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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 18, 2019


A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products
The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils.
Research into aphasia reveals new interactions between language and thought
Knowledge of the facts is called factive knowledge. In the phrase 'He knows [that it is warm outside]', the embedded clause is assumed to be true.
Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent
DNA barcoding of more than 1,400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1 percent were mislabeled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabeling rate of 30 percent.
Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle.
Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health
A team of scientists at Penn State University set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms.
How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees
Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Tilt training prevents fainting
Tilt training effectively prevents fainting, according to research presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
Semimetals are high conductors
Researchers in China and at UC Davis have measured high conductivity in very thin layers of niobium arsenide, a type of material called a Weyl semimetal.
Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of mortality
The more sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death--particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of US men and women.
Clinical guidelines from specialty societies often biased
Clinical practice guidelines issued by specialty societies in North America often recommend health care services linked to their specialties, in contrast with European guidelines and those from independent organizations, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Sugary drinks may be associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases
There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death.
EPFL researchers make a key discovery on how alpine streams work
An EPFL study has showed that until now, scientists have been substantially underestimating how quickly gases are exchanged between mountain streams and the atmosphere.
Spiraling giants: Eitnessing the birth of a massive binary star system
Scientists have made observations of a molecular cloud that is collapsing to form two massive protostars that will eventually become a binary star system.
CardioMEMS sensor reliably safe, cuts hospitalizations by more than half
In the year following placement of a CardioMEMS heart failure sensor -- designed to wirelessly measure and monitor pulmonary artery pressures that can signal worsening heart failure -- patients experienced a 58 percent reduction in hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice
Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci.
New research explores value-based medicine, integrative health, and whole systems research
Two decades ago, the popular movement for integrative health practices prompted researchers to advance 'whole systems research' (WSR).
Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource.
New record: Over 16 percent efficiency for single-junction organic solar cells
Two non-fullerene acceptors, namely BTPT-4F and BTPTT-4F, were selected to match with a wide-bandgap polymer donor P2F-EHp consisting of an imide-functionalized benzotriazole moiety, as these materials presented complementary absorption and well-matched energy levels.
Ultrasound provides precise, minimally invasive way to measure heart function in children
Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist.
Experimental blood test accurately spots fibromyalgia
For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples -- work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis.
Low-risk patients may benefit from less invasive transcatheter valve replacement
A new study by a team of cardiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) led by senior and corresponding author Jeffrey Popma, MD, suggests that a minimally invasive procedure currently reserved for patients too frail to undergo surgery may in fact be a safe and effective alternative for healthier patients.
Icosapent ethyl drug reduces risk of recurrent cardiovascular events
Further insights from the REDUCE-IT trial show that high-dose, pure and stable EPA omega 3 drug not only reduces the burden of first cardiovascular events but also subsequent and total heart attacks, strokes, and other measures.
Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis
To identify genes involved in photosynthesis, researchers built a library containing thousands of single-celled algae, each with a different gene mutation.
Common treatment for multiple sclerosis may prolong life
Researchers from the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute have found that a widely prescribed drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with longer survival for patients.
Statin add-on may offer new/another option for reducing LDL-C in high-risk patients
Patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke who took an investigational drug in addition to a statin had significantly lower LDL, or 'bad' cholesterol, after 12 weeks compared to similar patients who took a placebo in addition to statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds
Employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work, according to a new study.
Prophylactic cranial irradiation: Improvements for advanced NSCLC
Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), a technique used to prevent the clinical development of brain metastases, is established as a standard approach for many patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) after initial therapy.
Researchers find eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease
In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries.
Binge-watching political dramas with female characters could get you hooked on politics
Don't feel so bad for binge-watching a political drama -- it might lead to more civic participation, as long as the show features a female lead character.
Case study: Bartonella and sudden-onset adolescent schizophrenia
In a new case study, researchers describe an adolescent human patient diagnosed with rapid onset schizophrenia who was found instead to have a Bartonella henselae infection.
Diabetes drug effective against heart failure in wide spectrum of patients
The cardiovascular benefits of the diabetes drug dapagliflozin extend across a wide spectrum of patients and are especially pronounced in those with reduced ejection fraction, a measure of the heart's pumping ability indicative of poor heart functioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed
One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs -- bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks.
Researchers predict 1.4 million deaths from all cancers in 2019 in the EU
Death rates from breast cancer are predicted to fall in all European Union (EU) countries in 2019 with the exception of Poland, according to new research published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology.
