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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 04, 2019


Life on Mars?
Researchers from Hungary have discovered embedded organic material in a Martian meteorite found in the late 1970s.
Insulin insights
Insulin triggers genome-wide changes in gene expression via an unexpected mechanism.
See and be seen
Physicists at the University of Konstanz were able to show that the formation of stable groups requires only few skills: forward visual perception over large distances and regulation of the speed according to the number of perceived individuals.
Improving 3D-printed prosthetics and integrating electronic sensors
Virginia Tech professor and his team have made inroads in integrating electronic sensors with personalized 3D-printed prosthetics
Peptide keeps predatory nematodes from eating their kin
A small peptide produced in the skin of predatory nematodes prevents them from cannibalizing their immediate family members, while they feed upon their close relatives, a new study finds.
Researchers show that mutations in human livers can promote tissue regeneration
Researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern have identified genetic mutations that accumulate in the adult liver that can promote regeneration in the context of chronic liver damage.
Deep stimulation improves cognitive control by augmenting brain rhythms
Team's findings could provide neurosurgeons and psychiatrists with the reliable, objective and rapid feedback they've needed to properly fine-tune the placement and 'dosage' of DBS electrical stimulation when seeking to treat psychiatric disorders.
Vitamin B12 is identified as the inhibitor of a key enzyme in hereditary Parkinson's disease
Iban Ubarretxena, an Ikerbasque Researcher and Director of the Biofisika Institute (CSIC-UPV/EHU), participates in a piece of research that has enabled new inhibitors to be identified and which could be used to develop drugs to combat Parkinson's.
Stressed? Take a 20-minute nature pill
Taking at least 20 minutes out of your day to stroll or sit in a place that makes you feel in contact with nature will significantly lower your stress hormone levels.
University of Manchester technology set to lead fight against anti-microbial resistance
Professor Douglas Kell and colleagues have developed novel technology that identifies the most effective antibiotic to kill organisms in urinary tract infections.
Experimental therapy completely clears HPV in one-third of cervical cancer precursors
A potential new immune-based therapy to treat precancers in the cervix completely eliminated both the lesion and the underlying HPV infection in a third of women enrolled in a clinical trial.
Genome-wide analysis reveals new strategies to target pancreatic cancer
An international team of scientists led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine employed an array of next-generation sequencing and gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to map the molecular dependencies - and thus vulnerabilities -- of pancreatic cancer stem cells.
A 'million word gap' for children who aren't read to at home
Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to, a new study found.
Peptides with brominated tryptophan analogs could protect marine animals
Bromotryptophan is a nonstandard amino acid that is rarely incorporated in ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (ribosomal peptides).
Researchers uncover new cause of abdominal aortic aneurysm
Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall.
Defining the emotional bond forced onto teen victims of sex trafficking
Rutgers researchers have defined the relationship that forms between children who are sold for sex and the criminals who traffic them.
Visualization strategies may backfire on consumers pursuing health goals
Using visualization as motivation is a common technique for achieving goals, but consumers who are pursuing health goals such as eating healthy or losing weight should use caution when using perspective-based visualizations.
Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health
Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.
The decline of state-level IVC filter utilization
National inferior vena cava (IVC) filter utilization in the Medicare population has declined over the last decade according to a prior Harvey L.
Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea.
Gut microbiome may contribute to HIV transmission in high-risk men
Gut microbes from high HIV-risk men who have sex with men drive immune activation in mice and HIV infection in cells, according to a study published April 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Brent Palmer and Catherine Lozupone of the University of Colorado Anschutz, and colleagues.
Using a promiscuous inhibitor to uncover cancer drug targets
Scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a method that exploits the multitargeted nature of a chemical inhibitor to pinpoint vulnerabilities within cancer cells.
Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems
On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant.
Study: Protein key to charcot-marie-tooth, other nerve diseases
A new study provides critical insight into a little-known, yet relatively common, inherited neurological condition called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
Cancer exports molecular 'saboteurs' to remotely disarm immune system
Immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized cancer treatment: many patients with malignancies that until recently would have been considered untreatable are experiencing long-term remissions.
Detecting pollution with a compact laser source
Researchers at EPFL have developed a simple mid-infrared laser source that can be used to detect pollution in the air or molecules in someone's breath.
Super berries power up porridge
The antioxidant capacity of fruit can be significantly diminished by heat or oxidation during processing.
New expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies
A new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) finds that many Indigenous communities do not receive policing services that meet their safety and security needs, and the evidence suggests a relationship-based, community driven approach provides an opportunity to make meaningful and sustainable improvements.
