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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 12, 2019


One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create.
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable.
Two papers describe how a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions
The TMEM16 family of membrane proteins was hailed as representing the elusive calcium-activated chloride channels.
Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave.
Mowing for monarchs
You might think that mowing fields wouldn't benefit monarch butterfly populations.
Follow-up of children for asthma after vitamin D supplementation in moms during pregnancy
This research letter reports on the follow-up of children for asthma whose mothers participated in a randomized clinical trial where they received high-dose vitamin D (2,400 IU/day) during the 24th week of pregnancy or placebo plus the recommended dose of 400 IU/day of vitamin D.
Researchers show how coffee growers can optimize profits, sustainably
First study to quantify economic trade-offs of shifting from conventional to shade-grown coffee production.
WVU researchers explore stroke's effects on microbiome
Researchers in the WVU School of Medicine are investigating how having a stroke can disrupt the community of bacteria that lives in the gut.
UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now...
The UK's wild newt populations seem to be free from a flesh-eating lethal fungus known to be prevalent in privately-owned amphibians across Western Europe, a nationwide investigation has found.
Some children can 'recover' from autism, but problems often remain
Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition.
Speedy 'slingshot' cell movement observed for the first time
By slingshotting themselves forward, human cells can travel more than five times faster than previously documented.
HSS orthopedic surgeons address opioid epidemic head on
Orthopedic surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) have developed a pain management pathway designed to reduce the use of opioid analgesics after joint replacement surgery.
Gene behind long-recognized mitochondrial disease has highly varied effects
Mutations in the mitochondrial gene mt-ATP6, which encodes an essential part of the mitochondrial motor known as ATP synthase that generates cellular energy, are much more variable than previously thought.
Movie technology inspires wearable liquid unit that aims to harvest energy
The Purdue team created wearable technology to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy.
Air pollution causes 800,000 extra deaths a year in Europe and 8.8 million worldwide
Air pollution could be causing double the number of extra deaths a year in Europe than has been estimated previously, according to a study published in the European Heart Journal.
Profiling immune system in pediatric arthritis patients offers hope for improved diagnosis and treatment
A team of scientists from VIB and KU Leuven has developed a machine learning algorithm that identifies children with juvenile arthritis with almost 90 percent accuracy from a simple blood test.
UNH researchers create a hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have created a hydrogel that could one day be made into a contact lens to more effectively treat corneal melting, a condition that is a significant cause for blindness world-wide.
Treatment guidelines for breast implant-associated lymphoma (BIA-ALCL)
Recent study formalizes the treatment strategy for this diagnosis, offering clear guidelines for plastic and oncologic surgeons.
Was diet quality in midlife associated with later risk for dementia?
The quality of diet for adults in midlife (average age 50) wasn't associated with later risk of dementia in a study that included adults followed for more than two decades. Other observational studies have suggested diet may be linked to cognitive health but those studies often had short follow-up periods that could not cover the long preclinical period before dementia diagnosis.
Little owls on the move
New study on an owl's re-colonization of northern Switzerland.
Coal power stations disrupt rainfall: global study
Modern coal-fired power stations produce more ultrafine dust particles than road traffic and can even modify and redistribute rainfall patterns, a new 15-year international study shows.
Individualized model could help guide treatment of non-metastatic prostate cancer
A new risk model, easily accessible on a web interface, can predict the survival of non-metastatic prostate cancer patients, as well as the effect of different treatment approaches on survival.
A new therapeutic target for blocking early atherosclerosis in progeria
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares and the Universidad de Oviedo have discovered a new molecular mechanism involved in the premature development of atherosclerosis in mice with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.
Light provides control for 3D printing with multiple materials
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a novel 3D printer that uses patterns of visible and ultraviolet light to dictate which of two monomers are polymerized to form a solid material.
These less common proteins may help fend off the flu
Influenza type B, though generally less widespread than type A, poses a formidable threat for vulnerable populations like the elderly and the young.
Fear center in the brain protects against illusions
If functionality of the brain's amygdala is impaired, illusory perceptions arise much faster and more pronounced.
Immigration is beneficial to economies, even after 100 years
A new paper published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that US counties with more historical immigration have higher incomes, less poverty, and lower unemployment today.
Asteroid Bennu, target of NASA's sample return mission, is rotating faster over time
OSIRIS-REx finds Bennu's rotation period is speeding up by about 1 second every 100 years, according to a new study the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Stanford researchers outline the role of a deep brain structure in concussion
Through a combination of biometric tracking, simulated modeling and medical imaging, researchers detail how hits to the side of the head cause concussion.
