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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 01, 2019


Laser technology helps researchers scrutinize cancer cells
Photoacoustic microscopy technique allows researchers to analyze metabolic characteristics of cancer cells with laser light and high-frequency ultrasonic sensing.
Just an hour of weekly walking staves off disability
Just one hour a week of brisk walking -- as if you are late to an appointment or trying to make a train -- staves off disability in older adults with arthritis pain, or aching or stiffness in a knee, hip, ankle or foot, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.
Compression-only CPR increases survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
In a Swedish study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, bystander CPR rates nearly doubled and compression-only, or Hands-Only CPR, rates increased six-fold over the 18-year review.
Tobacco use makes precancerous cells that fertilize cancer growth
Inhibiting EGFR along with PI3K may negate EGFR escape route that precancerous cells provide to cancer cells to avoid PI3K inhibitors.
Chicago tops list of most dangerous cities for migrating birds
Scientists at the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology ranked metropolitan areas where, due to a combination of light pollution and geography, birds are at the greatest risk of becoming attracted to and disoriented by lights and crashing into buildings.
Cesarean delivery associated with higher risk of severe complications for the mother
Cesarean delivery is associated with a higher risk of severe complications for the mother compared with vaginal delivery, especially in women aged 35 and older, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Data from two KEYNOTE trials show pembrolizumab benefited patients with advanced SCLC
The anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab (Keytruda) showed promising antitumor activity with durable responses in patients with pretreated, advanced small cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to results from a pooled analysis of the two clinical trials, the phase 1b KEYNOTE-028 and the phase II KEYNOTE-158, presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
London cyclists warned evening commute has the dirtiest air, so pick a clean route home
Cyclists in London should take a different route back home during evening peak-time hours to avoid breathing in harmful black carbon from vehicles.
Sleepovers reduce stress in shelter dogs
Foster care provides valuable information about dog behavior that can help homeless dogs living in shelters find forever homes.
Colorado drug takes aim at cancer metastasis
Targeting SIX1/EYA 'dramatically reduces breast cancer metastasis,' according to University of Colorado Cancer Center study.
Gender parity: Not a foregone conclusion in all fields
Women constitute approximately 47 percent of the workforce yet are underrepresented at the highest levels of business, government, medical and academic hierarchies.
Face-to-face workshops increase household preparedness for disaster
Face-to-face workshops based on the psychology of behaviour change and disaster preparedness can be used to prompt households to take action to protect themselves against disasters such as earthquakes, fires and floods, a new UCL-led study has found.
Juice plant pathogen could be treated with newly identified antibacterial agent
There's nothing like a glass of orange juice to start the morning, but prices have soared as the Florida citrus industry fights a citrus greening disease epidemic that has been drying out juice oranges and reducing crop yield.
Sugar could be sweet solution to respiratory disease
Restriction or inhalation of common sugar could one day treat a range of respiratory diseases, according to new research led by University of Manchester biologists.
CABI-led study recommends improvements to how impacts of non-native species are assessed
CABI has led an international team of non-native species specialists who have compiled a list of recommendations to improve the way in which the impact of a range of invasive pests -- such as the tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta -- are assessed, potentially helping towards ensuring greater global food security.
Climate change threat to dolphins' survival
An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates on the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia.
New therapy targets cause of adult-onset muscular dystrophy
The compound designed at Scripps Research, called Cugamycin, works by recognizing toxic RNA repeats and destroying the garbled gene transcript.
Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems.
New therapeutic strategy to prevent gastrointestinal disease
In a study published in Nature Medicine, the researchers report new evidence suggesting that specifically targeting MLCK1 may be effective in both preventing and treating gastrointestinal disease by preserving and restoring barrier function, respectively.
Panvigilance -- a strategy to integrate biomarkers in clinical trials to enhance drug safety
Modern medicines have positively contributed to public health and changed the ways human diseases are prevented and treated.
Rise of religion pre-dates Incas at Lake Titicaca
An ancient group of people made ritual offerings to supernatural deities near the Island of the Sun in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, about 500 years earlier than the Incas, according to an international team of researchers.
Farming for natural profits in China
Expanding monoculture threatens valuable services from land, such as flood control, water purification and climate stabilization.
'Smart' pajamas could monitor and help improve sleep (video)
If you've ever dreamed about getting a good night's sleep, your answer may someday lie in data generated by your sleepwear.
