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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 11, 2019


Lots of patients with cancer, cancer survivors use but don't report complementary/alternative medicine therapies
This study used data from a nationwide survey to estimate how many patients with cancer and cancer survivors use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMS) in addition to or instead of conventional therapies, and how many don't disclose that to their physicians.
Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals.
CNIO researchers succeed at removing some types of pancreatic cancer in animal models
Until now, no full regression had been observed in advanced pancreatic cancer in experimental models.
Gender gap in spatial reasoning starts in elementary school, meta-analysis finds
Males gain a slight advantage in mental-rotation performance during the first years of formal schooling, and this advantage slowly grows with age, tripling in size by the end of adolescence.
The Lancet: Inappropriate pain management after surgery is a major cause of the opioid crisis
Targets to eliminate pain after surgery have driven increases in the use of opioids, and are a major cause of the opioid crisis in the USA, Canada and other countries.
New research: Optimize open floor plans by shuffling workstations
New research from the Tepper School of Business suggests that changing work spaces pushes people out of their comfort zones, allowing employees to learn from each other and generate more innovative ideas.
NASA Twins Study includes San Antonio multiomics center
The NASA Twins Study compares the health of identical twin astronauts, one who spent a year in spaceflight while the other remained on Earth.
Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench
Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean -- the Mariana Trench.
Study: How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?
How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as 'move to a cooler place.'
Advanced virtual technology captures how coral reefs recover after bleaching
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and engineers at UC San Diego have used new imaging software to detect dramatic recovery after a bleaching event on the reefs surrounding remote Palmyra Atoll in the tropical Pacific.
University of Arkansas project makes a difference for low-income youth with disabilities
A new report finds that a University of Arkansas project called Arkansas PROMISE has succeeded in increasing services, training, employment and income for low-income youth with disabilities.
Ice Ages occur when tropical islands and continents collide
Earth's steady state is warm and balmy, but half a dozen times over the past billion years, the planet developed ice caps and glaciers.
Rice, Northwestern find new ways to image, characterize unique material
Researchers at Rice and Northwestern have imaged and modeled the unique geometry of 2D borophene, a material that could surpass the promises of graphene for electronic, thermal, optical and other applications.
Body mass index may play a significant role in the progression of multiple sclerosis
A newly published paper in the Lancet journal EBioMedicine identifies a link between high levels of blood lipids and worsening of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who are overweight or obese.
New research adds to work of Prandtl, father of modern aerodynamics
Not only will this discovery be important for agriculture, aviation and weather prediction, but it will also be vital for climate change research and associated sea-level rise, as accurate prediction of katabatic surface wind profiles over large ice sheets and glaciers is critical in energy balance of melting ice.
CRISPR-Cas3 innovation holds promise for disease cures, advancing science
A Cornell researcher, who is a leader in developing a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, and colleagues have used the new method for the first time in human cells - a major advance in the field.
World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy
Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission.
Prostate medicines linked to type 2 diabetes risk, study suggests
Men taking medicines to reduce the symptoms of prostate disease may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, a study led by the University of Edinburgh and UCL suggests.
2D gold quantum dots are atomically tunable with nanotubes
Gold atoms ski along boron nitride nanotubes and stabilize in metallic monolayers.
AI identifies risk of cholesterol-raising genetic disease, Stanford-led study finds
A new algorithm can determine whether a patient is likely to have a cholesterol-raising genetic disease that can cause early, and sometimes fatal, heart problems, reports a new study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.
Oregon scientists drill into white graphene to create artificial atoms
By drilling holes into a thin two-dimensional sheet of hexagonal boron nitride with a gallium-focused ion beam, University of Oregon scientists have created artificial atoms that generate single photons, which work in air and room temperature.
Kennedy Krieger research scientist explores Leonardo da Vinci's knowledge of the brain
Jonathan Pevsner, PhD, professor and research scientist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, wrote an article featured in the April edition of The Lancet titled, 'Leonardo da Vinci's studies of the brain.' In the piece, Pevsner highlights the exquisite drawings and curiosity, dedication and scientific rigor that led Leonardo to make penetrating insights into how the brain functions.
One-two punch helps solve greatest unmet need in cardiology
Combining a high-fat diet with a drug that raises blood pressure gave UT Southwestern researchers a 'two-hit' model, like a one-two punch to heart failure.
Getting back to work after a heart attack
Heart attack patients with the desire to return to work can do it.
Johns Hopkins researchers create novel cell model of aging-related colon cancer risk
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say a new study of clusters of mouse cells known as ''organoids'' has significantly strengthened evidence that epigenetic changes, common to aging, play a essential role in colon cancer initiation.
Biologists uncover new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics
A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits.
