Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 02, 2019


Maintenance therapy with rucaparib shows clinical responses in a subgroup of patient with pancreatic cancer
Maintenance treatment with the PARP inhibitor rucaparib (Rubraca) was well tolerated and provided clinical responses among patients with advanced BRCA- or PALB2-mutated pancreatic cancer sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy, according to results from an interim analysis of an ongoing phase II clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Nature versus nurture: Environment exerts greater influence on corn health than genetics
In one of the largest and most diverse leaf microbe studies to date, the team monitored the active bacteria on the leaves of 300 diverse lines of corn growing in a common environment.
The Transpolar Drift is faltering -- sea ice is now melting before it can leave the nursery
The dramatic loss of ice in the Arctic is influencing sea-ice transport across the Arctic Ocean.
Restore natural forests to meet global climate goals
International plans to restore forests to combat global warming are flawed and will fall far short of meeting 1.5C climate targets, according to new research by UCL and University of Edinburgh scientists.
Food for thought: Why did we ever start farming?
In UConn researcher Elic Weitzel's recent publication, he hopes to shed light on the question regarding the adaptation farming in early populations in the Eastern United States.
Low-bandwidth radar technology provides improved detection of objects
Tel Aviv University researchers have demonstrated a different type of ranging system for radar that possesses superior range resolution and is almost completely free of bandwidth limitations.
Turbulences theory closer high-energy physics than previously thought
A new research paper finds the high-energy physics concept of 'un-naturalness' may be applicable to the study of turbulence or that of strongly correlated systems of elementary particles.
Caring for an older adult with cancer comes with emotional challenges for caregivers, too
Until now, no large study has evaluated whether or not caring for older adults with advanced cancer is linked to caregivers' emotional health or to their quality of life.
New research shows 73 percent of allergists prescribe under-the-tongue allergy tablets
A new study shows that most American allergists now prescribe under-the-tongue allergy tablets for patients to treat certain allergies.
Mayo Clinic finds 3 factors extend life for advanced pancreatic cancer patients
Historically, most pancreatic cancer patients whose tumors grow outside the pancreas to encompass veins and arteries have been told the cancer is inoperable and they should prepare for an average survival time of 12 to 18 months.
Digital device overload linked to obesity risk
If your attention gets diverted in different directions by smartphones and other digital devices, take note: Media multitasking has now been linked to obesity.
Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons.
New study demonstrates radio signal benefits from decades-old theory
Engineering researchers have demonstrated that a longstanding theoretical method called direct antenna modulation has real-world utility for boosting the quality of radio signals when transmitting at high data rates.
Beware a glacier's tongue
Glaciers extending into freshwater lakes can form long, submerged terraces that menacingly rise above the surface when icy chunks fall into the water.
A slippery slope: How climate change is reshaping the Arctic landscape
Increasing ground temperatures in the Arctic are indicators of global climate change, but until recently, areas of cold permafrost were thought to be relatively immune to severe impacts.
Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles
New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex.
Wearable sensors mimic skin to help with wound healing process
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York, have developed skin-inspired electronics to conform to the skin, allowing for long-term, high-performance, real-time wound monitoring in users.
New alternatives may ease demand for scarce rare-earth permanent magnets
From computer hard discs to smart phones, magnets are at the forefront of technology.
Hybrid species could hold secret to protect Darwin's finches against invasive parasite
A hybrid bird species on the Galapagos Islands could help scientists find a way to stop an invasive fly which is killing off the hatchlings of famous Darwin's finches at an alarming rate, according to new research.
Tumor microenvironment analyzed to increase effectiveness of preclinical trials
It was shown that co-culturing HeLa adenocarcinoma cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells results in changes in the proliferative activity of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stromal cell populations.
Acute flaccid myelitis requires galvanized research response
Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) presents significant challenges not only to patients but also to researchers, and efforts must be accelerated to learn more about the condition, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, write in a new perspective published in mBio.
Gut microbiome directs the immune system to fight cancer
Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys have demonstrated a causal link between the gut microbiome and the immune system's ability to fight cancer.
AACR: Genetic study identifies a risk factor for stroke among cancer survivors
Research at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has identified a genomic risk factor associated with stroke in childhood cancer survivors.