AACR: Adavosertib speeds cancer cells into the wall of mitotic catastrophe
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at AACR 2019 shows that inhibiting the action of Wee1 speeds cancer cells with damaged DNA through cell cycle, leading to mitotic catastrophe.
Cancer preventive vaccine showed promising results in preclinical model of Lynch syndrome
Vaccination with as few as four tumor antigens generated antigen-specific responses, reduced intestinal tumors, and improved survival in a mouse model of Lynch syndrome, suggesting that it may be possible to develop a cancer preventive vaccine for patients with Lynch syndrome, according to data presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
AACR 2019: Tarloxotinib promising against NRG1-fusion cancers
University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at AACR 2019 shows that the clinical-stage drug, tarloxotinib, is active against NRG1-fusion cancers, in addition to the HER2/EGFR cancers for which the drug was originally designed.
Experts discover historic roots of Medicare for All, public option and free-market proposals
As political leaders debate the future of the US health care system, a pair of health financing experts discovered that all of the current proposals -- from Medicare for All to 'repeal and replace' -- have been circulating in various forms since the 1940s.
Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' device captures cancer cells from blood
A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood.
BU finds Medicare Advantage networks are broad and getting broader
A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds that networks in Medicare Advantage -- a private plan alternative to traditional Medicare -- are relatively broad and may be getting broader.
Blood test helps accurate, rapid diagnosis for pre-eclampsia
A new study published today in The Lancet, has found that a simple blood test can help make the diagnosis for a common and potentially fatal pregnancy complication.
We've been thinking of how ice forms in cirrus clouds all wrong
Pores in atmospheric particles allow water to condense, leading to the formation of ice crystals in humid but unsaturated air.
Traffic jam in the cell: How are proteins assigned to specific transporters?
Special carriers ensure that proteins are transported to where they are needed in the cell.
Enhanced recovery after spine surgery: 15 new articles in the April Neurosurgical Focus
The April issue of Neurosurgical Focus contains 15 new articles on the principles of enhanced recovery after surgery and how these principles relate to spine surgery.
Project delivers low-cost future network architecture for mobile operators
Lower operating costs, enhanced performance, flexibility, resilience and interoperability in 5G networks are all available to mobile operators following the recent completion of a major research project.
OU engineers discover novel role of water in production of renewable fuels
University of Oklahoma engineers in collaboration with the University of Tulsa have discovered a novel approach for the water-assisted upgrading of the renewable chemical, furfural, doubling or tripling the rate of conversion.
Polythene films strong as aluminum could be used for windows, screens and phones
Research led by Professor Ton Peijs of WMG at the University of Warwick and Professor Cees Bastiaansen at Queen Mary University of London, has devised a processing technique that can create transparent polythene film that can be stronger as aluminum but at a fraction of the weight, and which could be used use in glazing, windscreens, visors and displays in ways that add strength and resilience while reducing weight.
Can technology improve even though people don't understand what they are doing?
New experimental work by an ASU research team suggests that cultural evolution can generate new adaptive knowledge even though people don't understand what they are doing.
Ethical questions raised on body donation after medically assisted death
There are issues about the appropriateness of accepting or using MAID body donations; communication with donors including consenting processes, and the transparency surrounding MAID donation with staff, faculty and students.
Adults with mental health, substance disorders more likely subject to Medicaid work rules
A new research study has found that Medicaid enrollees with behavioral health and other chronic conditions are less likely to be working part or full time than those without these conditions, making it less likely they will meet new or proposed work requirements for Medicaid that have been implemented or proposed in some states.
UTSA researcher studies bias in prosecutor filing trends
UTSA Criminal Justice professors Richard Hartley and Rob Tillyer have studied the factors affecting whether prosecutors decline to charge someone arrested for a federal crime.
Depression, obesity, chronic pain could be treated by targeting the same key protein
Major depression, obesity and chronic pain are all linked to the effects of one protein, called FKBP51.
Edible antibodies to treat and prevent gastrointestinal disorders
Therapeutic antibodies are increasingly being used in the clinic for the treatment of various diseases.
Counties with more trees and shrubs spend less on Medicare, study finds
A new study finds that Medicare costs tend to be lower in counties with more forests and shrublands than in counties dominated by other types of land cover.
