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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 07, 2019


Sunscreen use could lead to better blood vessel health
A new study suggests that sunscreen protects the skin's blood vessel function from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure by protecting dilation of the blood vessels.
Blocking opioid receptors could reduce hormone-therapy-fueled increases in sugar intake
Estradiol is a commonly prescribed estrogen therapy. Previous research has found that rats treated with the hormone experience an increase in sugar consumption.
Exercise during pregnancy protects offspring from obesity
A new study found that offspring born to mice that exercised during pregnancy were less likely to gain weight after consuming a high-fat diet later in life.
Real cost of heart attacks and strokes: Double the direct medical expense
The full financial cost of a heart attack or stroke is twice as much as the medical costs when lost work time for patients and caregivers is included.
Food additive may influence how well flu vaccines work
Michigan State University scientists have linked a common food preservative to an altered immune response that possibly hinders flu vaccines.
Device-guided breathing lowers heart rate, sympathetic activity in people with PTSD
Device-guided breathing may improve physiological symptoms in people with severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study.
Common food additive may weaken defenses against influenza
Research conducted in mice suggests the food additive tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) -- found in many common products from frozen meat to crackers and fried foods -- suppresses the immune response the body mounts when fighting the flu.
Experimental drug shows promise for opioid withdrawal symptoms
While medicines are available to relieve withdrawal symptoms in people recovering from opioid addiction, they cause side effects and can maintain the brain changes that led to addiction in the first place, which can lead to relapse before treatment is completed.
Common virus linked to faster disease progression in cystic fibrosis
A new study has found that cystic fibrosis patients who have a common virus may experience faster disease progression than patients who do not have the virus.
Air temperatures in the Arctic are driving system change
A new paper shows that air temperature is the 'smoking gun' behind climate change in the Arctic.
Gum bacteria implicated in Alzheimer's and other diseases
Researchers are reporting new findings on how bacteria involved in gum disease can travel throughout the body, exuding toxins connected with Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and aspiration pneumonia.
Spying on cells eating habits could aid cancer diagnosis
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have developed a new imaging technology to visualize what cells eat, which could aid the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer.
First national estimates of virginity in Japan: 1 in 10 adults in their 30s remains a virgin
Japan has an increasing percentage of young adults with no history of heterosexual vaginal intercourse.
NASA researchers catalogue all microbes and fungi on the International Space Station
A comprehensive catalogue of the bacteria and fungi found on surfaces inside the International Space Station (ISS) is being presented in a study published in the open-access journal Microbiome.
Global atlas of kidney health release on April 12 at World Congress of Nephrology
A global study of the burden of kidney disease will be released at the World Congress of Nephrology on Friday, April 12.
Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research
Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan.
Identifying a key player in gut defense development
Scientists have identified a protein critical to the immune system development and antibody production in mice, which could contribute to understanding the gut defense mechanism in infants.

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