Researchers tap rare pristine air to reveal pollution's impact
Human-caused pollution spurs the production of climate-changing particles known as secondary organic aerosols much more than previously thought.
Breast cancer study by UCR medical student could help patients live longer
A student at the University of California, Riverside, presented research results at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, or AACR, in Atlanta showing that surgery is associated with higher survival rates for patients with HER2-positive stage 4 breast cancer compared with those who did not undergo surgery.
Love Island: Flamboyant males get the girls on Madagascar
German scientists have discovered two new species of giant stick insect on Madagascar, whose males become dazzling blue or multicolored at sexual maturity.
Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages
The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures.
HKUST scientists discover how RNA PoII maintains accurate transcription with super computer
Scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology have recently uncovered the mechanisms of how RNA polymerase II performs intrinsic cleavage reaction to proofread RNA transcriptions, shedding light on how misregulation of accurate transcription can lead to diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease.
Muscle-like material expands and contracts in response to light (video)
Just as controlled-release medications slowly dole out their cargo after they experience a pH change in the body, implanted 'artificial muscles' could someday flex and relax in response to light illuminating the skin.
The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US
In recent years the US Department of Energy laid out an ambitious plan to grow the US offshore wind sector.
Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk
Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes.
Mosses -- Dynamic and built to last
New UConn research dives deep into the genetic history of mosses.
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, hypothyroidism could lower risk of T-zone lymphoma in dogs
Dogs that receive omega-3 fatty acid supplements or have hypothyroidism may be less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL).
Saffron comes from Attica -- origin of the saffron crocus traced back to Greece
Crocus sativus, a small plain purple flower with three bright red stigmas, not unlike the crocus flowers which seem omnipresent in springtime, only much more valuable.
Plentiful females keep male crickets young
Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.
Prebiotic chemistry: Stable majorities
How could prebiotic information-bearing DNA sequences survive in the face of competition from a vast excess of shorter molecules with random sequences?
Combine data to improve malaria tracking, say scientists
Scientists have identified a way to provide more detailed information on malaria transmission both locally and across borders, according to two new papers published today in eLife.
VLA makes first direct image of key feature of powerful radio galaxies
A dusty, doughnut-shaped feature long thought to be an essential part of the 'engines' at the cores of active galaxies is seen for the first time in one of the most powerful galaxies in the Universe.
Hands spread flame retardants, plasticizers throughout homes
Hundreds of everyday items, from furniture to cell phones to floor wax, contain organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers.
Defects enable RoHS-compliant, high-performance infrared photodetectors
A study led by ICFO researchers reports on a highly sensitive CMOS compatible broadband photodetector by tailoring material defects.
Three easy measures to predict metabolic syndrome in elderly
A new study found a surprisingly high rate of metabolic syndrome among individuals aged 60-100 years.
More children for the high educated: Broadband Internet creates a digital fertility divide
Access to broadband Internet has a positive effect on fertility, overall life satisfaction and time spent with children.
Searching for better treatments for irritated tendons
Researchers learn what makes tendons fray in old age, knowledge that could help develop better treatments for tendinosis and regrow damaged tissue.
Researchers establish global microbial signatures for colorectal cancer
Patients with colorectal cancer have the same consistent changes in the gut bacteria across continents, cultures, and diets -- a team of international researchers, from University of Copenhagen among others, find in a new study.
Bacterial factories could manufacture high-performance proteins for space missions
Nature has evolved protein-based substances with mechanical properties that rival even the best synthetic materials.
Prostate cancer incidence and mortality have declined in most countries
Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are decreasing or stabilizing in most parts of the world, with the United States recording the biggest drop in incidence, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Study reveals genes associated with heavy drinking and alcoholism
A large genomic study of nearly 275,000 people led by Penn Medicine researchers revealed new insights into genetic drivers of heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD), the uncontrollable pattern of alcohol use commonly referred to as alcoholism.
Is your melanoma hot enough for immunotherapy?
University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at AACR 2019 shows that tumors with mutations in genes leading to over-activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway were more than three times as likely to respond to anti-PD1 immunotherapy compared with tumors in which these changes were absent.
New study evaluates psychological interventions in post-conflict Pakistan
A new University of Liverpool led study, published in The Lancet, highlights the effectiveness of a brief group psychological intervention for women affected by anxiety and depression in a post-conflict setting in Pakistan.
