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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 25, 2019


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Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant
MD Anderson study may explain why immunotherapy not effective for some patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer
White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
Experimental drug reverses high cholesterol, obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in animal study
Scientists have discovered a novel molecular pathway for an enzyme inhibitor in humans that plays a direct role in the development of high cholesterol and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which they then were able to reverse in mice with an investigational drug.
Mount Sinai researchers identify over 400 genes associated with schizophrenia development
In the largest study of its kind, involving more than 100,000 people, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have applied a novel machine learning method to identify 413 genetic associations with schizophrenia across 13 brain regions.
Income inequalities in Indigenous groups linked to mental health issues
Indigenous peoples in Canada have high rates of psychological distress, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, and these mental health issues are linked to income inequalities, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally
Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists.
Advanced imaging technology predicts cardiovascular risk from inflammation detected in arteries
The PESA-CNIC-Santander study analyzes the role of arterial inflammation in this process, providing information that will allow early diagnosis and the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments.
Understanding gene interactions holds key to personalized medicine, scientists say
Scientists outline a new framework for studying gene function -- not in isolation, gene by gene, but as a network, to understand how multiple genes and genetic background influence trait inheritance.
Matter waves and quantum splinters
Physicists in the United States, Austria and Brazil have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.
Innovative model improves access to life-saving stroke care
Training interventional radiologists to perform endovascular thrombectomies results in positive outcomes for patients experiencing stroke, according to a study presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting.
LSU Health study reports continued PTSD in women exposed to deepwater horizon oil spill
A study led by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health reports that women exposed to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (BP) Oil Spill continue to experience symptoms of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Crisis management: When your celebrity advertising endorser generates negative publicity
Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Free University of Berlin published new research in the INFORMS journal Management Science that provides companies with substantiated, actionable insights on strategies for effectively responding to situations where their highly compensated celebrity endorsers generate negative publicity.
UBC researchers develop new heart valve aimed at high-risk patients
Researchers at UBC have created the first-ever nanocomposite biomaterial heart-valve developed to reduce or eliminate complications related to heart transplants.
Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function
A machine-learning model from MIT researchers computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.
How watching TV and movies helps people with attachment issues
People who have trouble with romantic relationships may watch movies and TV shows for more than just a chance to escape from their lives for a bit.
Scientists home in on microRNA processing for novel cancer therapies
More than a decade of research on the mda-7/IL-24 gene has shown that it helps to suppress a majority of cancer types, and now scientists are focusing on how the gene drives this process by influencing microRNAs.
Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size
Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria.
Sex-based bias: Women in Japan are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation in public places from bystanders
Japanese women under 65 are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders when they suffer a sudden cardiac arrest in a public location compared to in a residential location, report investigators in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier.
Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis
The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society.
Study suggests how, when to support military couples after homecoming
Military couples look forward to joyful reunions after long deployments, but difficulties may lie ahead.
Engineering cellular function without living cells
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells.
Replacing sitting time with physical activity associated with lower risk of death
For those who get the least amount of physical activity, replacing a half hour of sitting time with physical activity was associated with up to a nearly 50 percent reduction in mortality, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society
Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures
Researchers at Washington State University, University of New Mexico, Eindhoven University of Technology, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature -- an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.
ANU scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils
Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts.
Study: Privacy concerns keep men from HIV testing, treatment
Privacy concerns linked to both health facilities and providers are major barriers to increasing the number of men who are tested and treated for HIV in Cote d'Ivoire, suggests new Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) research.
Stalagmite holds key to predicting droughts, floods for India, Vanderbilt team finds
By studying the last 50 years of growth of a stalagmite from Mawmluh Cave, they found an unexpected connection between winter rainfall amounts in northeast India and climatic conditions in the Pacific Ocean.
Sex hormone levels in older men are linked to lower biological age
Older men tend to have lower biological age if they have higher levels of sex hormones, particularly the estradiol form of estrogen, a large new study from Australia finds.
Women are 30 percent less likely to be considered for a hiring process than men
Women are on average 30% less likely to be called for a job interview than men with the same characteristics.
How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests
Relationships between tree diversity and pest diversity follow a hump-shaped curve.
Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing
A new method allows the quantum state of atomic 'qubits'--the basic unit of information in quantum computers -- to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms.
