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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 27, 2019


Codifying the universal language of honey bees
In a paper appearing in April's issue of Animal Behaviour researchers decipher the instructive messages encoded in the insects' movements, called waggle dances.
Patients say lack of physician guidance and fear of side effects are why they don't take statins as prescribed
Despite national guidelines indicating that statins can lower risk of heart attack and stroke, many patients who could benefit do not take them.
Lipid vesicles transmit luminous or electrical signals
Fluorescent molecules or charges enable liposomes to transmit light or electrical signals.
EU consumption results in high carbon emissions from tropical deforestation, studies show
A sixth of all emissions resulting from the typical diet of an EU citizen can be directly linked to deforestation of tropical forests.
People 'hear' flashes due to disinhibited flow of signals around the brain, suggests study
A synaesthesia-like effect in which people 'hear' silent flashes or movement, such as in popular 'noisy GIFs' and memes, could be due to a reduction of inhibition of signals that travel between visual and auditory areas of the brain, according to a new study led by researchers at City, University of London.
Step it up: Does running cadence matter? Not as much as previously thought
Contrary to long-standing popular belief, running at a prescribed, one-size-fits-all ''optimal'' cadence doesn't play as big a role in speed and efficiency as once thought.
How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats
A study conducted by a team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) sheds new light on how exactly ultraviolet (UV) emitting and non-UV emitting street lamps influence the activity of bats in the Berlin metropolitan area and whether tree cover might mitigate any effect of light pollution.
Donor muscle training before transplantation expedites rehabilitation process in patients
Researchers at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience of the Higher School of Economics have proposed to train transplanted muscles in advance with new movements so that the brain can learn to use them more quickly after autotransplantation.
NASA's Aqua Satellite keeps an 'eye' on Tropical Cyclone Joaninha
Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a visible eye remained in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is it continued moving through the central Southern Indian Ocean.
Vitamin C can shorten the length of stay in the ICU
Vitamin C administration shortened the length of stay in the intensive care unit on average by 8 percent in 12 trials with 1766 patients according to a meta-analysis published in Nutrients.
Rivers raged on Mars late into its history
A new study by University of Chicago scientists catalogued these rivers to conclude that significant river runoff persisted on Mars later into its history than previously thought.
Stanford autonomous car learns to handle unknown conditions
In order to make autonomous cars navigate more safely in difficult conditions -- like icy roads -- researchers are developing new control systems that learn from real-world driving experiences while leveraging insights from physics.
Exercise helps prevent cartilage damage caused by arthritis
Exercise helps to prevent the degradation of cartilage caused by osteoarthritis, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
Laser physics: Downsizing the particle accelerator
Munich physicists have succeeded in demonstrating plasma wakefield acceleration of subatomic particles in a miniaturized, laser-driven model.
GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging
The GRAVITY instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has made the first direct observation of an exoplanet using optical interferometry.
White people's eating habits produce most greenhouse gases
White individuals disproportionately affect the environment through their eating habits by eating more foods that require more water and release more greenhouse gases through their production compared to foods black and Latinx individuals eat, according to a new report published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology.
Harvesting water energy using slippery surfaces
Inspired by natural pitcher plant surface that exhibits a peculiar slippery property, a novel slippery lubricant-impregnated porous surface (SLIPS) based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), referred to as SLIPS-TENG, is developed to efficiently harvest energy from the most abundant, affordable resource, water.
Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics
Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge.
Negative equity house price risk could be ended, new research confirms
The risk of house prices crashing and leaving millions of homeowners in negative equity could be removed if the financial sector adopts new models of investment for housing that are widely used in other areas of finance, according to major new research.
New muscular disease: Myoglobinopathy
Institute (IDIBELL) led by Dr. Montse Olivé have described in Nature Communications a new muscular disease caused by a mutation in the myoglobin gene.
Dissolving the gordian knot
In a great stride toward finding an effective treatment for early-stage neurodegenerative diseases, UC Santa Barbara neurobiologist Kenneth S.
Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter
A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office.
Engineers craft the basic building block for electrospun nanofibers
Imagine wounds that heal without scars. It's possible with electrospun nanofibers.
Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin
A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.
