Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 09, 2019


The research of Samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe
The research of samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe.
Retrieving climate history from the ice
In the context of a major European Union project, experts from 14 institutions in ten European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice, looking for the ideal site to investigate the climate history of the past 1.5 million years.
Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology
A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo.
Study explores how technology can help prompt positive memories for people with depression
A team of human-computer interaction researchers from Lancaster University and Trinity College Dublin, have through in-depth interviews with experts in neuropsychology and cognitive behavioral therapies, found that most existing technologies related to supporting memory impairments are focused on 'episodic' impairments, which are closely associated with conditions such as dementia.
Nature could provide the answer for blindness caused by diabetes, say experts
Mother Nature could have the answer to treating several causes of blindness, according to a ground-breaking study involving scientists from the University of Surrey and the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute at Indiana University School of Medicine in the USA.
Life could be evolving right now on nearest exoplanets
Rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting our closest stars could host life, according to a new study that raises the excitement about exoplanets.
How societal attitudes, political rhetoric affect immigrants' health
For immigrants to the United States, the current political climate, and debates over issues such as a border wall, become part of the environment that influences their health, according to a new University of Washington study.
Evidence: Inspirational augmented reality apps can improve brand attitude
More companies are using augmented reality marketing (ARM) to interact with customers.
How artificial intelligence can help in the fight against human trafficking
Code 8.7, a two-day conference, brought together computer science researchers and technologists with policy experts, law enforcement officials, activists and survivors involved in the fight against human trafficking.
'Cthulhu' fossil reconstruction reveals monstrous relative of modern sea cucumbers
An exceptionally preserved fossil from Herefordshire in the UK has given new insights into the early evolution of sea cucumbers, according to an article published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Towards new indicators of vulnerability to psychotic disorders
The decision-making processes of healthy subjects with sub-clinical psychotic episodes are altered in a way that is similar to what happens in subjects with schizophrenia.
Criminal justice system should be cautious when approaching risk assessment
Imagine a parole board trying to figure out whether a previously convicted person eligible for parole poses a future threat to the community.
A new way of finding compounds that prevent aging
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new method for identifying compounds that prevent aging.
NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
A research team led by scientists from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has determined how several antibodies induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers, block infection of cells grown in the laboratory.
Study shows potential for Earth-friendly plastic replacement
New research from The Ohio State University has shown that combining natural rubber with bioplastic in a novel way results in a much stronger replacement for plastic, one that is already capturing the interest of companies looking to shrink their environmental footprints.
Teens face health and safety risks exploring sex online
Teens spend hours every day on internet-connected devices, where limitless opportunities to explore sexuality online.
Ovarian cancer patients undertested for mutations that could guide clinical care
Fewer than a quarter of breast cancer patients and a third of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 2013 and 2014 in two states underwent genetic testing for cancer-associated mutations, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other organizations.
Greener, more efficient natural gas filtration
MIT researchers have developed a new polymer membrane that can dramatically improve the efficiency of natural gas purification, while reducing its environmental impact.
High-intensity interval training increases injuries, Rutgers study finds
People who engage in high-intensity interval training are at greater risk for injury, especially in the knees and shoulders, a Rutgers study found.
Researchers explain signals of CpG 'traffic lights' in DNA
A research team featuring bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has identified reliable markers of gene activity.
Autism symptoms reduced nearly 50% two years after fecal transplant
In a new study, 'Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy in Autism Symptoms and Gut Microbiota,' published in Scientific Reports, Arizona State University researchers Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, Ph.D., James Adams, Ph.D, and lead author Dae-Wook Kang, Ph.D, demonstrate long-term beneficial effects for children diagnosed with ASD through a revolutionary technique known as Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT), a special type of fecal transplant originally pioneered by Dr.
JUUL electronic cigarette products linked to cellular damage
Little is known about the potential health effects of JUUL e-cigarette products that have recently risen in popularity, especially among adolescents.