Acetaminophen may increase stroke risk for those with diabetes
Surprisingly, we are only now coming to understand how acetaminophen works -- and recent research shows that we may need to develop a better understanding of the need for caution when using acetaminophen, especially when it comes to avoiding some of the risks associated with its use.
Study debunks 'depression genes' hypotheses
A new study assessing data from 620,000 individuals found that the 18 most highly-studied candidate genes for depression are no more associated with depression than randomly chosen genes.
New Bombali ebolavirus found in Kenyan bat
Researchers have identified Bombali ebolavirus in an Angolan free-tailed bat captured in the Taita Hills, southeast Kenya.
Older women benefit significantly when screened with 3D mammography
Mammography remains an effective method for breast cancer screening in women ages 65 and older, with the addition of a 3D technique called tomosynthesis improving screening performances even more, according to a new study.
New machine learning model describes dynamics of cell development
From their birth through to their death, cells lead an eventful existence.
Parasitology: Exotic signaling mechanism in pathogens
The unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness differs from other eukaryotes in the mode of regulation of an essential cellular signaling pathway.
'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction
Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate.
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
With nothing more than a photonic chip and an ordinary camera, EPFL researchers have managed to count biomolecules one by one in a small sample and determine their position.
App enables smallholder farmers to be community influencers and citizen scientists
Farmers are the first to take the brunt of the climate stress.
New species of wood-munching (and phallic-looking) clams found at the bottom of the ocean
Wood-boring clams are tiny clams that eat (and live in) sunken wood at the bottom of the ocean, and they have long, tube-shaped organs that they use to breathe called siphons sticking out of their shells.
Bath scientists develop a mouse model for rare brain disease Joubert syndrome
A new mouse model for Joubert syndrome has been developed by University of Bath scientists, who hope it will accelerate research to understand how the disease develops as well as help develop and evaluate therapeutic approaches.
A universal description of non-equilibrium colloid phase separation
A research team at The University of Tokyo simulated phase separation in colloidal suspensions.
Decades-old misconception on white blood cell trafficking to spleen corrected
Contrary to prior belief, the white blood cells enter the spleen primarily via vessels in the red pulp.
Intelligent metamaterials behave like electrostatic chameleons
Chinese physicists have developed so-called metashells made of smart, adaptable metamaterials.
3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a unique 3D-printed transparent skull implant for mice that provides an opportunity to watch activity of the entire brain surface in real time.
Adults at high risk for HIV infection have low rates of vaccination against HPV
Adults who are at high risk of becoming infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, were less likely than the general population to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause anal and cervical cancer, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, held in Atlanta March 29-April 3.
UMN researchers study effect of chronic opioid therapy on pain and survival in sickle cell disease
New UMN research recently published in Blood Advances, Kalpna Gupta, PhD, Professor of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, demonstrates the impact of opioids on the survival of humanized mouse models with sickle cell disease, compared to normal mice.
Sea snakes make record-setting deep dives
Sea snakes, best known from shallow tropical waters, have been recorded swimming at 250 meters in the deep-sea 'twilight zone,' smashing the previous diving record of 133 meters held by sea snakes.
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors.
Breakthrough alpha-ray treatment of cancer without external radiation
Radioactive iodine has been used for treatment of thyroid cancer.
Fast-changing genetics key to hospital superbug survival
A highly drug-resistant bacteria common in hospitals, Klebsiella pneumoniae, represents a significant antimicrobial resistance threat and should be monitored globally, say UCL researchers.
Which came first, the lizard or the egg?
In a world first, Sydney biologists have observed a three-toed skink lay eggs and give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy, opening a useful pathway to study the evolution of pregnancy.
'Molecular surgery' reshapes living tissue with electricity but no incisions
Traditional surgery to reshape a nose or ear entails cutting, sometimes followed by long recovery times and scars.
Scientists capture live, atomic-level detail of nanoparticle formation
Scientists at the Sensitive Instrument Facility of the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory achieved real-time atom rearrangement monitoring using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy during the synthesis of intermetallic nanoparticles (iNPs).
Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'
Description of genes involved in sugarcane root cell separation could lead to the development of varieties with softened cell walls similar to those of papaya, boosting the production of second-generation etanol.