UTSA study quantifies injuries and combat casualty care trends during War on Terror
UTSA researcher, Jeffrey Howard, published an article today in JAMA Surgery that takes a closer look at the casualties of war and the trauma care they received during the military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq that began after September 11, 2001.
On the keto diet? Ditch the cheat day, says UBC study
The often embraced 'cheat day' is a common theme in many diets and the popular ketogenic diet is no exception.
High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack
Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes -- venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes.
Historical trade of tortoiseshell reveals origins of modern wildlife trafficking networks
Monterey Bay Aquarium research finds that historical tortoiseshell trade routes may have established the groundwork for modern illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.
Gene transfer improves diabetes-linked heart ailment
Researchers with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the University of California San Diego have shown that a gene transfer technique can combat heart dysfunction caused by diabetes.
Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics.
Mini microscope is the new GoPro for studies of brain disease in living mice
Working with mice, a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has developed a relatively inexpensive, portable mini microscope that could improve scientists' ability to image the effects of cancer, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions in the brains of living and active mice over time.
Tumor-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28: Substantial differences identified
Researchers from the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg (JMU) have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities.
Study shows arctic warming contributes to drought
According to new research involving a University of Wyoming scientist, changes similar to those after the ice age 10,000 years ago could be in store today because a warming Arctic weakens the temperature difference between the tropics and the poles.
Autonomous weed control via smart robots
Soybean fields are becoming increasingly infested with a glyphosate-resistant weed called 'palmer amaranth.' One pesticide currently used for controlling it is 'Dicamba,' but it has devastating effects on adjacent areas, because it tends to drift when sprayed during windy conditions.
Cities under pressure
Experts at Newcastle University, UK, highlight the challenge we face to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase cities' resilience to extreme weather and also give people quality space to live in.
Physicists constrain dark matter
Researchers from Russia, Finland, and the U.S. have put a constraint on the theoretical model of dark matter particles by analyzing data from astronomical observations of active galactic nuclei.
Development of a technology to produce dorsal cortical neurons
Expectation on the identification of the mechanism of causing brain diseases and regeneration treatment for brain tissues
Helping infants survive brain cancer
Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a particularly challenging type of brain cancer: The tumor most commonly arises in infants under the age of one.
Researchers beginning to uncover the mystery of hagfish's zombie hearts 
University of Guelph researchers deprived hagfish hearts of oxygen and then fed the organs saline containing either glucose, glycerol or no fuel source.
New potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer discovered
Cancer cells demand enormous amounts of molecular 'food' to survive and grow, and a study published March 27 online in Nature by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have identified a new approach to starve the cells of one of the most common and deadly cancers, pancreatic cancer.
Cannabis during pregnancy bumps psychosis risk in offspring
Pregnant women who use cannabis may slightly increase the risk their unborn child will develop psychosis later in life, suggests new research from Washington University in St.
U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks
What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, the surprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells.
New cryptic bird species discovered
Through persistent detective work and advances in genetic sequencing technology, Louisiana State University Museum of Natural Science researchers have discovered a new species of bird on Borneo -- the Cream-eyed Bulbul, or Pycnonotus pseudosimplex.
Had enough water? Brain's thirst centers make a gut check
Until recently, scientists believed that a brain region called the hypothalamus makes us thirsty when it detects a drop in the hydration of our blood.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Low levels of public trust during violent conflict may have thwarted attempts to control Ebola
Mistrust and misinformation can stop people taking measures to prevent the spread of Ebola virus disease (EVD), increasing the likelihood that they refuse vaccination, according to a study with nearly 1,000 people published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
Eating small amounts of red and processed meats may increase risk of death
A new study out of Loma Linda University Health suggests that eating red and processed meats -- even in small amounts -- may increase the risk of death from all causes, especially cardiovascular disease.
Two novel pancreatic cancer cell lines with highly metastatic activity were established and analyzed
A recent research established two human pancreatic cancer cell sublines with high metastasis potential, MIA PaCa-2 In8 and Panc-1 In8, by Matrigel induction assay.
Many NHS partnerships with drug companies are out of public sight
NHS organisations are entering into working partnerships with drug companies, but they are not making the details, and even existence, of many of these deals available to the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today
A simple strategy to improve your mood in 12 minutes
We all have a remedy -- a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate -- for lifting our spirits when we're in a bad mood.