To keep the creative juices flowing, employees should be receptive to criticism
Though most firms today embrace a culture of criticism, when supervisors and peers dispense negative feedback it can actually stunt the creative process, according to a new study co-authored by Yeun Joon Kim, a Ph.D. student at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.
Researchers find new genetic information behind urogenital track anomalies
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a new mouse model of congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and disease progression.
New PET imaging biomarker could better predict progression of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have discovered a way to better predict progression of Alzheimer's disease.
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.
That's 'sew' smart! Scientists invent threads to detect gases when woven into clothing
Scientists have developed a novel fabrication method to create dyed threads that change color when they detect a variety of gases.
Analysis identifies patients most at risk for weight regain after bariatric surgery
In the years following bariatric surgery, a person's overall eating behaviors and the amount of time spent watching television, playing video games and using a computer for recreation are a better indication of long-term weight loss success than specific weight control practices like counting calories.
How ALS progresses on genetic and cellular level revealed by high-res spinal cord study
Precise experiments have revealed for the first time how Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progresses on a genetic and cellular level.
Vision loss associated with longer hospital stays, more readmissions, greater costs
Researchers analyzed health care claims data for older adults (12,330 Medicare beneficiaries and 11,858 with commercial health insurance) to see if vision loss was associated with longer stays and higher readmission rates and costs when patients were hospitalized with common illnesses.
Robots to autocomplete Soldier tasks, new study suggests
Smart phones autocorrect in texting, search engines autocomplete queries, and mapping applications redirect navigation in real-time to avoid slowed traffic.
About TFE: Old and new findings
The fluorinated alcohol 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE) has been implemented for many decades now in conformational studies of proteins and peptides.
What and where in the processing of body-part information
Our brain tells us where parts of the body are in space.
Magnetic nanoparticles can 'burn' cancer cells
Among emerging cancer therapies, one approach is based on hyperthermia.
Unlocking the female bias in lupus
The majority of lupus patients are female, and new findings from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on why.
Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities
Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research published in Lancet Infectious Diseases.
The Lancet: Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke, study shows
Studies of East Asian genes that strongly affect how much alcohol people choose to drink show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet.
Associating colors with vowels? Almost all of us do!
Does [a:] as in baa sound more green or more red?
Research unlocks biomechanical mystery behind deadly blood clots
Researchers at the University of Sydney have used biomechanical engineering techniques to unlock the mystery surrounding the mechanical forces that influence blood clotting.
Scientists genetically engineer yeast to improve understanding of how cells work
Academics from the University of Cambridge and Imperial College London have genetically modified yeast cells to help scientists control how they react to their environment in a more desirable way.
Survey provides snapshot of global ECMO transport services
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-sustaining therapy for patients with respiratory or circulatory failure that is best performed at high-volume centers with special expertise.
Federal subsidies for US commercial fisheries should be rejected
A pending rule change proposed by the US National Marine Fisheries Service would allow the use of public funds to underwrite low-interest loans for the construction of new commercial fishing vessels.
Experts call for strategies to address public health crisis of opioid, ID epidemics
Citing the spread of infections linked to rising rates of opioid use across the country including HIV, viral hepatitis, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections and endocarditis, an article published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases calls on the federal government to support coordinated and strengthened responses by infectious diseases and substance use specialists.
Post-wildfire step-pool streams
Steps and pools are among the most stable and functionally important features in the mountain river landscape.
Researchers have invented a quieter airplane toilet
Airplane toilets are loud. For some, they are downright terrifying.
New ALS gene expression atlas offers unprecedented detail into disease progression
ALS researchers at the New York Genome Center have utilized new technologies for mapping gene expression in spinal cord samples that provide new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to disease onset and progression in ALS patients.
Health claims on packaging for many foods marketed to UK kids are 'confusing'
The health claims made on the product packaging for a large proportion of foods marketed to children in the UK are 'confusing,' and could be contributing to rising rates of childhood obesity, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
First reported UK case of likely dog-to-dog transmission of leishmaniosis
Veterinary professionals have sounded the alarm in this week's Vet Record after treating the first UK case of a dog with the potentially fatal infection, leishmaniosis, that is thought to have been passed on by another dog, rather than by travel to an area where the infection is endemic.
Tokyo Tech scientists discover deep microbes' key contribution to Earth's carbon cycle
Hydrocarbons play key roles in atmospheric and biogeochemistry, the energy economy, and climate change.