Machine learning for measuring roots
A multidisciplinary team of plant biologists and engineers has developed a software that uses machine learning to measure plant root length accurately.
Liver, colon cancer cells thwarted by compounds derived from hops
The plant that adds flavor, color and bitterness to beer also produces a primary compound that thwarts cancer cells, and two important derivatives of the compound do as well.
Combo of virotherapy and radiotherapy shows early promise in patients with esophageal cancer
The experimental oncolytic adenovirus telomelysin (OBP-301) in combination with radiotherapy was safe and showed early clinical efficacy in vulnerable patients with esophageal cancer, according to results from a phase I clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Should I stay or should I go?
Researchers investigate the dispersal patterns of the endangered golden lion tamarin, to help maintain the viability of the species.
Brain imaging associated with change in management of patients with dementia, cognitive impairment
Amyloid (abnormal protein) plaques in the brain are a feature of Alzheimer disease and imaging the brain with positron emission tomography (PET) can detect them.
Gout treatment may help prevent obesity-related type 2 diabetes, suggests small NIH study
The drug colchicine, used to treat the arthritic condition gout, could potentially reduce complications accompanying metabolic syndrome, a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar and other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
Study identifies new approach to repairing damaged peripheral nervous system
A new understanding of cell migration may eventually help in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases -- and even allow children to 'get out of their wheelchairs and live an enhanced quality of life.'
New record on the growth of graphene single crystals
An exciting rapid growth of large graphene single crystal on liquid Cu with the rate up to 79 μm s-1 based on the liquid metal chemical vapor deposition strategy was released by Lei Fu et al. in Science China Materials.
Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits
Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops -- or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers.
Genetic variant linked to increased stroke risk in childhood cancer survivors treated with CRT
A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with increased risk for developing stroke in childhood survivors who received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for their primary cancer, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Optimizing proton beam therapy with mathematical models
Particle beam therapy, a form of radiotherapy that involves using beams of positively charged particles rather than X-rays, is becoming increasingly popular.
Blue light could treat superbug infections
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body, is often called a 'superbug' thanks to its ability to dodge many common antibiotics.
PARP inhibitors can shrink tumors in pancreatic cancer patients with specific mutations
Switching pancreatic cancer patients to the PARP inhibitor rucaparib as maintenance therapy may represent new treatment paradigm for pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutations.
Can delayed/extended-release methylphenidate allow for once daily evening dosing in ADHD?
A new three-part study showed that a delayed-release, extended-release form of methylphenidate could be given to adults in the evening with or without food and would not exert any clinically meaningful effect for at least 10 hours after administration.
New role for a driver of metastatic cancers
Metastatic ovarian, prostate and breast cancers are notoriously difficult to treat and often deadly.
The number of people affected by food crises remains at alarming levels
More than 113 million people across 53 countries experienced acute hunger requiring urgent food, nutrition and livelihoods assistance in 2018, according to a new report published today in Brussels.
New plastic films deflect or trap heat with zero energy required
Researchers have developed new plastic films that stay cool when exposed to sunlight and are very lightweight, strong and bendable.
Permian volcanism contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gas content in Antarctica
The Choiyoi magmatic Province, with an estimated volume of ~1.3 million square kilometers, represents a voluminous Permian subduction-related volcanic episode that has thus far been described only from South America.
New study identifies biomarkers to predict the risk of atrial fibrillation
Scientists at the University of Navarra link the alteration of three molecules with the prevalence, incidence, and recurrence of this cardiac ailment present in 33.5 million people in the world By analyzing a blood sample, they can offer a more precise personalized preventive treatment and follow-up.
Alzheimer's diagnosis, management improved by brain scans
A first-of-its-kind national study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer's-related 'plaques' significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia.
Does live tweeting while watching TV distract from the ads?
Researchers from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and at Goizueta Business School at Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which reveals that advertisers can see a boost in online shopping when television viewers multitask and engage in social media activity while watching certain programs.
Sun, moon and sea as part of a 'seismic probe'
Using a single seismometer, researchers have shown that seismic waves excited by the surf, together with the effect of the Earth's tides on the subsoil, can be used to better understand the properties of the Earth without having to drill into the ground.