Artificial intelligence can improve X-ray identification of pacemakers in emergencies
Researchers have created new artificial intelligence software that can identify cardiac rhythm devices in x-rays more accurately and quickly than current methods.
Common medication used in pregnancy may lead to obesity in children
Metformin, a common drug used for type 2 diabetes, has several benefits when the mother has PCOS.
Solving a hairy forensic problem
For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning.
Glowing tumors show scientists where cancer drugs are working
Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of a cancer remain unaffected.
Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region
A comparison of seven European countries shows that the amount of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater reflects the prevalence of clinical antibiotic resistance in the region.
Kids store 1.5 megabytes of information to master their native language
Learning one's native language may seem effortless. But new research from UC Berkeley suggests that language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do.
New, more realistic simulator will improve self-driving vehicle safety before road testing
Scientists from the University of Maryland, Baidu Research and the University of Hong Kong have developed data-driven simulation technology that combines photos, videos, real-world trajectory, and behavioral data into a scalable, realistic autonomous driving simulator
The sword of a Hispano-Muslim warlord is digitized in 3D
At age 90, Ali Atar, one of the main military chiefs of King Boabdil of Granada, fought to his death in the Battle of Lucena in 1483.
Massive earthquakes provide new insight into deep Earth
In a first-ever study of two of the largest deep earthquakes ever recorded in human history, FSU researchers reveal new and surprising information about our planet's mysterious, ever-changing interior.
Osteoblastic cell stimulation by pulsed electromagnetic fields
Bone fracture healing can be augmented with the application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), but a consensus regarding idealized conditions is lacking.
Self-sustaining, bioengineered blood vessels could replace damaged vessels in patients
A research team has bioengineered blood vessels that safely and effectively integrated into the native circulatory systems of 60 patients with end-stage kidney failure over a four-year phase 2 clinical trial.
Drexel study: Smartphone app detects diet cheat
According to a recent study, led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, a first-of-its-kind smartphone app called OnTrack can predict ahead of time when users are likely to lapse in their weight loss plan and help them stay on track.
Using smartphones and laptops to simulate deadly heart arrhythmias
Using graphics processing chips designed for gaming applications and software that runs on ordinary web browsers, researchers have moved the modeling of deadly spiral wave heart arrhythmias to less costly computers, and even to high-end smartphones.
Researchers advance effort to manage parasitic roundworms
Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage.
Computer program predicts risk of deadly irregular heart beats
Combining a wealth of information derived from previous studies with data from more than 500 patients, an international team led by researchers from Johns Hopkins has developed a computer-based set of rules that more accurately predicts when patients with a rare heart condition might benefit -- or not -- from lifesaving implanted defibrillators.
Newly discovered role for climbing fibers: Conveying a sensory snapshot to the cerebellum
Though there is a wealth knowledge supporting the idea that sensory cues benefit motor learning, the precise brain circuitry and mechanisms tying these two together has been debated in recent years.
Study: To keep leftover opioids out of harm's way, give surgery patients disposal bags
Many surgery patients head home from the hospital with opioid pain medicine prescriptions, and most will have pills left over after they finish recovering from their procedure.
New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks.
What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem
Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists.
Woman with novel gene mutation lives almost pain-free
A woman in Scotland can feel virtually no pain due to a mutation in a previously-unidentified gene, according to a research paper co-led by UCL.
Gut microbiome research takes center stage in APS-ASPET Presidential Symposium series
Researchers will speak in a four-part series on the gut microbiome and its role in wound recovery, hypertension and nervous system function.
Mars' rivers flowed stronger and more recently than previous estimates
A global survey of Mars by Edwin Kite and colleagues concludes that for a given area, the planet's rivers were wider than those on Earth today.
Transplanting adult spinal cord tissues: A new strategy of repair spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury repair is one of the most challenging medical problems, and no effective therapeutic methods has been developed.
Implant to better track brain chemical gone rogue after neurotrauma
Purdue University engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking a brain chemical elevated in brain diseases and neurotrauma.
Heating up tumors could make CAR T therapy more effective, study finds
A preclinical study led by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer suggests that heating solid tumors during CAR T-cell therapy can enhance the treatment's success.