Astronaut twins study yields new insights and portable DNA sequencing tools
Long-term spaceflight causes more changes to gene expression than shorter trips, especially to the immune system and DNA repair systems, according to research by Weill Cornell Medicine and NASA investigators as part of NASA's Twins Study, which followed the only set of identical twin astronauts for more than a year.
In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease
Treatment with a choline kinase inhibitor prompts immune cells to clear away damaged mitochondria, thus reducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and preventing inflammation.
Scientists capture a 'snapshot' of bacterial stress-response regulator's 'recycling truck'
A Brown University-led team found that RssB -- a protein that specifically recognizes a critical stress-response master regulator in bacteria and delivers it to the recycling machinery somewhat like a recycling truck -- forms a compact structure with a factor that inhibits RssB activity.
New method may transport medicine better through the body
One of the major challenges in fighting inflammation is to get the medicine transported properly through the body.
Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies
A study in Cerebral Cortex provides new insight into why -- and when -- anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains.
Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 predicts advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis
AKR1B10 is a useful serum biomarker for advanced liver fibrosis in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and, combined with serum WFA(+)-M2BP, it can predict hepatocellular carcinoma development, gastroesophageal varix formation, and poor prognosis.
NEJM applying universal standards of care to Ebola virus disease
LSTM's Senior Clinical Lecturer, Dr. Shevin Jacob, is corresponding author on a perspective piece published in the New England Journal of Medicine calling for universal standards of care to be applied in relation to ebola virus disease.
Microbes in the human body swap genes, even across tissue boundaries, study indicates
Bacteria in the human body are sharing genes with one another at a higher rate than is typically seen in nature, and some of those genes appear to be traveling -- independent of their microbial hosts -- from one part of the body to another, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports.
Protein complex may help prevent neurodegenerative diseases
The protein complex NAC in the cell helps to prevent the aggregration of proteins associated with several neurodegenerative diseases.
Opioid epidemic may have cost US governments $37.8 billion in tax revenue
The opioid epidemic may have cost U.S. state and federal governments up to $37.8 billion in lost tax revenue due to opioid-related employment loss, according to Penn State researchers.
Kidney Health Atlas reveals global burden of disease and inequities in access
A global study of the burden of kidney disease will be released at the World Congress of Nephrology in Melbourne, Australia.
'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners
Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions.
Near-atomic map of parathyroid hormone complex points toward new therapies for osteoporosis
An international team of scientists has mapped a molecular complex that could aid in the development of better medications with fewer side effects for osteoporosis and cancer.
Bright spot analysis for photodynamic diagnosis of brain tumors using confocal microscopy
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have found that bright spot areas have generally lower fluorescence in brain tumors than in normal tissues in images captured by irradiation with a 405 nm wavelength laser and 544.5-619.5 nm band-pass filter.
Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect.
Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners
When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them.
Rethinking conservation efforts for improved biodiversity
A study published online by the journal Science, looked into why the global commitment towards the expansion of protected areas has not delivered the expected conservation benefits.
Medicaid reimbursement to treat cancer patients with radiation therapy varies widely
A new study finds wide state-by-state variations in Medicaid reimbursements to physicians who treat cancer patients with radiation therapies.
Chronic diseases restrict the mobility of older people -- often unconsciously
Chronic diseases are a key factor limiting the mobility of older people.
Scientists say world's protected areas need a re-boot
An international study published today in the journal Science argues that the current international target for the protected area estate, accepted by over 190 nations, is failing.
Despite years of progress, many african countries have wide variation in vaccine coverage
Many African nations have made substantial progress in vaccinating children against life-threatening diseases, however, within countries wide discrepancies remain, according to a new scientific study.
The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species
Known to science since 1857, a common species of frog found from north-eastern Honduras through to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its 'multiple identities' a secret.
Astronaut has no lingering, major epigenetic differences from earthbound twin brother
In a landmark study, a group of US scientists from Johns Hopkins, Stanford University and other institutions has found no long-lasting, major differences between the epigenomes of astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a year in space aboard the International Space Station, and his twin brother, Mark, who remained on Earth.
Rutgers scientists discover new role for sensory signals in the brain
Learning how to tie a shoe or shoot a basketball isn't easy, but the brain somehow integrates sensory signals that are critical to coordinating movements so you can get it right.
Multiple Denisovan-related ancestries in Papuans
Researchers examined DNA fragments passed down from Neanderthals and Denisovans to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea and found: the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, which had been separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years.
New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death
Using a novel optical imaging technique, Northwestern University's Vadim Backman and researchers discovered connections between the macromolecular structure and dynamic movement of chromatin within eukaryotic cells.
Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is effective and well tolerated in individuals with hepatitis C
Two large 'real-world' studies conducted in Germany and the USA have confirmed the high rates of sustained virological response (SVR) observed in controlled clinical studies of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (G/P) involving individuals with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.
