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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 06, 2019


Preeclampsia treatment for mothers also benefits offspring
An estimated six to 15 million people in the US are children born of a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia.
Patients resistant to breast cancer therapy show epigenetic differences
According to a new study, breast cancer patients who don't respond to targeted therapy have different patterns of epigenetic modifications than patients who do respond.
Few people with heart failure take guideline-recommended drug, especially if not started while hospitalized
Heart failure patients who could possibly benefit from a newer class of drug to lower their heart rate were more likely to take the medication if it was prescribed before hospital discharge rather than in a follow-up doctor's visit, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Quailty of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2019.
Heart attack victims over 65 treated differently; suffer worse outcomes but have lower hospital charges, new research finds
Heart attack victims over age 65 are less likely than younger patients to receive timely percutaneous coronary intervention to open their blocked heart arteries, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Quailty of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2019.
New hope for preventing dangerous diabetes complication
People with diabetes who use insulin to control their blood sugar can experience a dangerous condition called hypoglycemia when blood sugar levels fall too low.
Socioeconomic status associated with likelihood of receiving a heart pump
Racial/ethnic minorities, patients who are uninsured or only have Medicaid insurance and those living in low-income ZIP codes were less likely to receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD).
Fresh guidance to fill 'information vacuum' on new cannabis products for medicinal use
A BMJ clinical review, published Saturday 6 April in advance of expected NICE guidelines in the UK, offers new advice to help patients and doctors.
New insights on the form and function of the dolphin clitoris
For the first time, researchers offer an up-close look at the clitoris of female dolphins along with insights on the potential for the animals to experience sexual pleasure.
Spicy compound from chili peppers slows lung cancer progression
Findings from a new study show that the compound responsible for chili peppers' heat could help slow the spread of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women.
Scientists find new therapy target for drug-induced liver failure
Acetaminophen -- a commonly used pain reliever and fever reducer -- is the leading cause of quickly developing, or acute, liver failure in the U.S.
New insights into how fatty liver disease progresses to cancer
The buildup of fat in the liver known as fatty liver disease sometimes leads to hard-to-treat liver cancer.

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