Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 05, 2019


Parental behaviour affects the involvement of children in cyberbullying
The information analysed by this group of researchers came to another conclusion: when parenting practices are not very suitable, it seems that the probability increases that the children might be victimised or involved in the double role of aggressor/victim, while in the case of girls, when they are treated in this way, they tend to be cyber-aggressors.
High-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy well-tolerated by patients with centrally located lung tumors
Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a high-dose, precisely delivered radiotherapy, is considered the standard treatment for patients with medically inoperable, node-negative, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Racial disparities continue for black women seeking heart health care
Postmenopausal black women with heart attack or coronary heart disease experienced significantly lower treatment rates than Hispanic or white women.
SUTD uncovers the power of dynamically rewiring swarm robotic systems
Studies on the collective behavior of a swarm of land robots showed that a specific number of interactions among units is required to produce an optimal collective response.
Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes
Trying to find ancient DNA, let alone prove that the ancient DNA is ancestral to a population living today, is extremely challenging.
Getting to the bottom of the 'boiling crisis'
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere review how a 'boiling crisis' can occur in environments such as nuclear power plants.
Dentists underdiagnose when faced with time pressure, research shows
Dentists can miss important details on X-rays when put under time pressure, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.
U of G study reveals why heart failure patients suffer depression, impaired thinking
A new study by University of Guelph researchers explains why heart failure patients often have trouble with thinking and depression, pointing to ways to prevent and treat both heart and brain maladies through the emerging field of circadian medicine.
Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene
In a collaboration between the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Northeastern University, scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or 'islands' sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene.
How good are protein disorder prediction programs actually?
Until now it was difficult to answer this question, as a good benchmark for testing these bioinformatics programs was lacking.
Study measures gluten in gluten-free labeled restaurant food
Even tiny amounts of gluten in foods are troublesome for people with celiac disease, and restaurants may be the hardest places to avoid the protein, finds a Columbia study.
Unjamming the genome after DNA damage
A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.
Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved
EPFL scientists reveal the origin of apparently high and even negative capacitance values observed in perovskite solar cells.
Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape
Many resources encourage homeowners and land care managers to create bee-friendly environments, but most of them include lists of recommended plants rarely backed by science.
Anti-inflammatory drugs ineffective for prevention of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have known for decades that inflammation accompanies Alzheimer's disease brain lesions.
Screen time -- even before bed -- has little impact on teen well-being
Data from more than 17,000 teenagers show little evidence of a relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents.
New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special
This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute.
The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon
As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding.
Study calculates costs associated with smoking by patients with cancer
A study released today in JAMA Network Open reported that smoking after a cancer diagnosis is associated with substantial additional costs of cancer treatment.
Research identifies genetic causes of poor sleep
The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration.
TTI heat map shows relationship between traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma
TTI has created a heat map showing the relationship between traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma.
Warnings up in Western Australia as Suomi NPP satellite views Tropical Cyclone 23S
Tropical Cyclone 23S has developed north of the Kimberley coast, and generated warnings.
What are the costs of continued smoking among patients with cancer?
This study was an economic evaluation and it used a model to examine the costs of subsequent cancer treatment associated with continued smoking by patients after their initial cancer treatment failed.
New trauma care pathway reduces delirium and likelihood of returning to the hospital
A standardized interdisciplinary clinical pathway to identify and manage frailty in older patients has reduced the rate of one of the most debilitating complications for older patients -- delirium -- and kept patients from returning to the hospital within 30 days of treatment for traumatic injury.
Researchers discover CP violation in charm meson decays
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex, as part of the LHCb collaboration at CERN, have been the first to discover CP violation in charm meson decays.
Reflective roofs can reduce overheating in cities and save lives during heatwaves
A new modeling study from the University of Oxford and collaborators has estimated how changing the reflectivity of roofs can help keep cities cooler during heatwaves and reduce heat-rated mortality rates.
Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds
New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species.
Autism brings qualities which help at home and at work, study shows
Autism enhances characteristics such as loyalty and focus which help those with the condition at work and in their relationships with others, experts have found.
Older adults with blood cancers: How they fare
Recently, a team of researchers examined older adults who have cancer to see whether their ability to manage daily activities was linked to staying alive longer.
Changes in gun purchases after mass shootings
For this analysis, researchers examined monthly data on US background checks for gun purchases and permits from November 1998 through April 2016, and they looked for purchasing trends after mass shootings during that time.
Moffitt researchers develop tool to estimate genetic diversity and ancestry of cell lines
It is important that scientists have proper tools and model systems to study how these variations affect cancer development and devise effective therapies for patients of all genetic backgrounds.
When robots commit wrongdoing, people may incorrectly assign the blame
Last year, a self-driven car struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz.
Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition.
Fewer people died from heart disease in states that expanded Medicaid coverage through the Affordable Care Act
Counties in states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act had fewer deaths annually from heart disease compared to areas that did not expand Medicaid, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2019.
Like old photographs, memories fade over time
Past events are often vividly recollected. However, it remains unclear how the qualities of memories are reconstructed.
Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks
A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer.
Prototype in precision
A finger print can serve as identification to access locked doors and more, but current scanners can be duped with fake or even similar fingerprints.
Eyes reveal early Alzheimer's disease
Reduced blood capillaries in the back of the eye may be a new, noninvasive way to diagnose early cognitive impairment, the precursor to Alzheimer's disease in which individuals become forgetful, reports a new study.
Rainforest conservation in Peru must become more effective
A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest.
Unexpected rain on sun links two solar mysteries
Researchers find rain on the sun in an unexpected place.
Most links between personality traits and life outcomes are replicable
Studies showing links between personality traits and life outcomes, such as marital stability and vocational achievements, provide a reasonably accurate map of the relationship between personality and various aspects of one's life, according to findings from a large-scale replication project.
Immune cells key to predicting cancer outcomes, research suggests
Scientists have identified key changes in immune cells within cancerous tumors that could help improve the development of treatments.
Sah: Medical guidelines may be biased, overly aggressive
Dr. Sunita Sah practiced general medicine for several years in the United Kingdom's National Health Service.
Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy
Marie Kondo herself couldn't do it any better. Now researchers at Washington University in St.
Mutation stands in the way of healthy blood cell maturation
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and EMBL in Heidelberg have learned how a specific genetic mutation affects the maturation of blood cells in mouse models.
Large Antarctic Ice Shelf, home to a UK research station, is about to break apart
Glaciology experts have issued evidence that a large section of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station, is about break off.
What the Finnish concept of sisu can offer the world
The first study dedicated to sisu looks at more than 1,000 responses on what the concept means -- as well as whether it is inherently a good thing.
Study finds screen time -- even before bed -- has little impact on teen well-being
Research by Oxford University academics has found little evidence of a relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents.
Synthetic antibody rapidly protects mice and monkeys from Zika
A DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates, researchers report April 5 in the journal Molecular Therapy.
Tailoring lactation education to the cultural needs of orthodox Jewish families
In a new article published in The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, nurse researchers examine Orthodox Jewish practices related to the provision of human milk and breastfeeding for a sick newborn.
Radiation and plants: From soil remediation to interplanetary flights
Currently, the study of the effects of ionizing radiation is of great relevance in the context of the challenges in the field of agriculture development, the existence of zones with an elevated natural and man-made radiation background, and the need to develop space biology.
Rocket fuel that's cleaner, safer and still full of energy
Research published this week in Science Advances shows that it may be possible to create rocket fuel that is much cleaner and safer than the hypergolic fuels that are commonly used today.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...