Mechanism to form influenza A virus discovered
A new study by Maria João Amorim's team, from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science, now reveals where the genomes of the influenza A virus are assembled inside infected cells.
Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration
Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew.
High-strength MRI tracks MS progression
The development of scars, or lesions, in the brain's cortical gray matter is a powerful predictor of neurological disability for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new study.
Massachusetts parental consent law leads to delays for minors seeking abortions
Few studies have examined the impact that the judicial bypass process may have on delaying care for minors seeking abortion.
3D Ultrasound gives clinicians clearer picture to treat gynaecological cancer
By transforming a conventional ultrasound probe, already found in most clinics, the technology can provide a 360-degree, three-dimensional view of surgical tools and surrounding tissue and organs.
Novel study creates new metric to illustrate disadvantaged areas nationwide
Ohio, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia have the highest disparity between opioid-related deaths and access to treatment providers for opioid use disorder (OUD) in the U.S.
Identifying regions that would most benefit from an innovative strategy against malaria
An analysis led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' identifies African regions where ivermectin administration to livestock would have the greatest impact on malaria transmission.
Are brown dwarfs failed stars or super-planets?
Brown dwarfs fill the 'gap' between stars and the much smaller planets.
New to college? Spend some time alone
Seeking solitude -- for the right reasons -- can be good for first-year college students, research suggests.
Study: Trump's 'Repeal and Replace' debate already impacting women's health
Trump recently renewed the repeal and replace battle cry promising to make the 2020 election a referendum on Obamacare.
Many nurse practitioners cannot provide medications to treat opioid addiction
At least six states with high opioid abuse rates also have strong work restrictions that hinder nurse practitioners (NPs) in prescribing medication that can help treat the problem, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Physics tip sheet: APS April Meeting
This tip sheet highlights interesting presentations from the upcoming 2019 APS April Meeting in Denver -- a major international meeting that features talks and presentations about discoveries in astrophysics, particle physics, energy research and many other areas of modern physics.
PSU study shows green roofs could reduce indoor air pollution
Green roofs -- roofs that are planted with vegetation -- may improve the indoor air quality of commercial buildings by cutting the amount of ozone coming into the buildings from the outside, according to new research from Portland State University.
Proton therapy shows efficacy, low toxicity in large cohort of children with high-risk neuroblastoma
Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania analyzed the largest cohort to date of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT), finding both that proton therapy was effective at reducing tumors and demonstrated minimal toxicity to surrounding organs.
Famous cancer-fighting gene also protects against birth defects
New research has revealed how the famous tumour suppressor gene p53 is surprisingly critical for development of the neural tube in female embryos.
High-dose vitamin D shows benefit in patients with advanced colorectal cancer
Results of a small clinical trial suggest that supplementing chemotherapy with high doses of vitamin D may benefit patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by delaying progression of the disease, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Fuel cell advance a breath of fresh air for future power alternative
In an advance that could help lead the way toward longer-lived green energy devices, engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have revealed new insights about the chemical reactions that power fuel cells.
All things could be part of the Internet of Things with new RFID system
Frying pans, pill bottles, yoga mats, coffee cups and countless other nonelectronic objects could be turned into a network of Internet of Things sensors with a new RFID-based technology from the University of Michigan.
Showy primates have smaller testicles
Well-adorned or well-endowed -- but not both. Evolutionary biologists at the University of Zurich have for the first time demonstrated that male primates either have large testicles or showy ornaments.
Digital technology shows promise in supporting nonspecialists to deliver mental health care in low- and middle-income countries
Text messaging, mobile apps, and other digital technologies are being used in innovative ways to support nonspecialist health workers in increasing access to mental health care in low- and middle-income countries (LIMCs), according to a narrative review in the March/April issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry.
Near-simultaneous admissions may affect mortality and length of stay in the ICU
A strain in ICU capacity has been linked to adverse patient outcomes.
Can flipping coins replace animal experiments?