Parkinson's clues seen in tiny fish could aid quest for treatments
Parkinson's patients could be helped by fresh insights gained from studies of tiny tropical fish.
Bacterial nanowire mystery solved
Deep in the ocean or underground, where there is no oxygen, Geobacter bacteria 'breathe' by projecting tiny protein filaments called 'nanowires' into the soil, to dispose of excess electrons resulting from the conversion of nutrients to energy.
Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds
In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress.
Australian Murray River habitat restoration increases native fish populations
Dubbed the 'honeypot effect' -- a team of scientists from around Australia have shown that providing woody habitat, or 'snags,' for native fish in the Murray River increases their population size.
Scientists shed light on preservation mystery of Terracotta Army weapons
The chrome plating on the Terracotta Army bronze weapons -- once thought to be the earliest form of anti-rust technology -- derives from a decorative varnish rather than a preservation technique, finds a new study co-led by UCL and Terracotta Army Museum researchers.
Researchers create molecules with strong anti-Zika virus potential
Scientists have created a molecule with both strong anti-Zika properties and low toxicity to animal cells.
Severe psychological distress and daily cannabis use: Implications for mental health?
Daily cannabis use increased significantly from 2008 to 2016 among those with and without past-month serious psychological distress (SPD) and use among those with SPD was persistently higher compared to those without SPD.
Climate panel disbanded by Trump, now regrouped, releases its report
A federal advisory committee started meeting in 2016 to explore how to make the National Climate Assessment more usable for communities who want to take action.
Photons trained for optical fibre obstacle course will deliver stronger cyber security
Researchers from the NUS-Singtel Cyber Security Research & Development Laboratory demonstrate a way to improve quantum key distribution over fiber networks.
Defining the responsibility to recontact research participants with new genetic findings
ASHG, along with several co-signing organizations, issued a position statement today outlining whether, and to what extent, there is a responsibility to recontact genetic and genomic research participants when new findings emerge that suggest their genetic information should be interpreted differently, which would allow participants to benefit from current genomics advances.
How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying.
Plants grow less in hotter temperatures
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, pause the cell cycle when cells experience stress.
The chemistry behind color-changing birds (video)
There are thousands of species of birds here on Earth and with those great numbers come great biodiversity!
Compound that kills drug-resistant fungi is isolated from ant microbiota
A project conducted by researchers in Brazil and the US investigated bacteria living in symbiosis with insects as a source for novel drugs.
Catalyst research for solar fuels: Amorphous molybdenum sulfide works best
Efficient and inexpensive catalysts will be required for production of hydrogen from sunlight.
HZB contributions to special edition on ultrafast dynamics with X-ray methods
In the new special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, internationally renowned experts report on new developments in X-ray sources and ultrafast time-resolved experiments.
Ready, steady, go: 2 new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation
Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed -- and then activated -- to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens.
Mitochondrial permeability plays a key role in aging, recovery from ischemic injury
The ability of molecules to pass through the membrane of mitochondria -- the cellular structures that convert nutrients into energy -- may determine whether or not autophagy, a cellular process that removes damaged and dysfunctional molecules and cellular components, is beneficial or detrimental to the health of an organism.
Interparental aggression often co-occurs with aggression toward kids
Parents in the midst of a psychologically or physically aggressive argument tend to also be aggressive with their children, according to researchers at Penn State.
Scientists discover a small, dense planet orbiting a white dwarf
A new study reports discovery of one of the first small, intact planetary bodies orbiting a white dwarf star, a finding that sheds light into the twilight years of planetary systems.
Scientists call for national science agenda for biodiversity collections
The Biodiversity Collections Network (BCoN) has developed a national agenda that leverages digital data in biodiversity collections for new uses.
Radiation oncology workforce study indicates potential threat to rural cancer care access
The newest study of America's radiation oncology workforce finds that gender and race gaps have narrowed slightly, although persistent and growing geographic disparities point to a need for more equity in access to radiation therapy care.
Ancient, four-legged whale with otter-like features found along the coast of Peru
Cetaceans, the group including whales and dolphins, originated in south Asia more than 50 million years ago from a small, four-legged, hoofed ancestor.
New guidelines push for better controlled experiments with synthetic nucleic acids
Researchers have proposed new guidelines to overcome current problems facing scientists developing synthetic nucleic acids -- such as antisense oligonucleotides and double-stranded RNAs -- as drugs and research tools.