Engineers tap DNA to create 'lifelike' machines
Tapping into the unique nature of DNA, Cornell engineers have created simple machines constructed of biomaterials with properties of living things.
USC research shows remedy for painful jaw disease
USC researchers and collaborators report a breakthrough to prevent osteonecrosis of the jaw, a side effect suffered by some people undergoing treatment for cancer or osteoporosis.
People turn to consumerism to confront problems, grief and feelings
People are increasingly turning to commercial settings as outlets for their emotions, confronting problems, grief and feelings.
Maintenance immunotherapy fails to improve survival in extensive small cell lung cancer
Maintenance immunotherapy fails to improve survival in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to late-breaking results from the CheckMate 451 study to be presented today at the European Lung Cancer Congress (ELCC) 2019.
Researchers observe formation of a magnetar 6.5 billion light years away
Building on recent discoveries about neutron stars, a team of astronomers has identified X-ray observations that are consistent with the merger of two neutron stars.
Getting closer: Finding out why the immune system attacks itself
University of Houston biomolecular engineer Navin Varadarajan thinks B cells gone bad could be the culprit in Rheumatoid Arthritis and he is the first to publish a comprehensive profile of the cells, moving closer to finding out why the immune system attacks itself in patients with RA.
Biophotonic therapy eliminates bacteria and viruses from organs before transplantation
Method developed by scientists in Brazil and Canada can prevent transmission of diseases to organ recipients.
Could 'sensitive' interventions be a tipping point in addressing climate change?
In a Policy Forum, Doyne Farmer and colleagues discuss how seemingly slight interventions in sensitive social and political systems can have large and far-reaching effects, possibly making averting an oncoming climate catastrophe a possibility.
Psychologists find smiling really can make people happier
Smiling really can make people feel happier, according to a new paper published in Psychological Bulletin.
Measuring iceberg production with earthquakes
An international team led by French researchers from the CNRS and Paris Diderot University came up with the idea of using earthquakes generated when icebergs break away -- felt hundreds of kilometres off -- to measure this ice loss.
The FASEB Journal: New strategy to reduce cancer drug's cardiotoxic effects
Doxorubicin (Doxo) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for cancer, though it can have toxic effects on the heart.
Researchers call for rethink of external NHS inspections amid questions of effectiveness
Researchers at the University of York have shown that costly external NHS hospital inspections are not associated with improvements in quality of care.
Ancient DNA reveals new branches of the Denisovan family tree
A study examining DNA fragments passed down from these ancient hominins to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea now suggests that the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years.
Astronomers successfully obtain first ever image of a black hole
The very first image of a black hole has been obtained by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a network of eight radio telescopes on four different continents designed for this purpose.
Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science
Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean.
Tax deductions: Holding the SALT leaves a bitter taste for homebuyers
Ghoddusi develops a model to explore the effectiveness of a mortgage as a tax shield amid uncertainty.
AI agent offers rationales using everyday language to explain its actions
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers, in collaboration with Cornell University and University of Kentucky, have developed an artificially intelligent (AI) agent that can automatically generate natural language explanations in real-time to convey the motivations behind its actions.
Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution
Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers.
Fishy diagnostics for food allergy testing
James Cook University scientists in Australia have found material commonly used for fish allergy testing is unreliable -- potentially putting lives at risk.
Lower pension, shorter life
Income and social status have an increasing effect on life expectancy in Germany.
Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss
Multiple new genes involved in hearing loss have been revealed in a large study of mouse mutants by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, King's College London, and colleagues.
NASA Twins Study: A year in space has little effect on gut microbiome
A year in space seems to have a small but significant, transient effect on the gut microbiome, according to a new paper on the NASA Twins Study published in the journal Science.
Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors
Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies.
Case of tick-borne relapsing fever in Mexico
Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is a recurring fever caused by exposure to infected Borrelia bacteria.
One-third of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine
A stunning one-third of people with a cancer diagnosis use complementary and alternative medicines such as meditation, yoga, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and supplements.
Privacy curtains used in healthcare worldwide are a potential source of drug-resistant bacteria transmission to patients
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that contamination of privacy curtains with multidrug-resistant organisms is a common problem and could be a source of disease transmission to patients.
UK study shows most patients with suspected urinary tract infection and treated with antibiotics actually lack evidence of this infection
New research presented at this week's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) shows that only one third of patients that enter the emergency department with suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) actually have evidence of this infection, yet almost all are treated with antibiotics, unnecessarily driving the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.
How plants defend themselves
Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system.
Inner electrons behave differently in aromatic hydrocarbons
In an international research collaboration between Tsinghua University in Beijing and Sorbonne University in Paris, scientists found that four hydrocarbon molecules, known for their internal ring structure, have a lower threshold for the release of excess energy than molecules without a similar ring structure, because one of their electrons decays from a higher to a lower energy level, a phenomenon called the Auger effect.
