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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 08, 2019


Number and timing of pregnancies influence breast cancer risk for women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation
Researchers confirm the lower risk of breast cancer from multiple pregnancies and from breast feeding seen in average risk women extends to those at the highest risk of breast cancer, according to the largest prospective study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carriers to date.
Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity
A study led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has used eye-tracking techniques to analyse the processes of selective attention that determine the way in which we explore and interact with our environment.
A Georgia State cybersecurity study of the dark web exposes vulnerability to machine identities
A thriving marketplace for SSL and TLS certificates -- small data files used to facilitate confidential communication between organizations' servers and their clients' computers -- exists on a hidden part of the Internet, according to new research by Georgia State University's Evidence-Based Cybersecurity Research Group (EBCS) and the University of Surrey.
Alzheimer's: How does the brain change over the course of the disease?
What changes in the brain are caused by Alzheimer's disease?
The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties.
The chemistry behind kibble (video)
Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them?
New method of scoring protein interactions mines large data sets from a fresh angle
Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have created a novel way to define individual protein associations in a quick, efficient, and informative way.
Canadians' consumption of fruit and vegetables drops 13 per cent in 11 years
Two surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13-per-cent decrease in the amount of fruit and vegetables being consumed by Canadians, new University of British Columbia research has found.
Gene identified that increases risk of antibiotic reaction
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have identified a gene that increases the risk for a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction to the commonly prescribed antibiotic vancomycin.
At what age do you feel 65?
At what age do you feel 65? New study reveals wide variations in how well or poorly people age.
THOR wrangles complex microbiomes into a model for improving them
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin developed a community they named THOR, three species of bacteria isolated from soybean roots and grown together.
Atmospheric scientists reveal the effect of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming
Analyses indicate that Arctic amplification would not slow down until the 22nd and 23rd centuries.
Hookah smokers are inhaling toxic chemicals that may harm the heart
Smoking tobacco in hookahs results in inhaling significant levels of toxic chemicals, such as carbon monoxide, and particulates from tobacco that can harm blood vessels and the heart.
Listening to quantum radio
Researchers at Delft University of Technology have created a quantum circuit that enables them to listen to the weakest radio signal allowed by quantum mechanics.
Sewage reveals levels of antimicrobial resistance worldwide
Sewage can reveal the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria among healthy populations, an international study led by the Technical University of Denmark shows.
New method opens the way for cutting tools with longer lifetime
Researchers at Linköping University have developed a theoretical model that enables simulations for showing what happens in hard cutting materials as they degrade.
The ABS of molecular engines
Peroxisomes are cell organelles that carry out a number of functions, including the degradation of cytotoxins.
New gene hunt reveals potential breast cancer treatment target
Australian and US researchers have developed a way to discover elusive cancer-promoting genes, already identifying one that appears to promote aggressive breast cancers.
Endocrine Society commends reinvigorated effort to regulate chemicals in personal care products
The Endocrine Society applauded the reintroduction of a Senate bill that would give government regulators needed authority to protect consumers from exposure to hazardous endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in cosmetics and other personal care products.
Trading cryptocurrency is problematic for regular gamblers, Rutgers study says
Researchers at the Center for Gambling Studies at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have found a link between frequently trading cryptocurrency -- a digital and virtual currency -- and problem gambling.
Biologists have studied enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi
Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi.
EPFL researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear
Using high-performance computer simulations, EPFL researchers were able to observe how surface roughness changes when two materials rub together.
Good grief: Victimized employees don't get a break
As if being picked on wasn't bad enough, victims of workplace mistreatment may also be seen as bullies themselves, even if they've never engaged in such behavior.
Illuminating the genome
Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes.
Vitamin D may protect against pollution-associated asthma symptoms in obese children
A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution.
Study confirms horseshoe crabs are really relatives of spiders, scorpions
By analyzing troves of genetic data and considering a vast number of possible ways to examine it, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists now have a high degree of confidence that horseshoe crabs do indeed belong within the arachnids.
NASA finds wind shear adversely affecting Haleh
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed northerly wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone Haleh and continuing to weaken the storm.
Small animals with big impact
Copepods, the world's most common animal, release unique substances into the oceans.
Study: Urban African-Americans more likely to live in trauma deserts
A new study from the University of Chicago Medicine shows African-American communities were the only racial/ethnic group to have consistent disparities in geographic access to trauma centers.
Music captivates listeners and synchronizes their brainwaves
Music has the ability to captivate us; when listeners engage with music, they follow its sounds closely, connecting to what they hear in an affective and invested way.