Well-known drug has less risk for preterm delivery in PCOS
Metformin significantly reduces the risk of late miscarriages and preterm births for women with PCOS.
Pregnant women with long commutes to work at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes
In a study published in Economics & Human Biology researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that pregnant women who commute long-distance to work have an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, including having babies born at a low-birth weight.
Fossil fly with an extremely long proboscis sheds light on the insect pollination origin
A long-nosed fly from the Jurassic of Central Asia, reported by Russian paleontologists, provides new evidence that insects have started serving as pollinators long before the emergence of flowering plants.
Marine protected reserves do more than restore fish
In a new analysis of the effectiveness of marine protected areas worldwide, University of Massachusetts Amherst marine ecologist Brian Cheng and colleagues report that reserves not only replenish target fish populations, they also restore ecological functioning.
Novel strategy fights back bacterial antibiotic resistance
A new strategy to combat antibiotic resistance has emerged from a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine.
Toward novel computing and fraud detection technologies with on-demand polymers
Drawing inspiration from nature, researchers are making polymers with ever-more precise compositions on demand.
Tiger geckos in Vietnam could be the next species sold into extinction, shows a new survey
While information about the conservation status of the tiger gecko species is largely missing, these Asian lizards are already particularly vulnerable to extinction.
Air pollution caused by corn production increases mortality rate in US
A new study establishes that environmental damage caused by corn production results in 4,300 premature deaths annually in the United States, representing a monetized cost of $39 billion.
New study measures UV-filters in seawater and corals from Hawaii
Scientists have completed the first comprehensive assessment of UV-filters in surface seawater, sediment, and coral tissue from multiple coral reefs around the island of Oahu, Hawaii.
Thalamus and cerebral cortex interactions influence the decision on sensory perceptions
When we receive a stimulus, sensory information is transmitted by the afferent nerves to the thalamus which in turn, like a relay, forwards the information to the sensory cortex to process it and consciously perceive the stimulus.
Brain growth inhibited by heavy alcohol use
New research in nonhuman primates shows that heavy use of alcohol can actually slow the rate of growth in developing brains.
How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie.
Be the change you want to see in the world
Individuals have as big a role to play in tackling climate change as major corporations but only if they can be encouraged to make significant lifestyle changes by effective government policy, a major new European study co-authored by a University of Sussex academic has found.
Intestinal bacteria can be used to predict occurrence of colorectal cancer
By identifying signature of 16 disease-related microbial species, this international study with Brazilian participation may contribute to develop predictive tests valid for populations with different dietary cultures.
Human activity disrupting iconic African ecosystem, Syracuse biologist finds
A Syracuse University researcher has confirmed that Africa's Serengeti-Mara ecosystem -- one of the largest, most protected on Earth -- may be imperiled, due to increased human activity at its border.
New 'blue-green' solution for recycling world's batteries
Rice University materials scientists demonstrate an environmentally friendly solution to remove valuable cobalt and lithium metals from spent lithium-ion batteries.
Skyrmions could provide next generation data storage
Scientists at the Universities of Birmingham, Bristol and Colorado, Boulder have moved a step closer to developing the next generation of data storage and processing devices, using an emerging science called skyrmionics.
Is conception by IVF associated with childhood cancer risk?
This study compared the risk of childhood cancer diagnosed in the first decade of life among children conceived by in vitro fertilization with those children conceived naturally.
Uncovering the secrets of ancient rock art using 'X-ray vision'
Prehistoric rock paintings are a source of fascination. Aside from their beauty, there's deep meaning in these strokes, which depict ancient rituals and important symbols.
Bioengineers developed 3D structures from crab shells to replace damaged tissues
A team of scientists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University used 3D printing to create biocompatible structures on the basis of chitin obtained from crab shells.
Mental health stigma, fueled by religious belief, may prevent latinos from seeking help
Religious and cultural beliefs may discourage many Latinos in the United States from seeking treatment for depression and other mental health disorders, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds.
Study links insurance coverage to access to hospital care
Compared to privately insured patients, individuals who lack insurance or use Medicaid are more likely to be transferred to another hospital after receiving initial treatment in the emergency department (ED).
Study shows how light therapy might help premature babies avoid vision problems
Scientists discovered a light-dependent molecular pathway that regulates how blood vessels develop in the eye.
