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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 22, 2019


Novel MD simulation sheds light on mystery of hydrated electron's structure
Scientists have known about the existence of the hydrated electron -- extra electrons solvated in liquid water -- for more than fifty years.
Researchers find method to prioritize treatment strategies in hepatitis C in US prisons
There are currently more than three million people in the US with hepatitis C, a condition that can lead to serious and even deadly liver complications.
Tall ice-cliffs may trigger big calving events -- and fast sea-level rise
Glaciers that drain ice sheets such as Antarctica or Greenland often flow into the ocean, ending in near-vertical cliffs.
Mayo Clinic researchers identify potential new therapy for liver diseases
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers.
Citizen science programs provide valuable data on intermittent rivers in southwestern US
An OU-led project is showing how citizen science programs provide valuable data on rivers in southwestern United States.
A social bacterium with versatile habits
Related individuals of a soil bacterial species live in cooperative groups and exhibit astonishing genetic and behavioral diversity.
A protein's surprising role offers clues to limit graft-vs.-host disease
In a surprising finding, researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center showed the protein NLRP6 aggravated the difficult symptoms of gastrointestinal graft-vs.-host disease.
Researchers get humans to think like computers
Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can be tricked into mistaking random scribbles for trains, fences and even school buses.
New research shows highest energy density all-solid-state batteries now possible
Scientists from Tohoku University and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization have developed a new complex hydride lithium superionic conductor that could result in all-solid-state batteries with the highest energy density to date.
Scientists argue for more comprehensive studies of Cascade volcanoes
In a perspective essay published this week in Nature Communications, scientists argue for more 'synthesis' research looking at the big picture of volcanology to complement myriad research efforts looking at single volcanoes.
New model found effective in predicting risk of opioid overdose
A new study sought to develop and validate a way to predict the risk of opioid overdose among Medicare beneficiaries with at least one opioid prescription.
Squishing blood stem cells could facilitate harvest for transplants
How deformable cells are, and thus how stiff or squishy they are, plays an important role in retaining blood-forming stem cells in their marrow niches and thus preserving their long-term repopulation capabilities.
A first glimpse deep beneath an ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge
For the first time ever, researchers have been able to peek deep into the mantle of the Earth under an ultraslow mid-ocean ridge, where they have been able to observe mantle melting and growth of the Earth's crust.
Scaling forward
An Argonne scientist has new ways of accelerating the development of new organic materials for electronics.
Generic weight-loss drug may be safe and effective for long-term treatment
An inexpensive weight-loss drug approved 60 years ago for only short-term use also may be safe and effective for longer-term treatment, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Health and the Patient Outcomes Research to Advance Learning (PORTAL) network.
PLOS Special Collection launch: Shaping novel TB treatments
To commemorate World TB Day, a Special Collection has been released by PLOS Medicine containing a series of articles that articulate the essential new steps in clinical research that will pave the way for the development of tomorrow's optimal treatment for all forms of tuberculosis.
Radioactive material detected remotely using laser-induced electron avalanche breakdown
University of Maryland physicists have developed a powerful new method to detect radioactive material.
Obese mouse mothers trigger heart problems in offspring
Mitochondria manufacture energy in every cell of the body, including heart muscle cells.
Chemicals induce dipoles to damp plasmons
A Rice University-led study discovers a mechanism by which molecules affect the plasmonic response of gold nanorods.
4D-printed materials can be stiff as wood or soft as sponge
Imagine smart materials that can morph from being stiff as wood to as soft as a sponge - and also change shape.
Teens who seek solitude may know what's best for them, research suggests
Teens who choose to spend time alone may know what's best for them, according to new research that suggests solitude isn't a red flag for isolation or depression.
New computational tool could change how we study pathogens
A sophisticated new analysis too incorporating advanced mathematical strategies could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dangerous, fast-evolving disease vectors.
Colonization in slow motion
There is a wide variety of animals living on the Arctic seabed.
Study reveals impact of plain cigarette packaging warnings
Health warnings on plain-packaged cigarettes have more of an impact on smokers than those on branded packs, according to new research from the University of Stirling.
Financial incentives didn't improve response rates to mailed colorectal cancer screening tests
Financial incentives didn't increase completion rates of colorectal cancer screening tests mailed to patients.
Anti-TB drugs can increase risk of TB re-infection
Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb).
X-rays reveal termites' self-cooling, self-ventilating, self-draining skyscrapers
New insight into termites' architectural strategies could help us design more energy efficient self-sustaining buildings for humans.
