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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 17, 2019


Mental health state associated with higher death rates for prostate and urological cancers
Patients with prostate, bladder or kidney cancers are at greater risk of dying if they have had psychiatric care prior to the cancer treatment.
Scientists identify compounds in coffee which may inhibit prostate cancer
For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer.
Commonly used heart drug associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest
A drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure and angina (chest pain) is associated with an increased risk of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest, according to results from the European Sudden Cardiac Arrest network (ESCAPE-NET) presented today at EHRA 2019.
Hormonal treatment may trigger depression in men with prostate cancer
Men who receive anti-hormonal treatment after having their prostate removed are 80 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men who don't receive this treatment.
Earliest known Mariner's Astrolabe research published today to go in Guinness Book of Records
Guinness World Records have independently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portuguese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in 1502-1503 as the oldest in the world, and have separately certified a ship's bell (dated 1498) recovered from the same wreck site also as the oldest in the world.
Fast-acting agent shows promise in reversing effects of ticagrelor
PB2452 provides immediate and sustained reversal of ticagrelor's antiplatelet effects
Novel electrocardiogram uses signals from ear and hand to check heart rhythm
A novel electrocardiogram (ECG) method which uses signals from the ear and hand to check heart rhythm is revealed today at EHRA 20191 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
New cardiac pump clinically superior, safer for patients
The study of more than 1,000 patients with severe heart failure not only confirms that the HeartMate 3™, a next-generation LVAD device, markedly reduced the need for re-operations due to pump malfunctions, but also found that it lowered risk of bleeding events and strokes, compared to the HeartMate II™.
Study suggests painkillers taken during pregnancy not a cause of asthma in kids
A study of almost 500,000 women indicates that taking paracetamol or other painkillers during pregnancy is not responsible for increasing the risk of asthma in children.
Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia
Australian researchers have used hepatitis B virus genome sequences to deduce that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59,000 years ago.
Absorbable antibiotic envelope can significantly cut cardiac device infections
A Cleveland Clinic-led research team has found that using an absorbable, antibiotic-eluting envelope when implanting cardiac devices like pacemakers and defibrillators can cut the rate of major infections by 40 percent.
Low-risk patients benefit from minimally invasive transcatheter aortic valve replacement
Results from a New England Journal of Medicine paper, released March 17 and co-authored by S.
Depression screening does not impact quality of life after heart attack
After suffering a heart attack or unstable angina (chest pain caused by blocked arteries), patients who were systematically screened for depression and referred for treatment when appropriate did not show a significant improvement in quality of life compared with those who received no depression screening, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments.
World's oldest semen still viable
Ram semen stored at the University of Sydney for 50 years has been used to successfully impregnate 34 ewes, with fertility rates as high as recently stored semen.
Study gives glimpse into how wearable tech may help flag heart rhythm problems
According to preliminary data from the study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session, the Apple Watch was able to detect AFib in a small group of people who had been alerted by the app as having an irregular heartbeat.
TAVR outperforms surgery in younger, low risk patients with AS
Among patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who were at low surgical risk, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using the SAPIEN 3 valve compared with conventional surgery significantly reduced the primary endpoint of death, stroke and re-hospitalizations by 46 percent at one year, according to data from the latest PARTNER trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Prevention of alcohol use in older teens
A recently released publication in the journal Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 'Prevention of Alcohol Use in Older Teens: A Randomized Trial of an Online Family Prevention Program' reveals successful results for an online, family-based prevention program, Smart Choices 4 Teens, which is designed to reduce alcohol use among 16- and 17-year-old teens.
Transcatheter valve replacement safe in those with unusual valve anatomy
Compared with patients who had a typical tricuspid aortic valve, patients with a more unusual bicuspid aortic valve had a similar rate of death but a higher likelihood of stroke after undergoing a procedure to replace the valve by threading surgical equipment through an artery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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