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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 08, 2019


Increasing numbers of adults with lower education are dying from liver cancer
A new study published in CANCER reveals that rising rates of liver cancer deaths in the United States have largely been confined to individuals who have received less education, especially among men.
Too much of a good thing? High doses of vitamin D can lead to kidney failure
A case study in CMAJ highlights the dangers of taking too much vitamin D.
Official stats mask shark and ray species caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas
A new study reveals that 97 per cent of the sharks and rays caught and brought to market domestically by fleets from the European, North African and Middle Eastern countries that surround the Mediterranean and Black seas are not reported by species.
Novel tool gauges rural, older adults' knowledge of Alzheimer's
Nursing researchers have developed a novel tool called the ''Basic Knowledge of Alzheimer's Disease,'' to measure and assess Alzheimer's knowledge in rural and underserved communities, in a way that matches their socioeconomic, educational and cultural needs.
Researchers remove harmful hormones from Las Vegas wastewater using green algae
A common species of freshwater green algae is capable of removing certain endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from wastewater, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Las Vegas.
When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals
Climate change is increasing the likelihood of extreme winter rain events in the Arctic.
Psychiatry: Multigene test predicts depression risk
An international team led by Munich-based researchers has found a genetic score that reliably predicts the risk, severity and age of onset of depression in young people.
Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning.
'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction
Scientists studying plant cell walls have discovered details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component.
Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems?
Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice.
Healthy diet helps older men maintain physical function
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examines the role of a healthy diet and finds that this highly modifiable factor can have a large influence on maintaining physical function, lowering the likelihood of developing physical impairment by approximately 25 percent.
Text messages show promise as next step for improving heart health in China
Motivational text messages are a well-liked, feasible new way to provide additional support to Chinese patients with heart disease, reports a preliminary study by researchers at Yale and in China.
Neurodevelopment of 2-month-old infants shows effect of maternal stress
A study of 70 mothers and their infants suggests that the impact of maternal stress on neurodevelopment is detectable by electroencephalography (EEG) at 2 months of age.
People under 40 diagnosed with type 2 diabetes face excess risk of cardiovascular disease, death
People under age 40 diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are more likely to have or die from cardiovascular disease than people of a similar age who do not have type 2 diabetes.
Scientists compared ways of drug delivery to malignant tumors
A team of biologists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University and Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod) analyzed available methods of targeted drug delivery to malignant tumors.
Study shows dogs can accurately sniff out cancer in blood
Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans', making them highly sensitive to odors we can't perceive.
Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth
Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers.
Study of multiple sclerosis patients shows 18 percent misdiagnosed
A recent study found that nearly 18 percent of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis before being referred to two major Los Angeles medical centers for treatment actually had been misdiagnosed with the autoimmune disease.
Current methods may inadequately measure health impacts from oil, natural gas extraction
Measurements of hazardous air pollutant concentrations near oil and natural gas extraction sites have generally failed to capture levels above standard health benchmarks; yet, the majority of studies continue to find poor health outcomes increasing as distance from these operations decreases.
Off-the-shelf smart fabric helps athletic coaching and physical therapy
A welcome advancement to enhance performance and rehabilitation as baseball season heats up.
Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives
The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator.
Childhood trauma has lasting effect on brain connectivity in patients with depression
A study lead by Penn Medicine researchers found that childhood trauma is linked to abnormal connectivity in the brain in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD).
International team decodes the durum wheat genome
An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat -- the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population,
New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature.
The cost of computation
There's been a rapid resurgence of interest in understanding the energy cost of computing.
More sleep may help teens with ADHD focus and organize
Teenagers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from more sleep to help them focus, plan and control their emotions.
You're probably not allergic to vaccines
Five facts about allergies to vaccines, pulled together by two McMaster University physicians.
OHIO study: Acetaminophen can reduce positive empathy for others
A new study by an Ohio University faculty member showed that acetaminophen limited positive empathy a person has for others while taking it.
Is it genetic code or postal code that influence a child's life chances?
Most children inherit both their postal code and their genetic code from their parents.
Gene editing for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa
A group of researchers from the Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Research Center for Energy, Environmental and Technology (CIEMAT), and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD) have led a study which demonstrates the viability of a gene editing strategy for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (also known as butterfly chilidren) with the tool CRISPR/Cas9 in preclinical models with this disease.