Berkeley's soda tax election changed drinking habits months before prices went up
Berkeley's soda tax election may have played a major role in changing drinking habits in the city, a new study shows.
Research shows impact of poverty on children's brain activity
New research reveals the impact of poverty on children's brain activity.
High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides
Nature has provided us with lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics.
Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians.
Insects in freezing regions have a protein that acts like antifreeze
The power to align water molecules is usually held by ice, which affects nearby water and encourages it to join the ice layer.
Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds
Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.
Study identifies potential fix for hospital star rating program
Allowing for more quality measures in the federal government's Quality Star Rating program would create a fairer and more equitable model for assessing the level of quality at US acute-care hospitals, according to a Henry Ford Health System study.
Understanding stock market returns: Which models fits best?
A comparison of two models for stock market prediction shows clear differences in their accuracy, depending on the length of the forecasting period.
Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts
In 'Conspicuous Plumage Does Not Increase Predation Risk: A Continent-Wide Test Using Model Songbirds,' published in the American Naturalist, Kristal E.
Artificial intelligence helps to better assess treatment response of brain tumors
A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors.
Bariatric embolization shows promise in treatment of obesity
Bariatric embolization, a new, minimally invasive treatment for obesity produces weight loss and reduces appetite for up to one year, according to a new study.
Online romance is local, but not all locales are the same
Big data analysis of popular online dating website reveals that geographic distance within the US is the strongest driver of mutual romantic interest.
Team models cocaine trafficking response to counternarcotic efforts
A new computer model offers a much-needed, evidence-based tool to assess different cocaine interception scenarios and predict how drug smugglers react to attempts by authorities to intercept their narcotics.
Researchers tune material's color and thermal properties separately
MIT engineers have made samples of strong, tissue-like polymer material, the color and heat properties of which they can tailor independently of the other.
NJIT researchers detect minute levels of disease with a nanotechnology-enhanced biochip
The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms.
Defining obesity in children should be based on health issues, not just BMI
Details of the study called the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry (CANPWR).
Minimizing fuel explosions and fires from accidents and terrorist acts with polymers
When an act of terrorism or a vehicle or industrial accident ignites fuel, the resulting fire or explosion can be devastating.
Surgery associated with increased survival for patients with HER2+ stage 4 breast cancer
Surgery was associated with higher survival rates for patients with HER2-positive (HER2+) stage 4 breast cancer compared with those who did not undergo surgery, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3.
Loss of habitat causes double damage to species richness
Loss and fragmentation of habitat are among the main reasons why biodiversity is decreasing in many places worldwide.
Subaru Telescope helps find dark matter is not made up of tiny black holes
An international team has found evidence dark matter may not be made of tiny black holes.
Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression
Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, University of South Florida researchers report.
Teaching computers to intelligently design 'billions' of possible materials
At the University of Missouri, researchers in the College of Engineering are applying one of the first uses of deep learning -- the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles -- to the field of materials science.
No US commercial laboratories fully meet guidance for noninvasive prenatal screening
An analysis of the reports and materials provided by commercial laboratories offering noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic disorders finds that none of them fully meet the recommendations published by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.
Scientists measure extent of recovery for critically endangered black abalone
One critically endangered species of smooth-shelled abalone is making a comeback in certain parts of its range along the California coast.
Slight decline in hepatitis C diagnoses in Europe
European surveillance data show a 10% decrease in newly reported hepatitis C cases between 2016 and 2017.
UBC research recommends graduated return to work after prostatectomy
UBC research cautions men recovering from a radical prostatectomy to take it easy when returning to work.
Academic journal Polar Science features polar science in India
The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) published a special issue 'Recent advances in climate science of polar region (to commemorate the contributions of late Dr.
Wild bees flock to forested areas affected by severe fire
A groundbreaking two-year study in southern Oregon found greater abundance and diversity of wild bees in areas that experienced moderate and severe forest fires compared to areas with low-severity fires.
Global eradication of 'fly of death' not ethically justified, researchers conclude
Oregon State University researchers argue that human-caused extinction of the tsetse fly would be unethical, but elimination campaigns targeting isolated populations of the fly are ethically defensible.
New study identifies genetic variant that could help reduce need for liver transplants
A new study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research has identified a genetic variant associated with liver fibrosis (scarring) in chronic hepatitis C patients.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.