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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 16, 2019


Testosterone slows prostate cancer recurrence in low-risk patients
In the largest such study so far undertaken, US researchers have shown that testosterone replacement slows the recurrence of prostate cancer in low-risk patients.
Taking statins for heart disease cuts risk in half, yet only 6 percent of patients taking as directed
Study finds that taking statins for heart disease cuts risk of second serious event in half, yet only 6 percent of patients are following as directed.
Calcium in arteries is shown to increase patients' imminent risk of a heart attack
New research findings presented at the American College Cardiology Scientific Sessions from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City shows that identifying the presence or absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in a patients' arteries can help determine their future risk.
Patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears may have another surgical option
The arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR) surgical technique offers patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears restored shoulder function and the opportunity to return to sports and physically-demanding work, according to research presented today at the AOSSM/AANA Specialty Day in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Key to successful care of pregnant women in heart failure? Team-based care, study finds
Any time a pregnant woman presents in heart failure there are risks to both mother and baby.
In study, TAVR is superior to surgery for low-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis
A large clinical trial has found that a minimally invasive procedure to replace a narrowed heart valve performed better than surgery in patients who were good candidates for surgery.
DNA of sperm taken from testicles of infertile men 'as good as sperm from fertile men'
Scientists have found that sperm DNA from the testicles of many infertile men is as good as that of ejaculated sperm of fertile men.
Catheter ablation reduces dementia risk in A-Fib, heart disease patients more than medications
Study finds that performing catheter ablations on patients who suffer from both atrial fibrillation and carotid arterial disease reduces their risk of dementia and stroke compared to managing their care with medications.
Blood flow restriction therapy may protect against bone loss following ACL reconstruction
Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients often face bone and muscle loss immediately following the procedure.
Early sports specialization tied to increased injury rates in college athletes
Sixty million kids participate in organized athletics each year with ever increasing amounts of children specializing in one sport before the age of 14 with hopes of a college scholarship or professional career on the line.
Abnormal heart rhythm detected by smartwatch: What does it mean?
Should an abnormal heart rhythm detected by a smartwatch in otherwise healthy young adults be treated?

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