Instead of repeating an experiment in a mouse model of disease in their laboratory, researchers in Berlin, Germany used a coin toss to confirm whether a drug protects the brain against a stroke, as reported in their paper publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology
Police stops unintentionally increase criminal behavior in black and Latino youths
New research by NYU Steinhardt doctoral candidate Juan Del Toro finds that Black and Latino adolescent boys who are stopped by police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior thereafter.
Measurement of semiconductor material quality is now 100,000 times more sensitive
UT Austin engineers have developed a tool to provide quantitative feedback on material quality, with particular applications in optoelectronic devices.
Shining lasers on mouse brains sheds light on cells central to Alzheimer's, schizophrenia
Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia are some of the most common brain disorders and have been associated with problems in cells that contain a type of protein, called parvalbumin.
New wasps named after biscuits and Doctor Who aliens
University of Adelaide researchers were inspired by everything from chocolate biscuits and Doctor Who aliens when choosing names for 10 new species of wasps.
Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand
Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a University of Pennsylvania-led team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective -- a form of empathy -- supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism.
Melatonin's heart protective effects not related to its antioxidant properties
Although melatonin does improve the outcomes of induced heart attacks in rats, those improvements are not the result of its antioxidant effect, new research finds.
ESMO drives EU-level action to tackle shortages of essential medicines
Shortages of essential cancer medicines have a direct impact on patient care across Europe.
A Jetsons future? Assessing the role of flying cars in sustainable mobility
In the 1960s animated sitcom 'The Jetsons,' George Jetson commutes to work in his family-size flying car, which miraculously transforms into a briefcase at the end of the trip.
The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity is found
Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity.
Substituting healthy plant proteins for red meat lowers risk for heart disease
Diets that replaced red meat with healthy plant proteins led to decreases in risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a new study from Harvard T.H.
Lung cancer treatments vary among the Asian communities
A study from the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, sought to examine possible health disparities in the treatment of lung cancer within the Asian community in the US.
Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach
Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq).
Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros
Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility.
Teeth whitening products can harm protein-rich tooth layer
Americans spend more than a billion dollars on teeth whitening products each year.
Bionics: Electric view in murky waters
When dealing with disasters or searching for objects, robots or drones with cameras are usually used.
Study: Medication treatment reduces arrests among people with opioid use disorder
When it comes to addressing the national opioid crisis, most of the research has focused on the physical health risks faced by people with opioid use disorder, such as overdose and infectious disease.
Volunteer birdwatching survey shows effects of temperatures on population of Jays
A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton has used data collected by volunteer bird watchers to study how the importance of wildlife habitat management for British birds depends on changing temperatures.
Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects
MIT chemical engineers have devised an alternative approach to synthesizing epoxides, a type of chemical that is found in many products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and textiles.
First birth after robot-assisted uterus transplant
A boy 48 centimeters long, weighing 2900 grams, is the first baby born after the technological shift in the Swedish world-leading research on uterine transplantation.
Scientists create molecular tool to remove toxic protein from neuronal models of dementia
Harnessing a probe used to image the brain in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease and related forms of dementia, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital have successfully cleared patient-derived brain cells of an abnormal protein associated with dementia and other neurogenerative disorders.
Researchers discover neural patterns key to understanding disorders such as PTSD
Researchers have identified for the first time an imbalance in a key neural pathway between the amygdala and hippocampus that explains how some people reactivate negative emotional memories.
Graphic cigarette warning labels can deter some sales
More than 100 countries have regulations mandating that cigarette packages have graphic warning labels, but the strategy has been blocked in the US by legal actions.
Marijuana for morning sickness? It's not great for baby's brain
With a growing number of states legalizing recreational or medical marijuana, more women are using the drug during pregnancy, in part due to its reported ability to relieve morning sickness.
UNH researchers reveal more than dozen wild bee species declining in Northeast
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.
Cancer-killing combination therapies unveiled with new drug-screening tool
UC San Francisco scientists have designed a large-scale screen that efficiently identifies drugs that are potent cancer-killers when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone.
