Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 24, 2019
Exercise adds up to big brain boosts
In new work being presented this week about the effects of exercise on the brain at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) in San Francisco, researchers are finding that brain changes that occur after a single workout are predictive of what happens with sustained physical training over time.

Females respond poorly to ketogenic weight loss diet in an animal model
The ketogenic diet recently has been touted for weight loss and improving blood sugar control, but a new study finds that females fail to show these metabolic benefits on this high-fat, very low-carbohydrate diet.

Smart speaker technology harnessed for hospital medical treatments
Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.

New IR treatment for 'tennis elbow' reduces pain and inflammation without surgery
Tennis elbow, the painful chronic condition that affects up to 3 percent of the US adult population, can be effectively treated through transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), an image-guided, non-surgical treatment that decreases abnormal blood flow to the injured area to reduce inflammation and pain, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.

Exposure to HIV virus, treatment before birth linked to obesity later in life
Teens and young adults who were exposed to HIV and antiretroviral therapy before birth but are HIV-negative themselves are at increased risk of obesity and asthma-like symptoms, according to research to be presented Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Adipose hormone may play role in obesity-related asthma
New research suggests a hormone released from fat tissue is critical in the development of obesity-related asthma and may be a target of future treatments for the disease.

Particulate air pollution linked with reduced sperm production in mice
Exposure to tiny air pollution particles may lead to reduced sperm production, suggests new research in mice to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Cost savings from growth hormone insurance strategies not passed on to patients
Increasingly aggressive insurance strategies have lowered the total costs and insurance costs of growth hormone drugs, but those savings are not being passed on to patients, according to new research to be presented Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Investigational obesity drug, oxytocin, weakens brain's reward signals for food
The hormone oxytocin reduces the communication between different brain areas involved in the cognitive, sensory and emotional processing of food cues that people with obesity demonstrate when they look at high-calorie foods, according to research being presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Obesity speeds up the start of puberty in boys, study finds
Girls are not the only ones who go through puberty early if they have obesity.

Screen time plus snacking a risk for metabolic disorder in teens
Teens who sit for hours watching TV, using the computer or playing video games while eating unhealthy snacks are at increased risk for a group of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to research to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La.

BPA exposure during pregnancy can alter circadian rhythms
Exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated 'safe' human exposure level, can lead to changes in circadian rhythms, according to a mice study to be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Autoimmune diseases are related to each other, some more than others
Researchers using the world's largest twin registry to study seven autoimmune diseases found the risk of developing the seven diseases is largely inherited, but that some diseases are more closely related than others.

Patients bear increased financial burden for growth hormone treatment despite FDA approval
Despite an FDA approval of growth hormone treatment for children with idiopathic short stature (ISS), the mean cost burden to patients and their families has increased over time.

Genetic rickets improves more with burosumab than standard care, study finds
Burosumab, a new injectable medicine to treat X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), an inherited form of rickets, demonstrates superior improvements in rickets and other outcomes compared with conventional therapy in an international, phase 3 clinical trial in children.

Youth smoking and vaping: What does it mean for tobacco control
New research from PIRE/PRC features analysis of in-depth, qualitative interviews with young vapers in California between 15 and 25.

Ethnic minorities not 'hypersensitive' to microaggressions, research shows
There is no evidence that ethnic minorities are more sensitive than other groups to supposedly trivial insults or invalidations, they just experience them more often, research from Goldsmiths, University of London shows.

Study highlights detrimental effect of overlooking female athletes' nutritional needs
As poor nutrition can negatively affect everything from bone to reproductive health, more attention needs to be paid to the specific nutritional needs of female athletes, a collaborative study from New Zealand's University of Otago and University of Waikato argues.

Chemicals in household dust may promote fat cell development
Endocrine-disrupting chemicals present in household dust promote the development of fat cells in a cell model and could contribute to increased growth in children relative to their age, according to research to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light
A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study.

Scientists turn back evolutionary clock to develop high-CO2-tolerant microalgae
A team of scientists led by Prof. XU Jian from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof.
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