Hubble's dazzling display of 2 colliding galaxies
Located in the constellation of Hercules, about 230 million light-years away, NGC 6052 is a pair of colliding galaxies first discovered in 1784.
Researchers unveil progress and challenges in introducing typhoid conjugate vaccine in Africa/Asia
Each year there are nearly 11 million cases of typhoid, a disease that is spread through contaminated food, drink and water.
Study: Life-saving antibiotic receives new use guidelines from researchers around world
An international panel of the foremost researchers on infectious disease and antimicrobials has formed new guidelines on the use of polymyxins, a class of antibiotics employed as a last resort to treat deadly, drug-resistant bacteria.
Improving researchers' abilities to forecast epidemics
An annual influenza season forecasting challenge issued by the US Centers for Disease Control provides unique insight into epidemic forecasting, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
Endocrine Society celebrates International Women's Day with special thematic issue
The Endocrine Society is commemorating International Women's day with its March 2019 Woman in Endocrinology Collection, a special online thematic issue of peer-reviewed journal articles.
Disparities in access to trauma centers
An analysis of census tract data for neighborhoods in America's three largest cities suggests black-majority neighborhoods are associated with disparities in access to trauma centers.
NASA's LRO sheds light on lunar water movement
Scientists using an instrument aboard LRO observed water molecules moving around the dayside of the moon.
Interdisciplinary team discovers double helix structure in synthetic macromolecule
Discovery comes as an extension of the development of a polymer ion-gel, which promises to outperform conventional flammable liquid battery electrolytes.
Zinc could help as non-antibiotic treatment for UTIs
New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs).
Study: Impact of food waste campaigns muted, but point toward right direction
Food waste campaigns are a low-cost way to curb waste at all-you-can-eat dining establishments, but they may need to be combined with other environmental changes to make a difference, says new research co-written by Brenna Ellison, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at Illinois.
CO2 mineralization in geologically common rocks for carbon storage
An international research team led by Kyushu University modeled CO2 mineralization on a quartz (SiO2) surface to study the dynamics of geological trapping.
Why you lose hearing for a while after listening to loud sounds
When we listen to loud sounds, our hearing may become impaired for a short time.
Precision drugs could unmask cancers to immune system and boost effects of immunotherapy
Precision cancer drugs called PARP inhibitors have a previously unknown ability to boost the immune system, and could help many more patients benefit from immunotherapy, a new study reveals.
Pheromones and social status: Machos smell better
Male house mice are territorial and scent-mark their territories with urine -- and dominant, territorial males have much greater reproductive success than other males.
Is it ever too late for adults to benefit from physical activity?
It may never be too late for adults to become physically active and enjoy some health benefits.
SwRI-led LAMP instrument sheds light on lunar water movement
Using the Southwest Research Institute-led Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), scientists have observed water molecules moving around the dayside of the Moon.
Blood holds key to liver regeneration
The liver is the only organ in the body that can regenerate.
Potential way to improve cancer surgery outcomes by managing nontraditional risk factors
In a study of 142 patients preparing for cancer surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that psychological or social risk factors such as depression, limited resilience and lack of emergency resources along with standard medical risk factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes are linked with higher risks of surgical complications.
Research suggests adoption assessment tool lags behind societal changes
A UBC researcher says a tool to assess potential adoptive parents does not meet the needs of lesbian, gay or gender minority adults.
Scientists discover a potential strategy to treat influenza A
A team of researchers from Scripps Research and Janssen Research & Development LLC has discovered an orally active small molecule that neutralizes influenza A group 1 viruses, the most common flu strains.
Kepler Space Telescope's first exoplanet candidate confirmed
An international team of astronomers announced the confirmation of the first exoplanet candidate identified by NASA's Kepler Mission.
Fear of hospitalization keeps men from talking about suicide
Fear of psychiatric hospitalization is one of the primary reasons that older men -- an age and gender group at high risk for suicide -- don't talk about suicide with their physicians.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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#520 A Closer Look at Objectivism
This week we broach the topic of Objectivism. We'll be speaking with Keith Lockitch, senior fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute, about the philosophy of Objectivism as it's taught through Ayn Rand's writings. Then we'll speak with Denise Cummins, cognitive scientist, author and fellow at the Association for Psychological Science, about the impact of Objectivist ideology on society. Related links: This is what happens when you take Ayn Rand seriously Another Critic Who Doesn’t Care What Rand Thought or Why She Thought It, Only That She’s Wrong Quote is from "A Companion to Ayn Rand"