Adhesive formed from bee spit and flower oil could form basis of new glues
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology are looking to a bee 'glue' as a model for a bioinspired adhesive because of its unique properties and ability to remain sticky through a range of conditions.
Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease
Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say.
Birds bug out over coffee
New research conducted by the University of Delaware has found that birds are as picky as coffee snobs when it comes to the trees they'll migrate to for a summer habitat.
Artificial intelligence can predict premature death, study finds
Computers which are capable of teaching themselves to predict premature death could greatly improve preventative healthcare in the future, suggests a new study by experts at the University of Nottingham.
Lurie Children's offers kids virtual escape from intensive care unit
For the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), patients get a chance to scuba dive, snowboard, and go on a safari or other adventures, all from their hospital bed.
Fluorine: Toxic and aggressive, but widely used
In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, it shows its sunny side - but elemental fluorine is extremely aggressive and highly toxic.
A more accurate method to diagnose cancer subtypes
Garvan researchers have developed a method for detecting the products of 'fusion' genes in cancer cells more accurately than current clinical methods.
Russian physicists obtained data on particles self-organization in ultracold dusty plasma
It is for the first time that physicists investigated the behavior of particles in a dusty plasma at a temperature below 2 K.
Researchers optimize aptamer with enhanced myelin-binding properties for MS treatment
A new study has demonstrated the enhanced ability of an optimized 20-nucleotide derivative of a larger DNA aptamer to bind myelin in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.
Pairing music with medication offers potential therapeutic strategy to manage pain
Researchers at University of Utah Health found pairing music with one of four pain medications offered a promising complementary strategy to treat pain.
Data flows from NASA's TESS Mission, leads to discovery of Saturn-sized planet
Astronomers who study stars have contributed to the analysis of a planet discovered by NASA's new TESS Mission.
Vapor drives a liquid-solid transition in a molecular system
The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by researchers at Kanazawa University.
Southern Europeans, non-Europeans less likely to have matched stem cell donors
Although the pool of registered bone marrow donors has increased in recent years, a new study suggests that most people of southern-European and non-European descent are unlikely to have a suitable match if they need a life-saving bone marrow transplant.
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions.
More bang for the climate buck: study identifies hotspots for adaptation funding
Using a combination of crop models and expertise from farmers and others -- and applying them to our current trajectory of high greenhouse gas emissions -- scientists built a tool to assess climate risk vulnerability to help pinpoint communities in need of support for adaptation and mitigation.
Let's not make big waves
Due to its potential to make computers faster and smartphones more efficient, spintronics is considered a promising concept for the future of electronics.
Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget
Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study led by Illinois State Geological Survey researchers.
Biophysicists use machine learning to understand, predict dynamics of worm behavior
Biophysicists have used an automated method to model a living system -- the dynamics of a worm perceiving and escaping pain.
Traveling-wave tubes: The unsung heroes of space exploration
What do televisions and space exploration have in common? No, we're not talking about a cheesy physics joke; rather, this is the story of an often-overlooked piece of equipment that deserves a place in the annals of telecommunication history.
Dramatic housing transformation in sub-Saharan Africa revealed for first time
Housing with improved water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015, according to new research published in Nature.
3D printer threads electronic fibers onto fabrics
The potential for wearable electronics goes far beyond smart watches, but our current options for battery packs and circuit boards don't make for the most comfortable E-socks.
Lying, sitting or standing: Resting postures determined by animals' size
Cows always lie on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired.
How nerve cells control misfolded proteins
Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell and directs them towards disposal.
Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault
A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.
Low-dose radiation therapy improves delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles to brain tumors
A new study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that radiation therapy may increase the uptake of therapeutic nanoparticles by glioblastomas, raising the possibility of using both growth-factor-targeted and immune-system-based therapies against the deadly brain tumor.
Social media has remarkably small impact on Americans' beliefs
Social media had only a small influence on how much people believed falsehoods about candidates and issues in the last two presidential elections, a pair of new national studies found.
Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence.
Consider non-surgical brain stimulation for severe depression, say experts
Non-surgical brain stimulation should be considered as alternative or add-on treatments for adults with severe forms of depression, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.
Study of female weightlifters crushes stereotype
A new study shows that elite women weightlifters have the same amount, and in some cases more, of the muscle fibers needed for the sport compared to their male counterparts.