Building blocks of DNA and RNA could have appeared together before life began on Earth
Scientists for the first time have found strong evidence that RNA and DNA could have arisen from the same set of precursor molecules even before life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago.
ESA tipsheet for April 1, 2019
Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers: Artificial lights from cities cause disruption among nocturnally migrating birds; How your age can predict your attitude toward nature; Thinking outside the box when cities are the last chance for saving species; Using new tech to keep a finger on Earth's pulse; Building a global research network to track wildlife in cities.
New polymer mixture creates ultra-sensitive heat sensor
Scientists at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics have developed an ultra-sensitive heat sensor that is flexible, transparent and printable.
'Featherweight oxygen' discovery opens window on nuclear symmetry
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered and characterized a new form of oxygen dubbed 'featherweight oxygen' -- the lightest-ever version of the familiar chemical element oxygen, with only three neutrons to its eight protons.
Targeted drug for leukemia tested at Penn Medicine helps patients live longer
An inhibitor drug that targets a specific mutation in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) helps patients live almost twice as long as those who receive chemotherapy.
URI researcher calculates temperature inside moon to help reveal its inner structure
Little is known about the inner structure of the Moon, but a major step forward was made by a URI scientist who conducted experiments that enabled her to determine the temperature at the boundary of the Moon's core and mantle.
Are the uninsured and medicaid patients more likely to be transferred to another hospital?
This study analyzed 215,000 emergency department (ED) visits to 160 US hospitals to see if patients with the common conditions of pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma were more likely to be discharged from the ED or transferred to another hospital after being stabilized based on their insurance status.
Gilteritinib improved survival for patients with acute myeloid leukemia
Treatment with the FLT3-targeted therapeutic gilteritinib (Xospata) improved survival for patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring a FLT3 mutation compared with standard chemotherapy regimens, according to results from the ADMIRAL phase III clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
UM researchers publish new discoveries on bacterial viruses
University of Montana researchers have published new insights in the Journal Science on how bacteria cause infections, which may help with future infection treatments.
Drinking diplomacy
Using newly discovered archival materials, Igor Fedyukin of the Higher School of Economics, in collaboration with Robert Collis (Drake University) and Ernest A.
Complex artefacts don't prove brilliance of our ancestors
Artefacts such as bows and arrows do not necessarily prove our ancestors had sophisticated reasoning and understanding of how these tools worked, new research suggests.
Awake lumbar interbody fusion
This article provides the reader with a glimpse of how effective lumbar surgery in select patients can be when performed without general anesthesia, open surgery, or a long convalescence in the hospital.
Researchers discover how tumor-killing immune cells attack lymphomas in living mice
In a study that will be published April 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from the Institut Pasteur and INSERM reveal that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can induce tumor regression by directly targeting and killing cancer cells, uncovering new details of how these immune cells work and how their effectiveness could be improved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other B cell cancers.
NASA finds wind shear tearing apart Subtropical Cyclone Joaninha
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed that strong wind shear was adversely affecting Subtropical Cyclone Joaninha in the Southern Indian Ocean.
It is not necessary to understand a technology in order to improve it!
Are the technologies produced by human civilisations the result of our intellectual abilities or our capacity for imitation?
AD alloyed nanoantennas for temperature-feedback identification of viruses and explosives
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), ITMO University and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) developed a method for efficient mass production of silicon-germanium fully alloyed nanoantennas.
How the brain finds meaning in metaphor
Whether you bend a rod or bend the rules, the brain processes the word 'bend' similarly, with the sensory motor region playing a key role, according to new research by University of Arizona assistant professor of psychology Vicky Lai.
The hotter it gets, the more forests act as insulators
Using data from about a hundred sites worldwide, an international research team has demonstrated that forest cover acts as a global thermal insulator, by cooling the understory when the air temperature is high.
Key brain region for navigating familiar places identified
UCL scientists have discovered the key brain region for navigating well-known places, helping explain why brain damage seen in early stages of Alzheimer's disease can cause such severe disorientation.
Putting a new spin on Majorana fermions
Scientists have proposed a new method for producing more robust Majorana fermions, a kind of quasiparticle that could act as stable bits of information in next-generation quantum computers.
The evolution of bird-of-paradise sex chromosomes revealed
Birds-of-paradise are a group of songbird species, and are known for their magnificent male plumage and bewildering sexual display.