Pediatric telemedicine visits may increase antibiotic overprescribing
Children with acute respiratory infections were prescribed antibiotics more often during direct-to-consumer telemedicine visits than during in-person primary care appointments or urgent care visits, according to UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh research reported today in Pediatrics.
Online tool encourages healthy weight gain during pregnancy
Excessive weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk of obesity in both mothers and babies.
Engineers develop concept for hybrid heavy-duty trucks
Researchers at MIT have devised a new way of powering heavy-duty trucks that could drastically curb pollution, increase efficiency, and reduce or even eliminate their net greenhouse gas emissions.
Identifying the grass pollen that gets up your nose
Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to people who live with asthma or hay fever.
Patient shielding provides negligible benefits while increasing risks
A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) makes the case for why it is time to abandon the practice of patient shielding in radiology.
Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids
Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space.
Specific criteria needed for different types of myeloma
When our plasma cells start producing a single cancer-causing protein rather than an array of antibody-like proteins to protect us, it's one of two arms of the Y-shaped protein that's likely to blame.
More than individual landowner issue
Weed species continue to spread and management costs continue to mount, in spite of best management practices and efforts by research and extension personnel who promote them to land managers, said Dr.
Immune cells fighting blood cancer visualized for the first time
When cancer escapes the immune system, our defenses are rendered powerless and are unable to fight against the disease.
New study explains why drinking alcohol causes the munchies
New research in mice suggests that a shared circuit in the brain could be one reason why heavy drinking and high-fat 'junk food' cravings go hand in hand.
Behavioral ecology: Personalities promote adaptability
Bold great tits lay their eggs earlier when under threat, the shy ones put it off.
FSU researcher finds adolescent views of law enforcement can improve over time
A research team, led by Assistant Professor of Criminology Kyle McLean, found that teens' attitudes toward law enforcement tend to improve as they reach adulthood.
Intestinal helminths boost fat burning: Japanese investigators show how
Intestinal infection with helminths -- a class of worm-like parasites -- prevented weight gain in laboratory mice on a high-fat diet.
Carbon-negative power generation for China
Researchers from the Harvard and China have analyzed technical and economic viability for China to move towards carbon-negative electric power generation.
Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection
Roboticists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil.
How education may stave off cognitive decline
Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci.
World-first study shows Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes
Working with Aboriginal rangers in the Kimberley, University of Sydney biologists have published a study with the first empirical evidence that culturally diverse teams produces better conservation results.
From spinal cord injury to recovery
Spinal cord injury disconnects communication between the brain and the spinal cord, disrupting control over part of the body.
Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers
A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense.
Scientists review influenza vaccine research progress and opportunities
In a new series of articles, experts in immunology, virology, epidemiology, and vaccine development detail efforts to improve seasonal influenza vaccines and ultimately develop a universal influenza vaccine.
Disclosure law has improved nurse staffing in New Jersey, Rutgers study finds
A New Jersey law requiring hospitals and nursing homes to publicly report the number of patients per nurse has led to better staffing ratios, a Rutgers study finds.
New computer-aided model may help predict sepsis
Can a computer-aided model predict life-threatening sepsis? A model developed in the UK that uses routinely collected data to identify early symptoms of sepsis, published in CMAJ, shows promise.
What most attracts us to a tourist destination? Attractions, culture and gastronomy
Tourists' expectations when visiting a particular place are related to several features of the chosen destination: culture, architecture, gastronomy, infrastructure, landscape, events, shopping, etc.
TGen review links gene with the most common liver cancer
In an article published in the scientific journal Cancers, researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, provide the first summary of the experimental evidence supporting the AKR1B10 enzyme as a promising therapeutic target for Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), based on a review of more than 50 studies published since this gene was first identified and characterized in 1998.
Antioxidants protect cells from harmful water contaminant
Antioxidants such as vitamin C could help reduce harmful effects from hexavalent chromium, according to a new study performed with human cells.
Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients
A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia.
Climate change impacts peatland CO2 gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions
A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and Natural Resources Institute Finland suggests that peatland CO2 exchange is more strongly influenced by drying than warming as such, and that soil moisture may be critical to determining whether fen ecosystems are able to adapt to a changing climate.
Blood-based colon cancer screen shows promise in UW-Madison study
In a study published April 8, 2019, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group of University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists has identified four blood-based fingerprints -- human protein markers -- associated with the pre-cancerous forms of colon cancer that are most likely to develop into disease.