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Veronica eyes Australia's Pilbara Coast
Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move toward Australia's Pilbara Coast in Western Australia.
UTSW researchers identify new mechanism to reduce inflammation
UT Southwestern researchers have identified two proteins that act as gatekeepers to dampen a potentially life-threatening immune response to chronic infection.
When neurons are out of shape, antidepressants may not work
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD.
Climate changes make some aspects of weather forecasting increasingly difficult
The ongoing climate changes make it increasingly difficult to predict certain aspects of weather, according to a new study from Stockholm University.
Jupiter's unknown journey revealed
The giant planet Jupiter was formed four times further from the sun than its current orbit, and migrated inwards in the solar system over a period of 700 000 years.
The success of an environmental charge
In October 2015, England introduced a charge for single-use plastic bags in supermarkets.
Salamanders chew with their palate
'According to the textbooks, amphibians swallow their prey whole, but we have been able to refute this,' says Dr.
UN University debuts online tool to help nations meet 2030 goal: Clean water, sanitation for all
The self-reported struggle of many countries to design effective plans to achieve the UN's Sustainable Development Goals has inspired a new UN tool to guide such nations along a 6-step path towards the critical SDG 6: clean water and sanitation for all.
Colourful male fish have genes to thank for their enduring looks
Striking colours that are seen only in the males of some species are partly explained by gene behaviour, research into guppy fish suggests.
Mailing colorectal cancer screening kit found effective, regardless of financial incentive
Roughly a quarter of patients overdue for colorectal cancer screening mailed completed kits back within two months, even if they weren't given any kind of financial incentive.
Optical 'tweezers' combine with X-rays to enable analysis of crystals in liquids
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new technique that combines the power of microscale 'tractor beams' with high-powered X-rays, enabling them to see and manipulate crystals freely floating in solution.
Ankle exoskeleton fits under clothes for potential broad adoption
The device does not require additional components such as batteries or actuators carried on the back or waist.
Energy monitor can find electrical failures before they happen
A new system devised by researchers at MIT can monitor the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory, determining which ones are in use at any given time and whether any are showing signs of an imminent failure.
Time maps: How our brain perceives time
What happens in our brain when we listen to the rhythmic pace of a song or when, at the traffic light, the light is red and we are trembling awaiting the green?
Tropical Cyclone Trevor fills Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria in NASA image
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Trevor filling up Australia's Gulf of Carpentaria.
Study shows how electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide
A Washington University team showed how a phototrophic microbe called Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust to reduce carbon dioxide.
How does estrogen protect bones? Unraveling a pathway to menopausal bone loss
Women who have reached menopause are at a greater risk of developing osteoporosis, which can lead to bone fractures and long-term impairment of mobility.
UAlberta paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex
University of Alberta paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada.
Caterpillars retrieve 'voicemail' by eating soil
Leaf-feeding caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil.
PSU study: Low-income neighborhoods more vulnerable to flooding, extreme heat
The methods can be replicated by cities to help them identify which neighborhoods are most at risk and what demographic factors characterize the most vulnerable citizens.
How the 'good feeling' can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate
More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively.
JAMA viewpoint: Physicians' trust in one another is a care safety and quality issue
While the importance of trusted relationships between patients and their physicians is taken for granted, little attention has been given to the relationships among physicians themselves.
Sleep problems, Alzheimer's disease are linked, but which comes first?
A new article explores the pathophysiological factors that link sleep disturbances and Alzheimer's disease.
Hears the pitch: Ryerson-led research team invents a new mode of photoacoustic imaging
Ryerson University Physicist Dr. Michael Kolios, his former graduate student Dr.
Like mountaineers, nerves need expert guidance to find their way
Similar to the dozens of Sherpas that guide hikers up treacherous Himalayan mountains to reach a summit, the nervous system relies on elaborate timing and location of guidance cues for neuronal axons--threadlike projections--to successfully reach their destinations in the body.
Climate change affecting fish in Ontario lakes, University of Guelph study reveals
Researchers have found warmer average water temperatures in Ontario lakes over the past decade have forced fish to forage in deeper water.
Understanding how people respond to symptoms of a brain tumor
A recent study from King's College London and Cambridge University highlighted that people may experience multiple subtle changes before being diagnosed with a brain tumor.

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Now Playing: Science for the People

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