Fast-acting psychedelic associated with improvements in depression/anxiety
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that use of the synthetic psychedelic 5-methocy-N,-N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) appears to be associated with unintended improvements in self-reported depression and anxiety when given in a ceremonial group setting.
Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats.
Refugee women have healthier pregnancies than US women -- why? An unhealthy US culture
African refugee women experience healthier pregnancies than women born in the United States, despite receiving less prenatal care, found a recent University at Buffalo study.
Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework
For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison.
Apixaban plus P2Y12 inhibitor and no aspirin safest for patients with both AFib and ACS
Patients at high risk for heart attacks, strokes and blood clots who were treated with a novel blood thinner (apixaban) and an antiplatelet drug such as clopidogrel had a significantly lower risk of bleeding and being hospitalized compared with patients who received an older blood-thinning medication such as warfarin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Advances point the way to smaller, safer batteries
New Cornell research advances the design of solid-state batteries, a technology that is inherently safer and more energy-dense than today's lithium-ion batteries, which rely on flammable liquid electrolytes for fast transfer of chemical energy stored in molecular bonds to electricity.
Inflammation links heart disease and depression, study finds
People with heart disease are more likely to suffer from depression, and the opposite is also true.
Surgery using ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure
A one-off operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to maintain reduced blood pressure in hypertension patients for at least six months, according to the results of a clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).
Grow a better jawbone in your ribs
Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston develop a technique to grow custom-fit bone implants to repair jawbone injuries from a patient's own rib.
Green tech startups see boost in patents and investment when partnering with government
Collaboration between government and startups could help meet the climate challenge while growing small businesses.
New tool better at predicting death after cardiac admission than current indexes
A new tool designed for patients with heart disease is better at predicting death after hospital admission than current tools, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Repairing leaky valve improves heart failure patients' quality of life
Patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve reported feeling better and experiencing fewer heart failure symptoms if they underwent a procedure to repair their valve than patients who received standard treatment alone, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
New research identifies potential PTSD treatment improvement
Researchers may have found a way to improve a common treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by changing how the brain learns to respond less severely to fearful conditions, according to research published in Journal of Neuroscience.
Virtual reality could improve your balance, study finds
Virtual Reality technology could become an efficient tool for older people with balance problems or for rehabilitation following injuries or illness that affect balance and movement.
Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease
A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests, carried out by the University of Kent, has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo parakeet in Mauritius.
Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change
A team of four scientists from the US and the UK explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change, in a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change.
Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin
Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research.
Pure Omega-3 prescription drug markedly reduces first, repeat and total CV events
Taking a high dose of icosapent ethyl -- a pure and stable prescription form of the omega-3 fatty acid known as EPA -- significantly reduces the occurrence of first, subsequent and total ischemic events, including heart attacks, strokes and related deaths, among people at high cardiovascular risk despite already being on statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill
Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco.
New potential approach to treat atopic dermatitis
How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin?
Stopping DAPT after one-month improved outcomes in stent patients
Patients who stopped taking aspirin one month after receiving a stent in the heart's arteries but continued taking the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel fared significantly better after one year compared with those who followed the standard practice of continuing both medications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Machine learning scientists to collaborate on AI-powered drug discovery
The laboratories of Jianfeng Pei at Peking University and Alex Zhavoronkov at Insilico Medicine partner with Frontiers in Pharmacology, a leading open science platform on the research topic ''AI for drug discovery and development''
Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining
Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future.
Echocardiograms may help with patient selection for transcatheter mitral valve repair
Clinicians should use echocardiography, an ultrasound that shows the heart's structure and function, when determining whether patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve are likely to benefit from valve repair, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Novel heart pump shows superior outcomes in advanced heart failure
Severely ill patients with advanced heart failure who received a novel heart pump -- the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) -- suffered significantly fewer strokes, pump-related blood clots and bleeding episodes after two years, compared with similar patients who received an older, more established pump, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Breastfeeding can erase effects of prenatal violence for newborns
Notre Dame researchers found that breastfeeding through the first six weeks of life acts as a protective factor, effectively negating the risk of IPV the mother experienced during pregnancy on early infant difficult temperament.
NASA-NOAA Satellite catches last burst of energy in Tropical Depression 03W
Tropical Depression 03W has dissipated in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, but not without one last show of strength on infrared satellite imagery.
