Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 15, 2019


Artificial intelligence speeds up!
A group at Politecnico di Milano has developed an electronic circuit able to solve a system of linear equations in a single operation in the timescale of few tens of ns.
Design and validation of world-class multilayered thermal emitter using machine learning
NIMS, the University of Tokyo, Niigata University and RIKEN jointly designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation).
NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Idai over Mozambique
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone continued to move in a westerly direction after making landfall in Mozambique.
Cardiovascular screenings uncover diabetes, high cholesterol in middle schoolers
A pilot study of 45 middle school kids shows that more than a third of those screened had abnormal levels of blood sugar or high cholesterol.
Seeing through a robot's eyes helps those with profound motor impairments
An interface system that uses augmented reality technology could help individuals with profound motor impairments operate a humanoid robot to feed themselves and perform routine personal care tasks such as scratching an itch and applying skin lotion.
What is the real link between bacterial vaginosis and HIV risk in women?
An international team of researchers presents a comprehensive and renewed focus on the common, yet poorly understood condition of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and how the microbial make-up of the vagina can affect a woman's risk of acquiring HIV and AIDS.
Disclosure of religious identity, health care practices on Catholic hospital websites
Some patients seek care at Catholic hospitals but others may not because aspects of reproductive and end-of-life care can be limited by ethical and religious directives for Catholic hospitals based on the church's moral teachings.
Russian scientists have determined indicators of stress development in the human body
In today's life, we often encounter situations when the organism's functions are overstrained, and the action of extreme factors causes the development of a stress response.
AI and MRIs at birth can predict cognitive development at age 2, UNC study finds
Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine used MRI brain scans and machine learning techniques at birth to predict cognitive development at age 2 years with 95 percent accuracy.
The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed
An international study co-led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) and Harvard University (USA) has developed a genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula covering the last 8,000 years.
With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight
People left blind by retinal degeneration have one option: electronic eye implants.
Ablation better than drugs for reducing Afib, improving QOL, but not for reducing death
Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that affects an estimated 30 million people worldwide.
Bad news for egg lovers
Cancel the cheese omelet. A large, new study of nearly 30,000 people reports adults who ate more eggs and dietary cholesterol had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause.
Surgery no better than medication at preventing serious complications of atrial fibrillation
Catheter ablation, a common cardiovascular procedure, appears no more effective than drug therapies in preventing strokes, deaths, and other complications in patients with atrial fibrillation.
Study reveals how motivation affects nutrition and diet
New research led by the University of East Anglia suggests that people with a positive attitude are more likely to eat healthily.
Researchers measure near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors
Stanford researchers redefine what it means for low-cost semiconductors, called quantum dots, to be near-perfect and find that quantum dots meet quality standards set by more expensive alternatives.
Even younger nightshift workers shown to need to pee more, worsening quality of life
Millions of people work nights, but increasingly scientists are finding that night work is associated with health problems.
Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected
A USDA Forest Service scientist and 29 co-authors completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests.
New wheel units could bring vehicle costs down
Vehicles could be affordably produced for a wide variety of specialized purposes using a sophisticated wheel unit developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo.
Trials testing new educational methods in schools 'often fail to produce useful evidence'
The new study found that 40% of large-scale randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the UK and the US failed to produce any evidence as to whether an educational intervention helped to boost academic attainment or not.
Sweat holds most promise for noninvasive testing
University of Cincinnati professor Jason Heikenfeld and his students have been creating new sensors on a wearable patch the size of a Band-Aid that stimulates sweat even when a patient is cool and resting.
Children's noses hold clues to serious lung infections, study shows
Tiny organisms in a child's nose could offer clues to improving the diagnosis and treatment of severe lung infections, research shows.
Current training of physicians to care for LGBTQ individuals is falling short
Not enough is being done to prepare physicians to care for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients.
Study shows most Catholic hospitals don't advertise religious restrictions on health care
In a survey of Catholic hospitals throughout the country, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus found many did not advertise their religious affiliation and the majority did not explain how that affiliation results in health care restrictions.
Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields
A new technique developed at MIT uses quantum sensors to enable precise measurements of magnetic fields in different directions.