New technique cuts AI training time by more than 60 percent
Computer science researchers have developed a technique that reduces training time for deep learning networks by more than 60 percent without sacrificing accuracy, accelerating the development of new artificial intelligence (AI) applications.
Decline in physical activity often starts as early as age 7
Overall physical activity starts to decline already around the age of school entry.
New study exonerates refined grains
A study published this week in Advances in Nutrition, a peer-reviewed medical journal from the American Society of Nutrition, boldly substantiates that refined grains have gotten a bad rap.
Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses, U-M study shows
Dangerous airborne viruses are rendered harmless on-the-fly when exposed to energetic, charged fragments of air molecules, University of Michigan researchers have shown.
Insecurities may drive people to save more
When people feel that their own good impressions of themselves are at risk, they may try to increase their savings, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA
Chemical engineers at EPFL have synthesized a biologically-derived metal-organic framework on which the hydrogen bonding that forms the DNA double helix can be mimicked and studied like never before.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Wallace
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Wallace, off the coast of Western Australia.
uliCUT&RUN maps protein binding on chromatin in single cells and single embryos
Originally adapted in 2017, CUT&RUN has since been successfully applied to populations of more than 1,000 cells.
Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species
A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study by the University of Plymouth suggests.
Mass. General study provides insight into use of critical care resources
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units -- intensive care or general medical units -- to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called noninvasive ventilation.
Patients harboring E. coli with highly resistant MCR-1 gene found In NYC hospital
A team of investigators has identified a cluster of four patients harboring Escherichia coli carrying a rare antibiotic resistance gene, mcr-1.
Revolutionary camera allows scientists to predict evolution of ancient stars
For the first time scientists have been able to prove a decades old theory on stars thanks to a revolutionary high-speed camera.
Quashing the resistance: MicroRNA regulates drug tolerance in subset of lung cancers
Relapse of disease following conventional treatments remains one of the central problems in cancer management, yet few therapeutic agents targeting drug resistance and tolerance exist.
Anti-inflammatory medicine can have a beneficial effect on depression
Research carried out by the national psychiatry project iPSYCH shows that arthritis medicine can have a beneficial effect on symptoms of depression.
LDAIR, a lncRNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response
Biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology and the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) at Nagoya University have discovered that long non-coding RNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response in medaka fish.
Novel 5-minute workout improves blood pressure, may boost brain function
Five minutes daily of Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training lowers blood pressure, improves vascular health, boosts fitness and sharpens memory, according to preliminary results presented this week at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando.
Melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise at ever greater rates
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise.
Researchers find brain molecular features associated with years of education
A study led by a team from the University of Barcelona identified greater cortical thickness in the frontal lobe in a group of old people with high levels of education.
Excellent catering: How a bacterium feeds an entire flatworm
In the sandy bottom of warm coastal waters lives Paracatenula -- a small worm that has neither mouth, nor gut.
High rate of sex before age 13 among boys from metropolitan areas
Using information from two national surveys, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Guttmacher Institute have found that in some metropolitan areas, more than a quarter of young, African American men reported having sexual intercourse before age 13, and for about 45 percent of them, the sex was either unwanted or experienced with ''mixed feelings.''
Robots created with 3D printers could be caring for those in golden years
Purdue University researchers have developed a new design method to create soft robots that may help in caregiving for elderly family members.
Elements can be solid and liquid at the same time, study reveals
Scientists have discovered a new state of physical matter in which atoms can exist as both solid and liquid simultaneously.
Negative pressure wound therapy: manufacturer data provided later allow benefit conclusion
Hint and indication of benefit for primary and secondary wound healing, respectively.
Experts issue new recommendations for the diagnosis & treatment of maternal sepsis
Experts in high-risk pregnancies issue new recommendations related to the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis during pregnancy and the postpartum period.
JILA's 5-minute sample processing enhances DNA imaging and analysis
JILA scientists have developed a fast, simple sample preparation method that enhances imaging of DNA to better analyze its physical properties and interactions.
Discovery of a restriction factor for hepatitis B virus
Hepatitis B is a viral liver infection that can lead to acute or chronic conditions.
Resistosome illuminates plant disease resistance mechanisms
In a recent study, a team led by scientists at Tsinghua University (TU) and the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) solved the first structures of a full-length plant NLR protein and uncovered previously unknown mechanisms of this important class of immune receptors.
Cancer drug shortages result in almost no treatment changes, USC study finds
For the vast majority of cancer drugs experiencing shortages over a seven-year period, a new USC research study found no statistically significant effect of shortages on chemotherapy treatment.