Invasive round gobies may be poised to decimate endangered French Creek mussels
The round goby -- a small, extremely prolific, invasive fish from Europe -- poses a threat to endangered freshwater mussels in northwestern Pennsylvania's French Creek, one of the last strongholds for two species of mussels, according to researchers.
Research connects big data marketing tools, land conservation
The same data used by digital marketers to sell products can also help inspire conservation behaviors, according to new research from the University of Montana.
HDAC inhibition may combat resistance to anti-PD-1 therapy in patients with melanoma
A combination of the experimental histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor entinostat with the anti-PD-1 therapeutic pembrolizumab (Keytruda) showed clinical responses in patients with melanoma that had progressed on prior anti-PD-1 treatment, according to results from the ENCORE 601 phase Ib/II clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Anti-evolvability drugs could slow antibiotic resistance in bacteria
In a study publishing April 1, 2019 in the journal Molecular Cell, researchers found that one mechanism by which antibiotics induce drug-resistance mutations in bacteria is by triggering the generation of high levels of toxic molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS).
Breakthrough study of cell signaling holds promise for immune research and beyond
For the first time ever, scientists have imaged the process by which an individual immune system molecule is switched on in response to a signal from the environment, leading to the critical discovery that the activation process involves hundreds of proteins suddenly coming together to form a linked network through a process known as a phase transition.
ACR targets step therapy and drug pricing in new position statements
The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has released new drug pricing and step therapy position statements that they hope legislators will consider as they continue to explore policy and regulatory options to make drugs more affordable and accessible.
Natural gene therapy for intractable skin disease discovered
Pathogenic gene mutations causing a type of intractable skin disease can be eliminated from some parts of patients' skin as they age, according to Hokkaido University researchers and their collaborators in Japan.
UM environmental engineering faculty publishes paper on risk assessment
The basis behind the newly published dose-response function is that the relationship between intra-cellular responses and multi-organ, multi-cellular governing processes is reflected in the overall dose-response function.
A bald gene find­ing
Hairlessness in dogs can be the result of deliberate breeding or, in certain breeds, a defect.
How to ice-proof the next generation of aircraft
To prevent ice formation on aircraft during flight, current systems utilize the heat generated by burning fuel, but these high-temperature, fuel-dependent systems cannot be used on the proposed all-electric, temperature-sensitive materials of next-generation aircraft.
Research brief: Largest study of childhood cancer after IVF
University of Minnesota researchers conducted the largest study of childhood cancer after conception by IVF to date.
Blocking platelets: A possible option to prevent fatty liver disease and liver cancer
Blood platelets which interact with liver cells and immune cells play a major role in the development of fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver inflammation and liver cancer, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg and from Zurich University and University Hospital have now shown in a publication.
Alcohol drinking slows brain growth in adolescent monkeys
Heavy drinking during the cusp of adulthood reduces the rate of brain growth in male and female rhesus monkeys, according to new research published in eNeuro.
Drugs used to enhance sexual experiences, especially in UK
Combining drugs with sex is common regardless of gender or sexual orientation, reveals new research by UCL and the Global Drug Survey into global trends of substance-linked sex.
How common are advanced care planning conversations with hospitalized, older patients?
A research team from Dartmouth College analyzed advanced care planning (ACP) billing at a national physician practice and found that despite incentives, the rate of ACP-billed conversations was low and varied greatly among physicians and practice sites.
Scientists confirm first report of egg parasitoid in Africa to fight fall armyworm
Scientists have confirmed the first report of an egg parasitoid Telenomus remus in Africa which could prove an important biological weapon in the fight against the devastating fall armyworm that threatens food security of more than 200 million people.
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2019
ORNL used artificial intelligence to analyze data from published medical studies about bullying to reveal the potential of broader impacts, such as mental illness or disease; New low-cost, printed, flexible sensor can wrap around power cables to precisely monitor electrical loads from household appliances; ORNL is evaluating paths for licensing remotely operated microreactors, which could provide clean energy to isolated regions; ORNL-led team used carbon nanotubes to improve process that removes salt from water.
Evidence for link between 'leaky gut' and autoantibody production in HIV-positive patients
Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report in Microbiome that autoantibody production in HIV-positive patients who have undergone antiretroviral therapy is linked to levels of Staphylococcus products in their blood.