Angiography timing does not impact survival after cardiac arrest for NSTEMI patients
In patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest who do not show evidence of the type of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), receiving immediate coronary angiography did not improve survival at 90 days compared to waiting a few days before undergoing the procedure, based on findings presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
CDC researchers report on trends in hospital breastfeeding policies
A new study from the CDC showed modest improvement in optimal hospital breastfeeding policy from 2009 to 2015, with more than 2 times as many hospitals having a model breastfeeding policy and increases in early initiation of breastfeeding and limitation of non-breast milk feeds of breastfed infants.
Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research
Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines.
Scientists hunt down the brain circuit responsible for alcohol cravings
Scientists at Scripps Research have found that they can reverse the desire to drink in alcohol-dependent rats -- with the flip of a switch.
NASA finds heavy rainfall potential in new Tropical Cyclone Trevor
Tropical Cyclone Trevor formed in the Coral Sea of the Southwestern Pacific Ocean on March 18.
ACC/AHA guidance for preventing heart disease, stroke released
The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health.
New practice corrects pump function in heart failure
Late-breaking results from the ElectroCRT trial presented today at EHRA 2019 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress, pave the way for a new standard of care to improve the heart's pump function in selected patients with heart failure.
How heavy elements come about in the universe
Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons).
TAVR as good as surgery for patients at low surgical risk
A new trial comparing self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to standard open-heart surgery for valve replacement -- this time in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered low surgical risk -- found no difference in the combined rate of disabling stroke or death from any cause at two years.
Antibiotic envelope markedly cuts risk of cardiac device-related infection
Encasing cardiac devices such as pacemakers or defibrillators in an 'envelope' --a mesh sleeve embedded with antibiotics -- reduces the risk of major device-related infection by 40 percent within one year with no increase in complications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species
Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by McGill University researchers.
Radial, femoral access for PCI found equal in terms of survival
Doctors can use either an artery in the arm (the radial approach) or in the groin (the femoral approach) to safely perform percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on patients presenting with a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Materials could delay frost up to 300 times longer than existing anti-icing coatings
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering describe for the first time several unique properties of materials known as phase-switching liquids, or PSLs, that hold promise as next-generation anti-icing materials.
'Inflamm-aging' causes loss of bone healing ability in the elderly
Increases in chronic inflammation -- not the passage of time -- is the main reason why injured bones do not heal as well with age.
Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer's disease
Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study.
Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West
New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West - affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.
Evidence for ancient magnetic sense in humans
The human brain can unconsciously respond to changes in Earth's magnetic fields, according to a team of geoscientists and neurobiologists.
Have sleep apnea? Using your CPAP device consistently may slow memory loss
A growing number of studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), or 'sleep-disordered breathing,' is associated with a higher risk for memory problems and for problems with thinking and making decisions.
Holocaust survivors with PTSD transmit negative views on aging to their adult offspring
A new study provides first evidence that negative views on aging are transmitted in families of Holocaust survivors suffering from PTSD.
Study: Research ties common heartburn medications to kidney disease and failure
Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study.
Does 'pay-to-play' put sports, extracurricular activities out of reach for some students?
Students from lower income households experience twice the rate of non-participation in sports and extracurricular activities than peers.
Stopping aspirin three months after stenting does not increase risk of death
Patients who stopped taking aspirin three months after receiving a stent to open the heart's arteries but continued taking a P2Y12 inhibitor -- clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor -- did not experience higher rates of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke after a year compared with those receiving standard therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Brain research reveals a circuit for cocaine relapse
Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified which neurons are responsible for cocaine-seeking behaviors in rodents and where these neurons exert their effects within the brain.
Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship
As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, Michigan State University researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner.
Remote monitoring keeps heart failure patients out of hospital
Remote monitoring keeps heart failure patients out of hospital, according to late-breaking findings from the RESULT trial presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
'Back to basics' atrial fibrillation procedure could slash waiting lists
A day case catheter ablation procedure which includes only the bare essentials and delivers the same outcomes could slash waiting lists for atrial fibrillation patients, according to late-breaking results from the AVATAR-AF trial presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.
New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities
Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study.
Supercrystal: A hidden phase of matter created by a burst of light
'Frustration' plus a pulse of laser light resulted in a stable 'supercrystal' created by a team of researchers led by Penn State and Argonne National Laboratory, together with University of California, Berkeley, and two other national laboratories.
When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters
New research conducted by Michigan State University and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing -- the fall migration.
Most teens report using marijuana less often after legalization
Only one group of teenagers used marijuana more often after retail sales were legalized in Washington than they did before -- high school seniors who work 11 or more hours per week, according to new research led by a WSU College of Nursing professor.