Observing a molecule stretch and bend in real-time
An international study, led by ICFO, has observed the bending and stretching of a triatomic molecule with combined attosecond and picometre resolution.
Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties
A team of engineers has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is possible using conventional optical or electronic materials.
Mount Sinai researchers develop treatment that turns tumors into cancer vaccine factories
Researchers at Mount Sinai have developed a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy, injecting immune stimulants directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it and other tumor cells throughout the body.
Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists.
Breakthrough in knowledge of how some sarcomas arise
The origin of certain cancers in the sarcoma group is associated with a hitherto unknown interaction among different proteins.
Astronomers find evidence of a planet with a mass almost 13 times that of Jupiter
Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT), in Chile's Atacama Desert, will help to obtain answers on the formation and evolution of these exotic environments, as well as the possibility of life there.
Study reveals early molecular signs of high-risk pregnancy
Women who have healthy pregnancies tend to show distinct changes in the activities of immune genes starting early in pregnancy, while women who have complicated pregnancies tend to show clear departures from that pattern, according to a new study from a team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and Hospital for Special Surgery.
Dietary supplement boosts cognitive function in vegetarians
Vegetarians who take the dietary supplement creatine may enjoy improved brain function, according to a new study.
Performance-enhancing drugs may increase risk of teen cocaine abuse, impair fertility
Performance-enhancing steroid use could increase the risk of cocaine use and addiction in teens, according to a new rodent study.
Renewables are a better investment than carbon capture for tackling climate change
Solar panels and wind turbines coupled with energy storage offer a better hope for tackling climate change than trying to capture carbon from fossil fuel power stations, according to new research published by Nature Energy.
A tiny cry for help from inside the liver could lead to better treatment
New research points to a potential way to prevent acute liver damage, or even treat it -- as well as a possible way to better monitor the health of patients who have suffered from it.
Moneyball advantage peters out once everyone's doing it: Rotman paper
Sixteen years after author Michael Lewis wrote the book Moneyball, every Major League Baseball (MLB) team uses the technique.
Global study shows exotic species are a complex threat
Researchers disentangle the effects of introduced species on the marine environment.
New DNA 'shredder' technique goes beyond CRISPR's scissors
An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9.
Exploiting metabolic differences to optimize SSRI dosing in adolescents
In a simulated study, exposure to and maximum blood concentrations of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- commonly used to treat anxiety and depression in adolescents -- differed depending on whether the teens modeled were poor, normal, rapid, or ultra-rapid metabolizers of the SSRIs.
Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes
A UW team tested how well current water and wastewater disinfecting methods affect antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial DNA.
Researchers develop first functional targeted inhibitors of peanut allergens
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have effectively prevented the binding of peanut allergens with IgE to suppress the allergic reaction to peanuts using a first-in-class design of allergen-specific inhibitors.
Stillbirth threefold increase when sleeping on back in pregnancy
The findings of the new study, published on The Lancet's EClinicalMedicine, will now be incorporated by the NHS into the Saving Babies' Lives care advice information for pregnant women
Migraine neurobiology linked to prevalence in females
Low doses of a peptide known for decades to be involved in migraine trigger pain responses in female but not male rodents, according to a new research published in JNeurosci.
Migraine-linked protein exhibits sex-specific pain effects
A protein implicated in the development of migraine symptoms caused pain responses in female rodents, but not in males, when introduced into the meninges, potentially helping to explain why migraine is three times more common in women than men.
Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features
By analyzing thousands of declassified images from Cold War-era U2 spy missions, Emily Hammer of the University of Pennsylvania and Jason Ur of Harvard University discovered archaeological features like prehistoric hunting traps, 3,000-year-old irrigation canals, and hidden 60-year-old marsh villages.
Newly devised static negative capacitor could improve computing
In a new study, researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, together with collaborators in France and Russia, have created a permanent static 'negative capacitor,' a device believed to have been in violation of physical laws until about a decade ago.
Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals may have shared genetic traits
A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the genetic profiles of two extinct mammals with African ancestry -- woolly mammoths and Neanderthals -- shared molecular characteristics of adaptation to cold environments.
Tax incentives target poor neighborhoods but leave communities behind
The development of place-based investment tax incentives such as opportunity zones can be explained as a predictable result of the 'pro-gentrification legal, business and political environment that produced them,' said Michelle D.