To lower childhood obesity, don't sugarcoat the facts about sweet drinks
A new study at Columbia University suggests that giving pregnant women and new mothers the facts about the health risks of drinking sugary beverages may help reduce childhood obesity.
Lack of access to antibiotics is a major global health challenge
In a new report, titled 'Access Barriers to Antibiotics' (available April 11, 2019) researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.
Industrial 3D printing goes skateboarding
Plastic pulled from the waste stream can find new use with the Gigabot X, an open source industrial 3D printer.
Most adults dying prematurely of natural causes did not seek medical help, report reveals
About two-thirds of the adults dying prematurely from natural causes did not seek medical help within the 30 days preceding their death, reported forensic researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences (IFS).
Forcing a smile for customers linked with more drinking after work
Employees who force themselves to smile and be happy in front of customers -- or who try to hide feelings of annoyance -- may be at risk for heavier drinking after work, according to researchers.
Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning
Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yaohui Sun and Alex Mogilner of New York University and colleagues.
Over-the-counter antioxidant mix improved vascular health in some heart failure patients
A combination of over-the-counter antioxidants shows promise for mitigating some damaging effects of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a new study reports.
The return of Cthulhu -- the small sea critter
Researchers at Yale, Oxford, the University of Leicester, Imperial College London, and University College London have identified a 430-million-year-old fossil as a new species related to living sea cucumbers.
Researchers reveal novel therapeutic strategy for ALS
Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and their collaborators revealed a new cellular mechanism for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggested a novel therapeutic strategy targeting the RNA degradation pathway, and identified an asthma drug as a potential medication for ALS.
SWOG cancer research network study opens window into immune microenviroment
The first comprehensive study of immune cell types in pre- and post-chemotherapy cancer tissues points up a host of targets for new or existing cancer drugs that could improve patients' sensitivity to both chemotherapy and immunotherapy.
NASA imagery shows winds tearing Tropical Cyclone Wallace
Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Wallace being sheared apart from strong northwesterly winds.
Study gives new insight into how climate change is transforming Virginia's barrier islands
A new study of Virginia's barrier islands off the coast of the Eastern Shore provides a fundamental understanding of how barrier islands will change in the near future amid a warming climate, sea-level rise and storm events such as hurricanes and nor'easters.
More than 90% of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100
New research on how glaciers in the European Alps will fare under a warming climate has come up with concerning results.
Study suggests 'rest is best' for carpal tunnel and similar injuries
In a new study conducted in rats, researchers found a four-week period of rest was nearly as effective as an experimental drug at reducing discomfort and regaining function after an injury from repeated moderate-strain activity.
Animal-assisted therapy improves social behavior in patients with brain injuries
Animal-assisted therapy can foster social competence in patients with brain injuries and increase their emotional involvement during therapy.
Conservationists clash over ways forward despite sharing 'core aims', study finds
Latest research reveals rifts within global conservation movement while confirming support for aims underpinning it.
The anxiety of exposure
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics (Perm), in collaboration with an American colleague, confirmed the theory that impostor syndrome fully mediates the link between perfectionism and psychological distress.
Studies give new insights on immunotherapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC
Two studies to be reported at ELCC 2019 provide new insights on the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), where information has previously been lacking despite being the age group most commonly affected.
Lab tests of blu e-vapor show no evidence of damage to human lung cells
New peer reviewed research commissioned by Imperial Brands was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of blu e-vapor on human airway tissue, compared with conventional cigarette smoke.
Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms
Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity -- and breeding improved varieties can potentially augment the environmental and economic benefits.
New guideline decreases breast cancer re-operation rates
A UBC medical student has determined that a new surgical guideline is making a difference for breast cancer patients.
Combining opioids and marijuana may be advantageous for pain sufferers
Researchers report combining cannabinoids with morphine did not significantly increase impulsivity or memory impairment in a study conducted in rhesus monkeys.
Mapping cellular diversity by looking for common topics of gene control
A Belgian team of computational biologists led by Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has developed a new bioinformatics method called cisTopic.