Researchers decode how cancer drug works in brains of Parkinson's disease patients
The first arm of a phase II clinical trial by a research team at Georgetown University Medical Center testing the use of nilotinib in patients with Parkinson's disease demonstrates precisely how the agent increases levels of dopamine in the brains of study participants.
Discovery upturns understanding of how some viruses multiply
Scientists have shown that different segments of a virus genome can exist in distinct cells but work together to cause an infection.
Study suggests hip replacement patients can skip hip precautions
Low-risk patients undergoing a total hip replacement with a posterior approach can skip the standard hip precautions currently recommended for post-surgical recovery, according to a study conducted at Hospital for Special Surgery.
GE, Feinstein Institute demonstrate use of ultrasound to alter inflammatory and metabolic response
GE Research and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research bioelectronic medicine teams have demonstrated potentially breakthrough noninvasive methods to regulate dysfunction in the body's metabolic or inflammatory control systems using ultrasound.
New contributor to age-related hearing loss identified
Researchers have discovered a new potential contributor to age-related hearing loss, a finding that could help doctors identify people at risk and better treat the condition.
Non-contrast MRI is effective in monitoring MS patients
Brain MRI without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach for monitoring disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study.
New species of frog sheds light on major biodiversity hotspot in southern India
An expedition to an isolated hill range located in Southern India along one of the top biodiversity hotspots in the world led to the discovery of a new, ancient lineage of frog endemic to the area, according to a study published today in the journal PeerJ.
CU Anschutz study offers clues for why birth control may fail
Women who get pregnant while using birth control may carry a gene that breaks down the hormones common in contraceptives, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Your body is your internet -- and now it can't be hacked
Purdue University engineers have tightened security on the 'internet of body.' Now, the network you didn't know you had is only accessible by you and your devices, thanks to technology that keeps communication signals within the body itself.
Cancer imaging technology can help reveal life-threatening pregnancy disorder
An imaging technique used to detect some forms of cancer can also help detect preeclampsia in pregnancy before it becomes a life-threatening condition, a new Tulane study says.
Scientists find first evidence for necessary role of the human hippocampus in planning
A team of scientists reports finding the first evidence that the human hippocampus is necessary for future planning.
The Lancet: Disease, violence and inequality threaten more adolescents worldwide than ever before
In the first study to track recent global changes to adolescent health, published in The Lancet, researchers estimate that, compared with 1990, an additional 250 million adolescents in 2016 were living in countries where they faced a triple burden of infectious disease, non-communicable diseases including obesity, and injuries -- including from violence.
Engaging in physical activity could reduce long-term mortality
This study has been published in the prestigious journal of Mayo Clinic Proceedings and is part of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid cohort, a representative cohort of the non-institutionalized population aged 60 years and older in Spain.
Elucidation of structural property in Li-ion batteries that deliver ultra-fast charging
Scientists at Tokyo Tech and Okayama University found a way of greatly improving the performance of LiCoO2 cathodes in Li-ion batteries by decorating them with BaTiO3 nanodots.
First double-blind controlled trial of TNS shows reduced symptoms in some children with ADHD
Currently approved in Canada and Europe for adults with medication-resistant depression and seizures, trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has been found to be an effective and safe means of treatment for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), reports a study published in the April 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
Boston Children's Hospital announces results of Bridge-Enhanced® ACL repair study
Today researchers at Boston Children's Hospital announce encouraging Phase I results from a first-of-its-kind study - repairing ACL tears by helping the ligament regrow itself.
Autonomous vehicles could be an environmental boon or disaster, depending on public policy
Widespread use of autonomous vehicles (AVs) could either massively increase or drastically cut greenhouse gas emissions depending, in large part, on public policy, according to new research from Princeton University.
The ups and downs of sit-stand desks
With researchers suggesting that 'sitting is the new smoking,' sit-stand desks (SSD) have become a common tool to quell sedentary behavior in an office environment.
Artificial intelligence cuts lung cancer screening false positives
Right now, 96 percent of people who screen positive for lung cancer don't actually have a malignant growth.
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest third leading cause of disease-related health loss
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was the third leading cause of 'health loss due to disease' in the United States behind ischemic heart disease and low back/neck pain in 2016.
Researchers improve description of defective oxides with first principles calculation
Understanding how defects can affect ground-state properties, promote phase transitions, or enable entirely new functionalities in some strongly correlated oxides has become a subject of major interest in the field of design and discovery of novel functional materials.