Advances in deep brain stimulation could lead to new treatments
A new paper published in Nature Reviews Neurology suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and depression.
New findings on the effect of Epsom salt -- Epsom salt receptor identified
A team of scientists headed by Maik Behrens from the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts.
Pollen detectives work to predict asthma and hay fever
The presence of different strains of grass pollen in the atmosphere can help predict when hay fever and asthma could strike, a study involving a University of Queensland researcher has found.
Researchers discover new technique to test for viral infections
A team of researchers at Colorado State University has developed technology that can detect small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood.
Banned pesticides in Europe's rivers
Tests of Europe's rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides -- including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.
Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior
A machine learning model can reproduce the swarming behaviour of locusts -- collaborative research project between the Universities of Konstanz and Innsbruck
Amorphous materials will be used in medical and industrial applications
In this particular paper, Dr. Mokshin's group studied the influence of supercooling on the structure and morphology of the crystalline nuclei arising and growing within a liquid metallic film.
Difficulty in middle age performing activities of daily living associated with adverse outcomes
Vital to quality of life and health for older adults is the ability to perform activities of daily living: bathing, dressing, eating, using the toilet, transferring locations to get in bed or sit in a chair, and walking across a room.
Beer and fodder crop has been deteriorating for 6,000 years
The diversity of the crop sorghum, a cereal used to make alcoholic drinks, has been decreasing over time due to agricultural practice.
Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes
BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time.
Study: Some woodpeckers imitate a neighbor's plumage
In the first global test of the idea, scientists have found evidence that some woodpeckers can evolve to look like another species of woodpecker in the same neighborhood.
Vaccine report calls for innovative transformation strategies to increase influenza immunization rates in underserved communities
Sustainable Healthy Communities announced the publication of a summary report in Vaccine, the leading peer-reviewed journal focused on immunization science, urging health systems, providers and community stakeholders to implement evidence-based strategies to address racial disparities in influenza immunization.
These molecules could trap viruses inside a cell
Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences.
Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?
In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population.
An EEG to assess a baby's developmental risk?
Does exposure to stress early in life affect a baby's brain development, and is there a way to single out babies who might benefit from early intervention?
Body donor's rare anatomy offers valuable lessons
Rose Marie Bentley apparently lived 99 years without knowing she had a rare condition called situs inversus with levocardia, meaning her liver, stomach and other abdominal organs were transposed right to left, but her heart remained on the left side of her chest.
Earth's recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years
Recovering from mass extinction has a 'speed limit,' say researchers, with gradual patterns of ecosystem redevelopment and speciation.
Estimates of emergency department visits for suicide attempts, thoughts among kids, teens
Many children with suicide attempts/suicidal thoughts present to emergency departments (EDs). An analysis of US ED data from 2007 to 2015 estimates annual visits almost doubled from 580,000 to 1.12 million for suicide attempts/suicidal thoughts by children ages 5 to 18 years.
High-capacity transmission over multi-core fiber link with 19-core optical amplifier
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology and Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. report a record SDM transmission experiment using multi-core fiber amplifier.
Breaking down Beowulf
Using a statistical approach known as stylometry, which analyzes everything from the poem's meter to the number of times different combinations of letters show up in the text, a team of researchers found new evidence that Beowulf is the work of a single author.
How common is sex for boys before age 13?
Researchers combined data from two US surveys to examine how common it is for boys to have sex before they turn 13.
Spotted lanternflies found to be flyers, not gliders
The spotted lanternfly is not a strong or frequent flyer, weaknesses that may hinder its ability to travel long distances by air, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
Oral bacteria 'battle royale' helps explain how a pathogen causes hospital infections
In a paper publishing later this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, researchers from the Forsyth Institute and colleagues describe their discovery that three closely related species of bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae outlived all other oral bacteria in long-term starvation or 'doomsday' experiment.
New intervention doubles quit rate among smokers with severe mental illness
Research published in the Lancet Psychiatry has found a dedicated intervention to help people with severe mental illness stop smoking can double quit rates at six months compared to standard care.
Plant diversity increases insect diversity
The more plant species live in grasslands and forests, the more insect species find a habitat there.
New commentary on the famous 'Warning to Humanity' paper brings up global inequalities
By pointing out the western lifestyle is not 'the norm and end goal of societal evolution', a research team contributes to the debate on the urgency of achieving sustainability, as ignited by the largely publicised article 'World Scientists' Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice' (2017).

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