Growth in telehealth from 2016 to 2017 outpaces other venues of care
From 2016 to 2017, private insurance claim lines for services rendered via telehealth as a percentage of all medical claim lines grew 53 percent nationally, more than any other venue of care studied for that variable in the second annual edition of FH Healthcare Indicators®.
Physics: Behavior of 'trapped' electrons in a one-dimensional world observed in the lab
University of Cologne physicists directly observe the separation of spin and charge as predicted by the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory for the first time.
New evidence about why clear margins in breast cancer surgery are such good news
When a breast cancer tumor is removed with no signs of cancer left behind, it's great news for patients, and now scientists have more evidence of why.
Study estimates how common carriers of polyglutamine disease-associated gene variants are in general population
Huntington disease is one of nine rare hereditary neurodegenerative diseases known as polyglutamine diseases.
Cleaning up oil using magnets
In the future, it could be possible to remove oil spills on the surface of the ocean by using magnets.
A cellular protein as a 'gas pump attendant' of cancer development
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have discovered a new mechanism of gene transcription in tumor cells.
Crop yield in maize influenced by unexpected gene 'moonlighting'
Researchers identified a relationship between crop yield in the maize plant and activity of the RAMOSA3 gene.
Special journal issue highlights shift work science, solutions
Shift work and non-standard work schedules provide clear economic benefits in a 24/7 society, but also come with issues related to insufficient sleep, misalignment of the biological clock, and other factors that influence the safety, health and well-being of workers.
HIV infection increases the risk of death associated with depressive symptoms
In a new study to investigate the relationship among depressive disorders or symptoms, HIV status and mortality, researchers report that symptoms of depression are moderately associated with death among veterans with HIV but not among those without HIV infection.
Natural climate processes overshadow recent human-induced Walker circulation trends
A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, shows that the recent intensification of the equatorial Pacific wind system, known as Walker Circulation, is unrelated to human influences and can be explained by natural processes.
Pitt research reveals how immune cells help tumors escape body's defenses
New findings from Pitt and UPMC Hillman Cancer Center researchers reveal how immune cells turn off killer T cells, pointing to new drug targets that can improve the success of cancer immunotherapy.
Umbralisib shows early promise for patients with marginal zone lymphoma
The investigational therapeutic umbralisib, which targets the molecule PI3K-delta, was well tolerated and highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory marginal zone lymphoma, according to early results from the UNITY-NHL phase II clinical trial, which were presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Tracking sludge flow for better wastewater treatment and more biogas
Study finds the flow behaviour of sewage sludge can be used as a tool to gauge how quickly organic matter is dissolving at high temperatures, paving the way for online monitoring
Research identifies potential target for group a streptococcus vaccine
With the specter of increased resistance to antibiotics, the scientific community is feeling pressure to find new ways to treat bacteria like Group A Streptococcus.
Global microbial signatures for colorectal cancer established
Researchers from EMBL, the University of Trento, and their international collaborators have analysed multiple existing microbiome association studies of colorectal cancer together with newly generated data.
Single agent umbralisib effective for relapsed slow-growing lymphoma
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed the investigational drug umbralisib as an effective treatment for patients with relapsed marginal zone lymphoma (MZL).
The inflammation connection
New biological findings point towards a new avenue for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs.
Russian scientists found out how a male-hating bacterium rejuvenates
A team from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University together with their Russian colleagues carried out genetic analysis of the symbiotic bacterium Wolbachia that prevents the birth and development of males in different species of arthropods.
More than one in 10 Canadians want to be in an open relationship
A sizeable number of Canadian adults are either in or would like to be in an open relationship, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.
Artificial intelligence sheds new light on cell developmental dynamics
What happens inside a cell when it is activated, changing, or responding to variations in its environment?
Women dominate ob/gyn field but make less money than male counterparts
While women outnumber men as ob/gyn practitioners, they still make significantly less money and the pay gap extends to subspecialties like reproductive endocrinology and infertility, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
New ebolavirus, found in bats, more widespread than thought
A University of Arkansas biologist found a newly discovered species of ebolavirus, named Bombali, in a bat caught in Kenya.
Same properties, lower cost
Japanese scientists have developed a technique to transform a copper-based substance into a material that mimics properties of precious and pricey metals, such as gold and silver.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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