Structural Heart features studies on ASD closure and disparities in Watchman device access
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team features original research articles on readmissions after atrial septal defect (ASD) closure and socioeconomic disparities in access to the Watchman device in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).
Problem drinking linked to HIV, other sexually transmitted infections in Ugandan youth, study finds
Youth living in the slums of Uganda who are infected with both HIV and sexually transmitted infections are more likely to engage in problem drinking, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
Meet India's starry dwarf frog, lone member of newly discovered ancient lineage
The starry dwarf frog is an expert hider. Plunging into leaf litter at the slightest disturbance, it has successfully evaded attention for millions of years -- until now.
Subsidies for infection control to healthcare institutions help reduce infection levels
Researchers compared three types of infection control subsidies and found that under a limited budget, a dollar-for-dollar matching subsidy, in which policymakers match hospital spending for infection control measures, was the most effective at reducing the number of hospital-acquired infections.
What scientists found after sifting through dust in the solar system
Two recent studies report discoveries of dust rings in the inner solar system: a dust ring at Mercury's orbit, and a group of never-before-detected asteroids co-orbiting with Venus, supplying the dust in Venus' orbit.
Web tool aims to better inform and refine need for treatment in early prostate cancer
A new tool to predict an individual's prognosis following a prostate cancer diagnosis could help prevent unnecessary treatment and related side effects, say researchers at the University of Cambridge.
The world's adolescents -- large unmet needs and growing inequalities
The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender inequity is a powerful driver of poor adolescent health.
Climate Change: Heat-induced heart attack risk on the rise
Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is the number one cause of death worldwide.
Administration budget proposal undermined by concurrent cuts
The White House budget proposal for 2020 recommends increases to the domestic HIV programs at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration and Indian Health Services that will be essential to keeping the administration's promise of ending our nation's HIV epidemic in the next decade.
Secrets of early life revealed from less than half a teaspoon of blood
A global team of scientists have mapped the developmental pathway of a newborn's life for the first time.
Revamping science: Making room for more voices
Science is known for being objective and apolitical, but is it?
Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance, Mason research shows
A new study from the George Mason University Arts Research Center and published in the journal Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school.
A lawn is better than fertilizer for growing healthy blueberries
A new study shows that growing grasses alongside blueberry plants corrects signs of iron deficiency, with associated improvements in berry quantity and quality.
Scientists go to extremes to reveal make-up of Earth's core
Experiments conducted at extreme conditions are giving scientists new insights into the chemical make-up of the Earth's core.
Neurofeedback gets you back in the zone
Columbia Engineering researchers have shown--for the first time--that they can use online neurofeedback to modify an individual's arousal state to improve performance in a demanding sensory motor task, such as flying a plane or driving in suboptimal conditions.
BAT's novel vaping product shows minimal toxicity in laboratory tests
A series of in vitro toxicology tests provide evidence that British American Tobacco's novel vaping product produces greatly reduced mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and effects on wound healing as compared to cigarette smoke.
How intelligent is artificial intelligence?
Scientists are putting AI systems to a test. Researchers from TU Berlin, Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have developed a method to provided a glimpse into the diverse 'intelligence' spectrum observed in current AI systems, specifically analyzing these AI systems with a novel technology that allows automatized analysis and quantification.
Experiences of nature boost children's learning
Spending time in nature boosts children's academic achievement and healthy development, concludes a new analysis examining hundreds of studies.
NUS study: Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline
Researchers from the National University of Singapore found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 percent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment.
Dementia looks different in brains of Hispanics
A major new study from the UC Davis Alzheimer's Center has uncovered dramatic differences in the brains of Hispanics with a dementia diagnosis compared with those of non-Hispanic whites and of African Americans.
Researchers create SAMβA, a new molecule to treat heart failure
This innovation has been developed by researchers based in Brazil and the US.
Breath of fresh air in vasculitis research
A University of Tsukuba-led research team revealed that a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter of the MUC5B gene encoding a mucin 5B confers susceptibility to interstitial lung disease (ILD) in Japanese patients suffering from antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV).
Small babies, big data
The first week of a newborn's life is a time of rapid biological change as the baby adapts to living outside the womb, suddenly exposed to new bacteria and viruses.
Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids
Eliminating ASCT2 selectively stops the growth of leukemia cells, while having limited effects on healthy blood cells and hematopoetic (blood-forming) stem cells.
Opioid crisis: Only a US phenomenon?
Addiction to prescription opioids has reached a crisis level in the United States.