Opitz C Syndrome: New advances to improve the genetic diagnose of an ultra-rare disease
Opitz C syndrome (OCS), an ultra-rare disease that causes serious physical and intellectual disabilities, has an heterogeneous genetic base that makes its medical diagnostic and therapeutic intervention difficult.
Researchers engineer a cost-effective treatment for neglected tropical disease
Researchers have turned a fungus into a disease-curing factory through modern genetic engineering and patience.
Poverty leaves a mark on our genes
In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome.
Psychedelic drug MDMA may reawaken 'critical period' in brain to help treat PTSD
Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have found that the psychedelic drug MDMA reopens a kind of window, called a 'critical period,' when the brain is sensitive to learning the reward value of social behaviors.
Noncoding DNA drives the convergent loss of flight in flightless birds
Tucked away in the noncoding regions of bird DNA, researchers have discovered molecular roots of the loss of flight seen in so many disparate paleognathous birds.
Heavy metal planet fragment survives destruction from dead star
A fragment of a planet that has survived the death of its star has been discovered by University of Warwick astronomers in a disc of debris formed from destroyed planets, which the star ultimately consumes.
Seed dispersal by invasive birds in Hawaii fills critical ecosystem gap
On the Hawaiian island of O'ahu, where native birds have nearly been replaced by invasive ones, local plants depend almost entirely on invasive birds to disperse their seeds, new research shows.
Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study
Scientists at the University of Notre Dame discovered microglia actually squeeze through the spinal boundary, crossing into the peripheral nervous system in response to injury.
Standardizing last names and addresses leads to better patient record matching
Patient matching is crucial for patient safety and care. First of it's kind research from the Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University and Pew Charitable Trusts has found that standardizing last names and address information can improve linking of patient health records by as much as 8 percent -- more than 2 billion records -- and enhance data available to clinicians to inform their care decisions.
Children should help choose the charities their schools and families support
Children as young as four should be given more autonomy to help choose the charities their schools and families support, according to new research from the University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University.
Tweeting while viewing doesn't diminish TV advertising's reach and often leads to shopping
People watching 'social shows' like 'Dancing with the Stars' or 'The Bachelor' on television and simultaneously sharing their views on Twitter are more likely to be committed to the program and shop online, according to new research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
No such thing as 'sugar rush'! Sugar worsens mood rather than improving it
Sugar does not improve mood and it can make people less alert and more tired after its consumption -- according to a new study by the University of Warwick, Humboldt University of Berlin, and Lancaster University.
Cytomegaloviruses deploy a novel stealth strategy to subvert immune surveillance
Owl monkey cytomegalovirus produces a decoy molecule A43 to evade detection and destruction by immune cells in their hosts, according to a study published April 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Ana Angulo of the University of Barcelona, and colleagues.
SwRI engineers develop novel techniques to trick object detection systems
New adversarial techniques developed by engineers at Southwest Research Institute can make objects 'invisible' to image detection systems that use deep-learning algorithms.
Electricity-conducting bacteria yield secret to tiny batteries, big medical advances
These strange bacteria conduct electricity via a structure never before seen in nature -- a structure scientists can co-opt to miniaturize electronics, create powerful-yet-tiny batteries, build pacemakers without wires and develop a host of other medical advances.
Multiple mechanisms behind disease associated with unexpected heart attacks
An examination of three mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy -- a disease best known for revealing itself as an unexpected, fatal heart attack during strenuous exercise -- found separate mechanisms at work at the molecular level.
Durability vs. recyclability: Dueling goals in making electronics more sustainable
Research released by a team at Georgia Institute of Technology, where researchers looked into the impact of government policies put in place to reduce the amount of electronics waste filling up landfills.
Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations
Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study published in Seismological Research Letters.
Children requiring thyroid surgery have better outcomes at high-volume surgery centers
New research recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery found that post-operative success rates of pediatric thyroid patients, particularly children who require a thyroidectomy, correlate with the institution's patient volume.
New hope for treating childhood brain cancer
Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer.
Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster -- but it comes at a cost
New research from the Natural History Museum in Oslo suggests that bird sperm cells with a spiral or screw-like shape swim faster than straighter sperm -- but that the spiral shape also makes them more fragile.
The holm oak transcriptome is rebuilt, a key step towards understanding its biology
This research is a starting point in order to comprehend how this tree behaves during situations of stress at a molecular level.
Artificial intelligence approach optimizes embryo selection for IVF
The team, consisting of embryologists, reproductive medicine clinicians, computer scientists, and precision medicine experts, trained an artificial intelligence algorithm to discriminate between poor and good embryo quality.