The stroke care paradox: Close-knit social networks increase delays in hospital arrival
Patients with closer-knit social networks, including family members and spouses, were more likely to delay seeking hospital care for a stroke whereas those with a more dispersed network of acquaintances were more likely to seek care faster.
Brain stem cells age faster in MS patients
Brain stem cells in people with the most severe form of multiple sclerosis look much older than they really are, according to a study led by UConn Health and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Discrimination, PTSD may lead to high preterm-birth rates among African-American women
African-American women are nearly twice as likely to give birth prematurely as white women.
CRISPR-chip enables digital detection of DNA without amplification
Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Assistant Professor and University of California, Berkeley Visiting Scientist Kiana Aran led the multi-university research team responsible for the work described in the paper 'CRISPR-Chip: A CRISPR-based Graphene-enhanced Field Effect Biosensor for Electronic Detection of Unamplified Target Genes,' to be published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering on March 25.
A key player in the maturation of sexual organs
Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function.
Satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Veronica along Australia coast
On March 25, 2019 Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move in southerly direction along the coast of Western Australia in the Southern Indian Ocean.
UMD-Led researchers' wood-based technology creates electricity from heat
A University of Maryland-led research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.
Does wearable behavioral intervention improve social behavior in kids with autism spectrum disorder?
This randomized clinical trial of 71 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tested a wearable behavioral intervention deployed on Google Glass and worn by children at home to reinforce facial engagement and emotion recognition to improve social behavior.
Peer relations linked to smoking behavior in vocational students
In a Nursing Open study, peer relations and self-rated health were associated with smoking behavior in both girls and boys studying in upper secondary vocational schools.
Study explores why 'progressive teetotalers' may emerge from college engineering programs
First-year engineering students who gravitate toward progressive ideas, including about gender equity in the workplace, tend to drink less alcohol, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher.
Minimally invasive uterine fibroid treatment safer and as effective as surgical treatment
Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) effectively treats uterine fibroids with fewer post-procedure complications compared to myomectomy, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.
Peptide shows promise for protecting kidneys from nephritis
A synthetic peptide appears to directly disrupt the destructive inflammation that occurs in nephritis, enabling the kidneys to better recover and maintain their important functions, investigators report.
Icy giant planets in the laboratory
Giant planets like Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed.
Second potential male birth control pill passes human safety tests
A new male birth control pill passed tests of safety and tolerability when healthy men used it daily for a month, and it produced hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, according to researchers at two institutions testing the drug.
Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues
People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds.
Experts reveal that clouds have moderated warming triggered by climate change
Led by Swansea University's Tree Ring Research Group, researchers from Sweden, Finland and Norway have analysed information contained in the rings of ancient pine trees from northern Scandinavia to reveal how clouds have reduced the impact of natural phases of warmth in the past and are doing so again now to moderate the warming caused by anthropogenic climate change.
Restoring this enzyme's function protects against heart disease in lupus and beyond
Patients with lupus are at increased risk of heart disease.
Despite general support for police use of body-worn cameras, impacts may be overestimated
Police use of body-worn cameras is growing rapidly in the United States.
GPs key in ensuring the new Faster Diagnosis Standard for Cancer is a success
GPs will have a pivotal role in ensuring the success of the new Faster Diagnosis Standard (FDS) for Cancer, new research from the University of Surrey finds.
House hunting for hellbenders
For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision.
BU researchers discover therapeutic target of melanoma
Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma.
New type of mobile tracking link shoppers' physical movements, buying choices
A new study used a targeting strategy that tracks where, when, and for how long consumers are in a shopping mall to determine how shoppers' physical movements affect their economic choices.
Researchers unveil effects of dust particles on cloud properties
An international team led by Japanese scientists has generated significant findings that highlight the impact of high-latitude dusts on the conversion of clouds' water droplets to ice -- or glaciation -- within low-level clouds in the Arctic region.
New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate
Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier -- a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage.
New insights into genetics of fly longevity
Alexey Moskalev, Ph.D., Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology Institute of Biology, and co-authors from the Institute of biology of Komi Science Center of RAS, Engelgard's Institute of molecular biology, involved in the study of the aging mechanisms and longevity of model animals announce the publication of a scientific article titled: 'The Neuronal Overexpression of Gclc in Drosophila melanogaster Induces Life Extension With Longevity-Associated Transcriptomic Changes in the Thorax' in Frontiers in Genetics - a leading open science platform.