Mapping the effects of guns, snares and bulldozers on biodiversity
New research publishing March 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology reveals that human threats -- like hunting and land clearing -- are extensive across thousands of species' habitats, severely limiting the area they can survive in.
Desert plants provided by homeowners offer habitat for desert bird species
A persistent question among urban ecology researchers has been the long-term impact of urbanization on bird species biodiversity.
Lower costs associated with late-preterm steroid therapy, NIH-funded analysis finds
An analysis of a previous study has found more evidence to support giving the steroid betamethasone to pregnant women at risk of late-preterm delivery (between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation), according to a network funded by the National Institutes of Health.
Tropical Cyclone Idai seen in Mozambique channel by NASA's Terra Satellite
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and caught a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Idai in the Mozambique Channel.
Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium
University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures.
Scientists release global wildlife map of 'cool-spots' and 'hot-spots'
A new study maps the last vestiges of wild places where the world's threatened species can take refuge from the ravages of unregulated hunting, land clearing, and other industrial activities.
Iron measurements with MRI reveal stroke's impact on brain
A simple MRI method that measures iron content can provide a more comprehensive picture of the consequences of stroke-related damage to the brain, according to a new study.
A model for more efficient use of resources after joint replacement surgery
Patients who live close to the hospital at which they have had a hip or knee replacement are much more likely to visit the emergency room for follow-up care of pain, inflammation and other complaints than those who live farther away, according to a new study.
Tied in knots: New insights into plasma behavior focus on twists and turns
Findings from an international team of scientists show that twisted magnetic fields can evolve in only so many ways, with the plasma inside them following a general rule.
Brain scans help unravel the neurobiology of functional neurological (conversion) disorder
An investigation led by a team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital departments of Neurology, Psychiatry and Radiology has found altered connectivity among brain regions that handle sensorimotor, emotional and cognitive signaling in patients with functional neurological disorder, a common condition involving neurologic symptoms that have no readily apparent physical cause.
Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'
Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms.
Adolescents are more likely than adults to use fruit- and candy-flavored e-cigarettes
As the FDA looks for more information on e-cigarettes and e-juice flavors, a new Dartmouth study shows that adolescents and young adults cite appealing flavors as a main reason for using e-cigarettes, that they are more likely to turn to fruit- and candy-flavored cigarettes than adult smokers trying to quit who more commonly prefer tobacco flavors, and that the younger population are likely to use multiple e-cigarette flavors at the same time.
At 3,836 mph, which way does the air flow?
UB aerospace engineer James Chen publishes a paper that extends classical kinetic theory into high-speed aerodynamics, including hypersonic speed, which begins at 3,836 mph or roughly five times the speed of sound.
Easier nicotine vaping product access likely to improve health and reduce health costs
Easier access to e-cigarettes containing nicotine is highly likely to lead to health gains and cost savings in the health sector, Australian and New Zealand researchers have found.
The nearer the friends, the stronger the regional identity
Satisfaction of young people increases when they can identify with the region in which they live.
Scientists discover key enzyme in breast cancer proliferation, treatment resistance
UNC School of Medicine scientists uncovered a possible reason why some breast cancers are so aggressive and difficult to treat: an enzyme called USP21 promotes proliferation of basal-like breast cancer and is upregulated in a significant percentage of patient tumors.
Most deaths in children aged 5 to 14 in India, China, Brazil, Mexico are preventable
Most deaths of children aged five to 14 in India, China, Brazil and Mexico arise from preventable or treatable conditions, suggests a new study published today in The Lancet.
Infertility is linked to small increased risk of cancer
A study of over 64,000 women of childbearing age in the USA has found that infertility is associated with a higher risk of developing cancer compared to a group of over three million women without fertility problems, although the absolute risk is very low at just 2 percent.
No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both
A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila.
Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics
In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria present initial approaches to how the spread of antibiotic resistances can be prevented in hospitals.
CT scan prior to spine fusion finds almost half of patients had undiagnosed osteoporosis
For patients contemplating spinal fusion surgery to alleviate pain, bone health is an important consideration.
From Stone Age chips to microchips: How tiny tools may have made us human
Anthropologists have long made the case that tool-making is one of the key behaviors that separated our human ancestors from other primates.
Teachers 'scarred' by legacy of 1988 anti-LGBT+ law
LGBT+ teachers who taught in schools during the late 1980s and 1990s remain scarred by the effects of Section 28 of the Local Government Act in England -- a piece of legislation introduced in 1988 banning the 'promotion' of homosexuality in schools -- according to new research published in the journal Sex Education.