Periodontitis may raise the risk for developing dementia
Gum disease (gingivitis) that goes untreated can become periodontitis, causing loss in the bone that supports your teeth.
Enzyme USP15 may have potential role in future treatment of various cancers
A team at the George Washington University Cancer Center found that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP15 is a potential biomarker for treatments of pancreatic cancer, as well as ovarian and breast cancers.
Oscillation in muscle tissue
When a muscle grows or a muscle injury heals, some of the stem cells develop into new muscle cells.
Discovery of atrial fibrillation subtypes paves way for precision medicine
The discovery of subtypes of atrial fibrillation paves the way for individualized treatment.
Light physical activity associated with reduced risk of heart disease in older women
An observational study of  nearly 5,900 older women (ages 50 to 79) that used data from accelerometers to measure light physical activity suggests all movement during the day may have a role in reducing risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Heart procedure for AFib better than drug therapy for reducing episodes, improving quality of life and symptoms, but not for reducing death or stroke
The 33 million people with atrial fibrillation worldwide not only suffer from bothersome symptoms, but also face a fivefold increased risk of stroke and a twofold increased risk of death.
Light physical activity linked to lower risk of heart disease in older women
Light physical activity such as gardening, strolling through a park, and folding clothes might be enough to significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among women 63 and older, a new study has found.
A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease
After the war is over, veterans face a new threat.
Diabetics more likely to experience high blood sugar after joint surgery
People with diabetes who have joint replacement surgery are at sharply higher risk of experiencing elevated blood sugar after the procedure, and this could increase their chances of developing a complication, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).
Strength training may reduce the risk of diabetes in obesity
Strength training over a short time period can reduce fat stores in the liver and improve blood glucose control in obese mice, according to a study published in the Journal of Endocrinology.
Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses
Dysregulation of the signaling pathway known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt can also cause embryo malformation and contribute for the development of breast and cervical cancer.
New proof that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered autoreactive cells in persons suffering from narcolepsy.
A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells.
Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing
A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.
Since 1990s, heart attacks have become less deadly, frequent for Americans
Heart attack prevention and outcomes have dramatically improved for American adults in the past two decades, according to a Yale study in JAMA Network Open.
Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Savannah moving away from Indonesia
Tropical Cyclone Savannah continued to move in southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean, and move away from Indonesia.
How to catch ovarian cancer earlier
Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed too late for effective treatment.
For older adults, sense of control tied to feeling younger
A recent study finds that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns.
NASA sees development of Tropical Depression 03W near Yap
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed 03W that formed near the island of Yap in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
Precision medicine for pediatric cancer
In a perspectives article published in the prestigious journal Science, Dr.
Cross-regional study of Russian teachers' attitudes towards cultural diversity
Many countries today face the difficulties of teaching kids of religious and ethnic minorities.
Nursing work environment shapes relationship between EHR & quality of care
In the decade since the federal government's electronic health record (EHR) initiatives first became law, nearly all US hospitals have adopted some form of EHR technology.
Opioid prescribing across United States
National and state trends for opioid prescriptions filled at US retail pharmacies are estimated from 2006 through 2017 in this analysis of data from outpatient prescribing records. Each year an average of nearly 234 million opioid prescriptions were filled.
Our brains may ripple before remembering
In a study of epilepsy patients, researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that split seconds before we recall past experiences tiny electrical waves, called ripples, may flow through key parts of our brains that help store our memories, setting the stage for successful retrieval.
Few treatment guidelines for heart disease are based on rigorous study
Less than 10 percent of the treatment recommendations US doctors rely on to manage care for heart patients are based on evidence gained from multiple large, randomized clinical trials -- the gold standard for obtaining scientific data.
What is association of dietary cholesterol or eating eggs with risk of cardiovascular disease, death?
Eggs are a source of dietary cholesterol. This observational study pooled data from six study groups for more than 29,000 people to determine the associations of consuming dietary cholesterol or eating eggs with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death.
Study suggests personality tests may improve care for prostate cancer patients
Scientists have found that men with high neuroticism -- between a quarter and a fifth of men in developed countries -- are significantly more likely to suffer from adverse events such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence, which may put their recovery from prostate cancer surgery at risk.
Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight -- NASA investigates
Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".