Wagers winter plants make to survive
In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources.
Type 2 diabetes screening in community pharmacies could increase early diagnosis
New research shows that community pharmacies are well placed to screen patients for type 2 diabetes.
Study examines commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions
Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study at the University of Illinois explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the tradeoffs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.
A fascinating phase transition: From one liquid state to another
Scientists at the University of Tokyo described a rare 'liquid-to-liquid' phase transition in pure triphenyl phosphite.
How tree diversity affects invasive forest pests
A broad-scale study of US forest data suggests a significant -- but not simple -- relationship between the number of native tree species and the number of nonnative forest pests.
Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migrations
Whale barnacles add new shell throughout the year that has been shown to reflect, through oxygen isotope ratios, the conditions of the seas through which the whale traveled.
Debt relief improves psychological and cognitive function, enabling better decision-making
A new study by the Social Service Research Centre at the National University of Singapore demonstrates that reducing the number of debt accounts lowers the mental burden of the poor, thereby improving psychological and cognitive performance.
The Forces behind South and Central China's Extremely Hot Summer
The effects of extreme warming have been felt across the globe in recent years.
Measurement of thoughts during knowledge acquisition
How does the brain represent our knowledge of the world?
OU study finds climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity
A University of Oklahoma study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies.
Patient online consultation requests 'mirror' busiest surgery times
Patients are using online consultations in the same way they would arrange a consultation via traditional means, a new independent evaluation by the University of Warwick reveals.
White women with PCOS more likely to have anxiety than black women with condition
White women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have significantly higher anxiety symptoms compared to black women with the condition, a new study suggests.
Craft breweries increase residential property values
Researchers focused on properties sold between 2002 and 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina, within a half mile of a brewery.
New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to reveal dark matter of the transcriptome
A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA.
Study examines racial segregation, inequality of care in NICUs
This observational study looked at the extent of racial segregation and inequality of care for very low-birth-weight and very preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the United States.
Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers
Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.
Are preventive drugs overused at the end of life in older adults with cancer?
A new study reveals that preventive medications -- such as those to lower blood pressure or cholesterol, or to protect bone health, among others -- are commonly prescribed during the last year of life of older adults with cancer, even though they are unlikely to provide meaningful benefits.
'Technoference': We're more tired & less productive because of our phones
An Australian survey of 709 mobile phone users (aged 18 to 83), led by Queensland University of Technology, has found one in five women and one in eight men are losing sleep due to bad phone habits.
Hormone therapy helps strengthen brain connections in transgender women
In transgender women who have had their testes removed as part of the gender-affirming process, a form of estrogen called estradiol strengthens connections between areas of the brain involved in fine motor skills, learning, emotions and sensory perception, according a study to be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes
A team of engineers combined CRISPR with electronic transistors made from graphene to create a new hand-held device that can detect specific genetic mutations in a matter of minutes.
3D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better
By generating 3D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision.
Team led by Stanford and MIT predicts the useful life of batteries with data and AI
In an advance that could accelerate battery development and improve manufacturing, scientists have found how to accurately predict the useful lifespan of lithium-ion batteries, used in devices from mobile phones to electric cars.
Study: Chinese youth more hawkish than older generations
Younger Chinese are more hawkish in their foreign policy beliefs than older generations, according to new research by Cornell University professor Jessica Chen Weiss.
Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II
The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan.
Diabetes treatment may keep dementia, Alzheimer's at bay
A USC Dornsife study comparing people with diabetes, prediabetes and normal blood sugar finds that diabetes, left untreated, could mean a higher likelihood of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.
Widely used malaria treatment to prevent malaria in pregnant women
A global team of researchers, led by a research team at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), are calling for a review of drug-based strategies used to prevent malaria infections in pregnant women, in areas where there is widespread resistance to existing antimalarial medicines.
Recovery from sperm suppression due to performance-enhancing drug abuse is slow
Decreased sperm and testosterone production caused by abuse of performing-enhancing hormones may be fully reversible once men stop taking the drugs, but full recovery can take at least nine to 18 months, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed
Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey.