Results of early-stage liver cancer detection using liquid biopsy published in PNAS
Genetron Health Co. Ltd and National Cancer Center/ Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences published the promising results of their liver cancer early screening study using cell free DNA and protein biomarkers.
Big data takes aim at a big human problem
A James Cook University scientist is part of an international team that's used new 'big data' analysis to achieve a major advance in understanding neurological disorders such as Epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?
A new study published in Physical Review Letters by Prof.
Machine-learning model provides detailed insight on proteins
A novel machine-learning 'toolbox' that can read and analyse the sequences of proteins has been described today in the open-access journal eLife.
New technique reveals big data from tiny babies
An international research team co-led by the University of British Columbia has pioneered a technique to get huge amounts of data from a tiny amount of newborn blood -- less than a quarter teaspoon -- allowing for the most comprehensive data analysis yet.
Health inequality threatening more adolescents worldwide than ever before
A global study of the health and well being of the world's 1.8 billion adolescents reveals a growing inequality -- and greater health challenges than those faced 25 years ago.
Probability of catastrophic geomagnetic storm lower than estimated
According to a group of mathematics researchers, the probability in the following decade of the sun causing a storm strong enough to affect electrical and communication infrastructures around the globe 'only' reaches 1.9 percent maximum.
Adding docetaxel-based chemotherapy to standard treatment for high-risk prostate cancer
Researchers theorized that adding adjuvant docetaxel, a cytotoxic chemotherapy drug, to the standard of care RT and long-term AS treatment could potentially improve overall survival and clinical outcomes for men with localized, high-risk prostate cancer.
Targeting stem-like cells could prevent ovarian cancer recurrence
A new drug takes out the 'seeds' that cause ovarian cancer to come back after chemotherapy.
Amorous planthopper bugs shake abdomen 'snapping organ' to attract mates
Planthopper bugs may be small, but they attract mates from afar by sending vibrational calls along plant stems and leaves using fast, rhythmic motions of their abdomen.
Scientists identify gene that keeps PTSD-like behavior at bay in female mice
More than 30 years ago, scientists discovered that mad cow and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases are caused by prions.
Speaking with a robot is not as pleasant as talking to a human
Scientists employed fMRI to record the brain activity of participants speaking with another human or with a robot.
Genetically encoded sensor isolates hidden leukemic stem cells
Tel Aviv University researchers have devised a novel biosensor that can isolate and target leukemic stem cells.
FSU researchers discover a novel protein degradation pathway
A Florida State University research team how a type of protein that is embedded in the inner nuclear membrane clears out of the system once it has served its purpose.
Study finds IV and pill form of acetaminophen work equally well after hip replacement
Pain management after surgery is a vital part of patient care.
Watching for 'bright lines' during the Trump presidency
For the past year and a half, Bright Line Watch, a non-partisan group of political scientists, has been surveying the American public and exports to gauge the state of the nation's democracy.
Mixed-cation perovskite solar cells in space
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) exhibiting outstanding efficiency, high power-per-weight, and excellent radiation resistance are considered to be the new-generation energy technology for space application.
New lung cancer studies feature latest treatment advances
New research released today provides guidance for physicians who treat patients with lung cancer.
UM study suggests climate change limits forest recovery after wildfires
New University of Montana research suggests climate change makes it increasingly difficult for tree seedlings to regenerate following wildfires in low-elevation forests, which could contribute to abrupt forest loss.
Study reviews the potential impacts of future heat waves on humans and wildlife
Climate change is often talked about in terms of averages, like the goal set by the Paris Agreement to limit the Earth's temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius.
Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products
A recent study by researchers at the Estonian University of Life Sciences, Ghend, and Cardiff University found that the toxins used in agriculture to combat insect pests and fungi can be more dangerous than expected.
OU neuroscientists find brain pathway supporting an intersection of taste and pain
University of Oklahoma neuroscientists have found a pathway in the brain where taste and pain intersect in a new study that originally was designed to look at the intersection of taste and food temperature.
IU School of Medicine researchers develop groundbreaking test for PTSD
Researchers from the IU School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry have developed a groundbreaking blood test that could help more accurately diagnose those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.
Spine evaluation is critical to reduce dislocations in revision total hip arthroplasty
A new assessment tool before revision hip replacement surgery has significantly reduced the rate of recurrent dislocations compared to a standard evaluation, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery.
Review of noise impacts on marine mammals yields new policy recommendations
Marine mammals are particularly sensitive to noise pollution because they rely on sound for so many essential functions, including communication, navigation, finding food, and avoiding predators.

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