hotspot
Research from the University of Kent has shed new light on individuals from Trinidad and Tobago that have traveled to Iraq and Syria to join ISIS since 2013, finding that they do not conform to the stereotypical Western view of an ISIS fighter.
The power of one country to influence treaty ratification
New research shows just how powerful the United States' and other countries' influence can be on persuading other nations to ratify international treaties.
Peeling back the data: NYS apple industry has larger economic impact
A Cornell University team has found that the economic impact of the apple industry in New York State is 21 percent larger than traditional models suggest.
Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions
Deciding when an athlete can return to the game after a head injury makes managing the treatment of sports-related concussions very complicated.
Deep brain stimulation sites for OCD target distinct symptoms
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces symptoms of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during stimulation of either the ventral capsule (VC) or anteromedial subthalamic nucleus (amSTN), according to a study in Biological Psychiatry.
Is dry eye disease associated with migraine headaches?
Dry eye disease is when tears can't adequately lubricate the eyes and patients may feel a stinging, burning or scratchy sensation.
SHANK3: the good, the bad and the hopeful
New approach brings a better understanding of Phelan-McDermid syndrome and SHANK3.
Landscapes of fear, and the large carnivores they feature, important in African ecosystems
A new study focused on Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, where entire populations of large-mammal predators were nearly extinguished during the Mozambican Civil War, illustrates how the loss of an ecosystem's top carnivores can have far-reaching consequences for prey and plant populations, turning 'landscapes of fear' into 'landscapes of fearlessness' in which emboldened herbivores graze and suppress plants.
Thyroid hormone helped our ancestors survive but left us susceptible
Although most victims survive the 735,000 heart attacks that occur annually in the US, their heart tissue is often irreparably damaged -- unlike many other cells in the body, once injured, heart cells cannot regenerate.
An antibody-mimicking small molecule protects mice against lethal influenza
Researchers present a newly identified small molecule influenza inhibitor, which, when administered orally, is capable of protecting mice from extremely lethal doses of influenza.
Success of university programs to promote rural healthcare in Japan
An ambitious health economics study from a consortium of 5 Japanese universities has shown that different university programs to promote the equal geographic distribution of physicians increases the number of graduates practicing in rural areas in Japan.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...