Long-distance quantum information exchange -- success at the nanoscale
At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots.
Pharmacists have wider clinical role in casualty, concludes study
The first evaluation of pharmacists based in accident and emergency departments has concluded that with additional clinical skills, they are able to take on overall clinical responsibility for patients.
Step-up or break out: How firms in unstable countries can secure overseas business
Offshoring services providers (OSPs) operating in unstable countries can secure overseas projects and deliver on their promises if they understand the issues overseas clients may have when doing business with OSPs and work to address these a priority within the business relationship.
Ticagrelor is as safe and effective as clopidogrel after heart attack
Patients given clot busters to treat a heart attack fared equally well if they were given the standard blood thinning medication clopidogrel versus the newer, more potent drug ticagrelor, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Can people learn to embrace risk?
Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women.
Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective
As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform.
Researchers discover new material to help power electronics
A research team at The Ohio State University has discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons -- using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary.
Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing
UMD biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs.
The robots that dementia caregivers want: robots for joy, robots for sorrow
A team of scientists spent six months co-designing robots with informal caregivers for people with dementia, such as family members.
Protective antibodies also found in premature babies
Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine.
Fertility app 'Dot' found to be as effective as other family planning methods
Results of a first-of-its-kind prospective study with a family planning app find it to be as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy, according to Georgetown researchers.
Lowering blood pressure prevents worsening brain damage in elderly
Elderly people with high blood pressure, or hypertension, who took medicine to keep their 24-hour systolic blood pressure around 130 mm Hg for three years showed significantly less accumulation of harmful brain lesions compared with those taking medicine to maintain a systolic blood pressure around 145 mm Hg, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
UW team finds key to common cancer pathway
A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison cancer researchers Richard A.
On-chip, electronically tunable frequency comb
Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Stanford University have developed an integrated, on-chip frequency comb that is efficient, stable and highly controllable with microwaves.
Partial oral antibiotic therapy safe and effective in infectious endocarditis
Patients with an infection of the inner lining on the left side of the heart (endocarditis) who were switched from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy had better long-term survival and fewer complications than similar patients who remained on conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Where are teens getting their electronic cigarettes?
A UC researcher performed a secondary analysis of the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey, finding that of 1,579 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who had admitted to using electronic cigarettes within the last 30 days of the survey, 13.6 percent were daily users.
Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System
Ohio University researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of continental Africa, and providing tantalizing insights into the past diversity of mammals on the planet.
Blood pressure control reduces dementia risk in mid-life patients with atrial fibrillation
Dementia risk in mid-life patients with atrial fibrillation can be reduced by controlling high blood pressure, according to a study presented today at EHRA 2019, a congress of the European Society of Cardiology.
NUS researchers create water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities
Inspired by jellyfish, NUS researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions.
Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers
Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.
The story of GARP: a potential target for cancer immunotherapy
In an article published in the March issue of Cancer Research, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina reveal how the cell surface receptor GARP plays a role in T regulatory cell function and migration to the gut.
NASA sees Savannah lose its tropical eye
Tropical Cyclone Savannah weakened and ''lost'' its eye as high clouds filtered over it.
Two-drug combos using popular calcium channel blocker show superiority in lowering BP
In the largest randomized controlled trial of treatment for high blood pressure ever conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, two frontline two-drug combinations that included the long-acting calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, were able to drive down blood pressure levels more than a third two-drug combination that did not include amlodipine, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
Team studies smarter automatic defibrillator
Automatic implantable cardiac defibrillators (AICDs) deliver shocks to the heart to correct arrythmias.
Alligator study supports convergent evolution of spatial hearing
Alligators encode a sound's location in space like birds but differently than mammals, according to a comparative animal study published in JNeurosci.
People who don't drink may still suffer harms from alcohol, study suggests
Harms to people resulting from alcohol consumption by others in Germany in 2014 are assessed in a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.
Eating fish may help prevent asthma
A scientist from James Cook University in Australia says an innovative study has revealed new evidence that eating fish can help prevent asthma.
Researchers develop sensor to detect brain disorders in seconds
Using nanotechnology, UCF researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers.
Australian study links breastfeeding with lower risk of heart disease
Mothers who breastfeed their babies have a lower risk of developing or dying from heart disease than those who don't breastfeed, finds new research from the University of Sydney, Australia.
Registry helps move aortic dissection care forward
Diagnosis, treatments and outcomes for acute aortic dissection have evolved.

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