Tracking the sources of plastic pollution
Plastic pollution in the world's oceans is now widely recognized as a major global challenge -- but we still know very little about how these plastics are actually reaching the sea.
Hepatitis C infections could be prevented by reducing transmission in people who inject drugs
Stepping up efforts to prevent transmission of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs, could reduce future infections by 43% globally, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol published in the Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology today.
Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly
Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature?
Researchers develop quantum device to generate all possible futures simultaneously
A team of researchers from Griffith University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition.
Genome assembly of pasta wheat leads to new insights for modern wheat breeding
Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum) is the basic commodity for the production of pasta, as this cereal plant yields grains with the necessary high content of gluten proteins.
Half-hearted: New insight into why the heart doesn't develop properly in some children
Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina have found evidence that the gene Ccdc117 supports the rapid growth of precursor cells needed for proper development of right-sided heart structures.
New research about biodiversity reveals the importance of climate on today's abundance of life
Natural history museum paleontologists in Copenhagen and Helsinki have succeeded in mapping historical biodiversity in unprecedented detail.
Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents
A new study to be presented at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed.
The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history
A European research consortium, in which the University of Bern is involved in, wants to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica.
Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH
New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that many cell wall enzymes that were previously considered 'redundant' are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments.
Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction
A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according to new research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers.
Too hungry to learn -- new research provides food for thought
Food insecurity -- that is, limited access to sufficient safe and nutritious food at home -- negatively impacts on the learning ability of adolescents in India, new research shows.
New method for evaluating cancer risk of chemicals is quick, precise, inexpensive
Researchers from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health have developed and evaluated a fast, accurate and cost-effective approach to assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals -- that is, whether exposure to a chemical increases a person's long-term cancer risk.
Pin-sized sensor could bring chemical ID to smartphone-sized devices
Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a spectrometer so small and simple that it could integrate with the camera of a typical cellphone without sacrificing accuracy.
Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination
Researchers from the University of Toronto presented a new study at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok that aimed to determine the effect of authors' self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research.
Study reports on bacterial STIs among men using PrEP
This study, which included nearly 3,000 mostly gay and bisexual men in Australia who received daily HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), reports on the association of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by describing diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis among the men and behavioral risk factors.
Underwater forests a treasure trove of new drugs
Defensive compounds produced by microbes are a major source of antibiotics and other important medicines.
High-tech tissue study reveals which cells drive a painful food allergy
An eight-year hunt for the cells that drive the extreme childhood food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has identified a potential new way to treat the disease while also raising questions about a dietary supplement often taken to reduce bowel inflammation.
New algorithm helps to detect and analyze suspicious activity in surveillance footage
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, could make it easier to track and process suspicious activity in surveillance footage.
Teen series continue to feature stereotyped characters that perpetuate gender differences
A study has sought to identify and analyse adolescents' favourite kind of character in Spanish teen series.
Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering report that graphene -- wonder material of the 21st century -- may take the oxygen out of lithium battery fires.
Single-cell sequencing reveals landscape of immune cell subtypes in lung cancer tumors
Single-cell sequencing reveals 25 subpopulations of myeloid cells, a poorly understood family of immune cells, in lung cancer tumors.
Number of nonsmokers with COPD on the rise
The global burden of COPD is high, and prevalence of nonsmokers with COPD has been increasing.
Researchers develop new vaccine against deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Saudi Arabia and Canada developed a potent and safe vaccine that protects against the deadly Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS.
Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped
The oldest publicly available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time.
Next-generation gene drive arrives
Scientists developed a new version of a gene drive that allows the spread of specific, favorable genetic variants, also known as 'alleles,' throughout a population.
Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants
Whether we know it or not, enzymes play a role in a range of everyday products, from orange juice to denim jeans.
Gene responsible for toxic metal accumulation in durum wheat identified
University of Alberta biologists identify gene responsible for cadmium accumulation in durum wheat, according to a new study published in Nature Genetics.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.