Researchers aim to demystify complex ag water requirements for Produce Safety Rule
In an effort to ensure the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables for consumers, Cornell University's Produce Safety Alliance is helping to explain complex federal food safety rules and develop new ways to assess agricultural water use.
Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat
A global, collaborative effort led by the Earlham Institute, UK and CIMMYT, Mexico sheds light on the genetic basis of biomass accumulation and efficiency in use of light, both of which are bottlenecks in yield improvement in wheat.
Drug shortages: Limited warnings, followed by rationing and hoarding
In a national survey, hospital pharmacy managers report a lack of advance notice, frequent drug shortages, hoarding and even rationing.
Retinal prion disease study redefines role for brain cells
National Institutes of Health scientists studying the progression of inherited and infectious eye diseases that can cause blindness have found that microglia, a type of nervous system cell suspected to cause retinal damage, surprisingly had no damaging role during prion disease in mice.
Factors associated with increased survival among US military combat casualties in Afghanistan, Iraq
This study analyzed combat casualty statistics to look at factors associated with reductions in mortality during the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Putting the science in science communication
Building public trust in science is about more than just providing information and improving science literacy, she says.
Offspring of older mothers are more responsive to aging interventions, study finds
Maternal age affects how well offspring respond to dietary interventions that are known to increase lifespan, scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory report in a rotifer study.
Spinning-prism microscope helps gather stem cells for regenerative medicine
Pluripotent stem cells are crucial to regenerative medicine, but better screening methods are needed to isolate safe and effective cells for medical use.
Human protein produced in CHO-cells can save donor blood
Researchers from DTU Biosustain have successfully produced mammalian cell lines (CHO) that can produce 1.2 g/L recombinant Alpha-1-antitrypsin proteins with human glycosylation profiles.
Simplified synthesis
For the first time researchers discovered a simple and highly efficient way to produce certain kinds of organic compounds.
2019 Global Food Policy Report: Crises in rural areas threatens progress in hunger and poverty reduction
IFPRI's 2019 Global Food Policy Report highlights the urgency of rural revitalization to address the crisis in rural areas.
Pressure makes best cooling
Recently, an international research team led by Professor LI Bing from the Institute of Metal Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that a class of disordered materials, called plastic crystals, exhibits record-large barocaloric effects under very weak pressure.
Study confirms and ranks nursery value of coastal habitats
Comprehensive analysis suggests that mangroves and seagrasses provide the greatest value as 'nurseries' for young fishes and invertebrates, providing key guidance for managers of threatened marine resources.
Abandon the term 'second victim' say families of patients who died after medical errors
Families of patients who died after medical errors argue that it's time to abandon the term 'second victim' to describe doctors who are involved in a medical error.
Stop the exploitation of migrant agricultural workers across Italy
Writing in The BMJ today, Dr Claudia Marotta and colleagues say more than 1,500 agricultural workers have died as a result of their work over the past six years, while others have been killed by the so-called 'Caporali' who are modern slave masters.
Thirst controlled by signal from the gut
Scientists have discovered a new way that the gut talks to the brain, by sending messages about the salt content of the stomach and intestines.
Rejuvenation of aging cells helps to cure osteoarthritis through gene therapy
Recently, scientists from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Peking University and the Institute of Biophysics of CAS, found a protein factor, CBX4, safeguarded hMSCs against cellular senescence through the regulation of nucleolar architecture and function.
Duke-NUS study: New technique shows promise for heart muscle regeneration
Scientists led by Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, have demonstrated a novel technique using a heart muscle associated protein that reliably turns stem cells into heart-healing muscle fibres.
New approach for potential treatment of liver cancer patients with Hep B virus infection
A new treatment approach using engineered Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) specific T cells has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of HBV related liver cancer in a landmark translational research study between Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore General Hospital and Lion TCR.
The salt-craving neurons
Pass the potato chips, please! New research discovers neural circuits that regulate craving and satiation for salty tastes.
Increase the legal purchase age to reduce smoking rates in young people, urges expert
Increasing the legal age for tobacco purchase should be combined with other measures to reduce smoking rates in young people, argues an expert in The BMJ today.
Rural America needs more headache specialists, WVU researcher says
West Virginia has just half of the neurologists it needs.

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#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
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