And the blobs just keep on coming
Scientists re-inspected 45-year-old Helios data, finding long trains of massive blobs -- like lava lamp's otherworldly bubbles, but 50 to 500 times the size of Earth -- that ooze from the sun every 90 minutes or so.
One in every 12 Canadian with migraines has attempted suicide
A new study by the University of Toronto, published online this week in the journal Archives of Suicide Research, found that adults with migraine who had been sexually abused during childhood were three times more likely to have attempted suicide.
Blocking epigenetic Swiss army knife may be a new strategy for treating colorectal cancer
A new study out today in Cancer Cell shows that blocking specific regions of a protein called UHRF1 switches on hundreds of cancer-fighting genes, impairing colorectal cancer cells' ability to grow and spread throughout the body.
Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center used a new imaging technique to reveal a takeover strategy that has worked for weedy rice over and over again: roots that minimize below-ground contact with other plants.
Supporting HIV-affected couples trying to conceive
Timed vaginal insemination is a safe, effective way to help HIV-affected couples conceive, finds a new pilot study in Kenya led by a Michigan Medicine researcher.
Researchers determine how a major tumor suppressor pathway becomes deactivated
The Hippo pathway is an important biological tumor suppressor program that controls cell growth and organ size in humans.
Capturing mosquito waste could speed up virus detection
Public health officials could soon be able to detect viruses in mosquitoes in the wild much more quickly and easily -- thanks to the insect equivalent of a urine test.
Telerehabilitation benefits patients with late-stage cancers
Recent research led by Andrea Cheville, M.D., a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation physician, suggests that remotely delivering rehabilitation services to patients with late-stage cancer improves their physical function, pain and quality of life while allowing them to spend less time in hospitals and nursing homes.
UCF researchers develop way to control speed of light, send it backward
University of Central Florida researchers have developed a way to control the speed of light.
Think female race car drivers aren't fit enough? Think again
In the world of racing, the debate on whether women are as fit as men behind the wheel can often become heated.
Can human breast milk reduce intestinal injury following bone marrow transplant?
A new pilot study compared the use of human breast milk to formula in children less than five years of age who underwent bone marrow transplant, measuring the levels of inflammatory and pro-inflammatory biomarkers in the stool and blood to assess inflammatory injury to the intestinal microbiome.
Compass orientation of a migratory bat species depends on sunset direction
A team of scientists led by the Leibniz-IZW in Berlin combined a mirror experiment simulating a different direction of the setting sun and a new test procedure to measure orientation behavior in bats to understand the role of the sun's position in the animals' navigation system.
Australian research uncovers link between dietary fiber and lung disease
Dietary fiber may be a new tool in the prevention of progressive lung disease, thanks to the production of anti-inflammatory short chain fatty acids (SCFA), according to a new study by Australia's Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs at University of Newcastle, and the Centre for Inflammation, a partnership between the University of Technology Sydney and Centenary Institute.
Black nanoparticles slow the growth of tumors
The dark skin pigment melanin protects us from the sun's damaging rays by absorbing light energy and converting it to heat.
Cell lesson: better coordinated than isolated
A new study led by Juana Díez, principal investigator of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF, has found a new system in our cells that makes them more robust against possible alterations in the expression of our genes.
Study: Impact of concussions reduced in children with more years of sport experience
Research from York University's Faculty of Health found that children who have played in a performance sport for at least seven years, and have a history of concussion, recover better from concussions than children who have fewer years in the sport.
Going with the flow: How fecal bacteria spread in streams
Little research has been conducted into the spread and distribution of fecal bacteria in rivers and, above all, into their input from the surrounding landscape.
Research improves understanding of new form of cell-cell communication
Scientists have improved their understanding of a new form of cell-cell communication that is based on extracellular RNA (exRNA) by developing the exRNA Atlas resource, the first detailed catalog of human exRNAs in bodily fluids.
Sea turtles struggle years after unexplained die-off
New research is detailing how environmental stressors, including heavy metals, brought on by human activity are harming coastal green sea turtle populations -- work that researchers hope will inform conservation efforts going forward.
Spin lasers facilitate rapid data transfer
Engineers have developed a novel concept for rapid data transfer via optical fibre cables.
Liquid jets break up more readily on a substrate
In a new EPJ E paper, Andrew Dziedzic at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, New Jersey, USA, and colleagues, use computer simulations to study the way liquid filaments break up into smaller droplets.
New discovery provides key to side effects caused by erectile dysfunction drugs
Study reveals several features of PDE6 that were previously unseen.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.