Anxiety-associated brain regions regulate threat responses in monkeys
Damage to parts of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region within the prefrontal cortex, heightens monkeys' defensive responses to threat, according to new research published in JNeurosci.
Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery
Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke.
Effective fear of heights treatment without a therapist using virtual reality
A fully self-guided treatment using virtual reality (VR) is effective in reducing fear of heights.
Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms
A new study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent.
NASA finds heavy rainfall around Tropical Cyclone Joaninha's center
NASA calculated the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.
New angle of attack drives cellular HIV-reservoirs to self-destruction
While current therapies for HIV can successfully manage active infection, the virus can survive in tissue reservoirs, including macrophage cells, and remain a persistent problem.
Tepper School research identifies new e-reader pricing strategy
New research by Marketing Professor Hui Li suggests a dynamic pricing strategy that also allows tech companies to capture customers at their most profitable.
Attractive businesswomen viewed as less trustworthy 'femmes fatales'
A Washington State University researcher says attractive businesswomen are considered less trustworthy, less truthful and more worthy of being fired than less attractive women.
Surge in cannabis use among youth preceded legalization in Canada
National discussions on cannabis legalization, along with increased access to medical marijuana, may have encouraged more high school students to consume the drug years before it became legal in Canada.
Hubble captures birth of giant storm on Neptune
Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope document the formation of a Great Dark Spot on Neptune for the first time, report researchers in a new study.
The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism
The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive.
The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish
Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders -- some of which are docile, others aggressive -- have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours.
Giving intravenous therapy to children at home is costly, lowers parents' quality of life
When treating patients, doctors sometimes overlook how their decisions impact a world they never see: a patient's home life.
Traffic control of cells
Researchers develop a hydrogel whose stiffness and permeability to cells can be controlled with light
New in Ethics & Human Research, March-April 2019
Anticipatory waivers of consent for pediatric biobanking, a case study of unethical US experiments in Guatemala, and more in the current issue of Ethics & Human Research.
Machine learning reveals rapid material classification
Scientists at the University of Tokyo introduced a novel machine learning algorithm for the rapid prediction of a materials properties and structures based on spectral scans.
New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil
A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a metabolic shock to cells, new research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison finds.
Endocrine disruptors alter female reproduction throughout multiple generations
Endocrine disruptors, hormone-altering chemicals that are widespread in our environment, can shape the brain through four generations, altering offspring's maternal behavior, sexual development and reproduction, according to a new animal study.
Automated drug delivery system combats low blood sugar after weight-loss surgery
A new automated drug delivery system can help prevent dangerously low blood sugar in patients who have undergone weight-loss surgery, according to a study to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
Inclusion of a crop model in a climate model to promote climate modeling
A new crop-climate model provides a good tool to investigate the relationship between crop development and climate change for global change studies.
Chinese famine and the Type 2 diabetes epidemic: Challenges of connecting the dots
The Chinese Famine of 1959-61 has been widely interpreted as an important contributor to later epidemics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitis (T2DM, but in re-examining 17 related Chinese studies researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Leiden University Medical Center, found little evidence for this association.
SUTD researchers develop a hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery
Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting.
In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration
A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust.
Hurricane Maria study warns: Future climate-driven storms may raze many tropical forests
A new study shows that damage inflicted on trees in Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria was unprecedented in modern times, and suggests that more frequent big storms whipped up by warming climate could permanently alter forests not only here, but across much of the Atlantic tropics.
The largest delta plain in Earth's history
The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic.
Ultra-sharp images make old stars look absolutely marvelous!
Using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have uncovered one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy.
Does story time with an e-book change how parents and toddlers interact?
Traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests.
Discovery of life-extension pathway in worms demonstrates new way to study aging
An enzyme-blocking molecule can extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms by as much as 45 percent, largely by modulating a cannabinoid biological pathway, according to a study from scientists at Scripps Research.
New properties of perovskite solar cells
Perovskite solar cells are lighter and cheaper than silicon, their production is non-toxic.
Outcomes for smallest infants born weighing less than 400 grams
This observational study adds to information about outcomes for the smallest infants born weighing less than 400 grams, which is less than a pound.
Abused kids use text-based services to seek help, study shows
Minors aren't just using crisis services to report suicidal thoughts and depression -- they're using them to report abuse, a new study shows.
ELSI scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells
Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves.
Can you 'catch' cancer?
Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment.
Contraceptive jewelry could offer a new family planning approach
Family planning for women might one day be as simple as putting on an earring.
Earth's deep mantle flows dynamically
As ancient ocean floors plunge over 1,000 km into the Earth's deep interior, they cause hot rock in the lower mantle to flow much more dynamically than previously thought, finds a new UCL-led study.
A petrifying virus key to evolution
Japanese researchers find a new giant virus in the hot springs of northern Japan.
Study questions value of genetic risk scores
What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background.
Researchers reveal new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair
Ramón Muñoz-Chápuli and Rita Carmona, researchers of the UMA Department of Animal Biology, have identified a new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair.
Listening to the quantum vacuum
Since the historic finding of gravitational waves from two black holes colliding over a billion light years away was made in 2015, physicists are advancing knowledge about the limits on the precision of the measurements that will help improve the next generation of tools and technology used by gravitational wave scientists.
Race at the edge of the Sun: Ions are faster than atoms
Ions move faster than atoms in the gas streams of a solar prominence.
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!
Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future.
Study suggests trees are crucial to the future of our cities
The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun.
Deep time tracking devices: Fossil barnacles reveal prehistoric whale migrations
Long-distance migrations are common for large whales, but when in their evolutionary past did whales begin to migrate and why?
Spotting hacks automatically, before the hackers do
In response to serious new security flaws found in almost every computer chip on the market today, researchers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany, in collaboration with scientists at Stanford, have developed a mathematical algorithm to automate and expedite the process of finding flaws in future designs prior to production.
More children could mean higher risk of heart disease
Public health researchers report that, in a national survey of 25,000 participants, 30 percent of parents who said they had five or more children had a heart condition.
Walking downhill after meals boosts bone health in postmenopausal women with diabetes
Walking downhill after eating can reduce bone resorption, the process in which old bone is broken down and removed from the body, in postmenopausal women with diabetes, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24, at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La.
The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides
The study focuses on wild oats and is based on precision agriculture as well as the use of multispectral images.
Mothers of fussy babies at higher risk of depressive symptoms
As FDA approval of the first postpartum depression drug hits the news, study looks at how infant fussiness and a baby's level of prematurity may influence the severity of maternal depressive symptoms.
Removal of 'zombie cells' alleviates causes of diabetes in obese mice
Mayo Clinic researchers and their collaborators have shown that when senescent cells -- also known as 'zombie cells' -- are removed from fat tissue in obese mice, severity of diabetes and a range of its causes or consequences decline or disappear.
Migrants are their country's best and brightest
It flies in the face of popular perception -- but people who choose to emigrate are those with the best education.
Aspirin to fight an expensive global killer infection
Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia.
New paper on the phylogeny of the Brassicaceae
A recent study from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, published in the New Phytologist, helps resolve these issues by reporting new insights into the relationships among Brassicaceae species
New cellulose-based material gives three sensors in one
Cellulose soaked in a carefully designed polymer mixture acts as a sensor to measure pressure, temperature and humidity -- at the same time!
Optical toric code platform sets new record
A research group led by professor PAN Jianwei and LU Chaoyang of University of Science and Technology of China successfully designed the largest planar code platform at present using photons, and demonstrated path-independent property in optical system for the first time.
Time-restricted eating may help prevent breast cancer, mouse study suggests
Changing when you eat rather than what you eat may prove to be a dietary intervention against breast cancer, suggests a new mouse study to be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
Physicists create Star Wars style holograms
For many years we have heard that holographic technology is one step closer to realizing Star Trek's famous Holodeck, a virtual reality stage that simulate any object in 3D as if they are real.
Handshakes or contracts?
A new study of US fire departments has found improvements differ for property damage and personal injuries or deaths, depending on whether the collaborations were informal, formal, or based on formal contracts without any prior history of working together.
Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship into a bottle
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.
Drug diversity in bacteria
Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms.
Groin and hips of hockey players examined in five-second test
Five seconds is enough to assess the status of a hockey player's groin.
Cesarean deliveries in India: Too many and yet too few
Had India fallen prey to the epidemic of cesarean currently affecting many countries in the world?

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.