New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
'Nanobodies' from alpacas could help bring CAR T-cell therapy to solid tumors
Most CAR T-cell therapies look for antigens specific to cancer cells.
NASA twin study provides multi-omics view of human body's response to year in space
The NASA Twins Study is the most comprehensive integrated multi-omics, molecular, physiological, and behavioral analysis of how the human body responds to space flight to date.
Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests
During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests.
New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a new microscopy approach for imaging gel nanocomposites in their natural state, which will reveal more useful information about their assembly and properties.
People with a sense of oneness experience greater life satisfaction
People who believe in oneness -- the idea that everything in the world is connected and interdependent -- appear to have greater life satisfaction than those who don't, regardless of whether they belong to a religion or don't, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Rare gut condition a model for study of genetic diseases
A study published online in the April 11, 2019 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that Hirschsprung disease is more predictable from an individual's genetic makeup than previously thought.
Biosynthesis of widespread pigments from bacteria revealed
Bacteria can protect themselves from the attack of free radicals using specific natural products in their membranes.
NASA Twins Study offers new insight on how a human's body responds to spaceflight
Colorado State University Professor Susan Bailey, who studies telomeres, or the protective 'caps' on the ends of chromosomes, found that Scott Kelly's telomeres in his white blood cells got longer while in space.
Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants
Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows.
CNIO researchers assess melanoma progression with a new liquid biopsy technique
Analysis of extracellular vesicles and circulating DNA from fluid obtained from the drainage implanted after surgery, normally disposed of as medical waste, detects melanoma patients with risk of recurrence and may help doctors decide who should undergo adjuvant therapy The new technique might change the way melanoma patients are followed up.
Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family
Research scientists led by the University of Kent have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage.
Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments
Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma.
Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice.
Infinite number of quantum particles gives clues to big-picture behaviour at large scale
In quantum mechanics, measuring both the position and speed of a particle at the same time is not possible.
The right polymers for the job
One of the most promising clean energy technologies just got even better.
NASA sees El Niño conditions prevail in the Central Pacific Ocean
An El Niño that began to form last fall has matured and is now fully entrenched across the Pacific Ocean.
Molecules that curb errant proteins of AL amyloidosis point to new type of therapy
Scientists at Scripps Research have identified a group of small molecules that prevent structural changes to proteins that are at the root of AL amyloidosis, a progressive and often fatal disease.
New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by Bath physicists
Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors.
More Michigan students taking, passing advanced math
Michigan high school students are going above and beyond the required math curriculum, likely an effect of the state's graduation requirements, finds new research from Michigan State University.
NASA Twins Study finds spaceflight affects gut bacteria
During his yearlong stay on the International Space Station (ISS), astronaut Scott Kelly experienced a shift in the ratio of two major categories of bacteria in his gut microbiome.
Rapid urbanization increasing pressure on rural water supplies globally
An international team of researchers has carried out the first systematic global review of water reallocation from rural to urban regions -- the practice of transferring water from rural areas to cities to meet demand from growing urban populations.
Getting to the root of plant simulations
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory developed a new algorithm to bolster what once were static models of root dynamics, providing researchers a clearer picture of what's really happening beneath the soil.
Texts like networks: How many words are sufficient to recognize the author?
We are more original than we think -- this is what is being suggested by literary text analysis carried out by a new method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences.
Autism rate rises 43 percent in New Jersey, Rutgers study finds
A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the percentage of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder in New Jersey.
Crucial 'electrical switch' in brain revealed in study published by Science
Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood.
Child vaccination levels falling short in large parts of Africa
A study by the University of Southampton shows that several low- and middle-income countries, especially in Africa, need more effective child vaccination strategies to eliminate the threat from vaccine-preventable diseases.
I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves.
Study suggests the majority of tourniquets used in medical procedures are contaminated
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that a majority of tourniquets inspected contained microbes which could put patient safety and care quality at risk.
Human genomics and physiology in the final frontier: Results from the NASA Twins Study
The health impacts of NASA's longest-duration human spaceflight are detailed in a new study comparing astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a year in orbit, with his twin, Mark, back home on Earth.
Warm winds in autumn could strain Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf
New research shows that the Larsen C ice shelf -- the fourth largest ice shelf in Antarctica -- experienced an unusual spike in late summer and early autumn surface melting in the years 2015 to 2017.
Longer neutrophil lifespan may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal inflammation
The increased survival of white blood cells called neutrophils is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome of HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published April 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nichole Klatt of the University of Miami, and colleagues.
Immune responses in Ebola survivors 2 years after infection provide clues for vaccine development
Scientists have discovered that 2 years after infection, West African Ebola survivors exhibit memory immune responses -- including specific T cells against Ebola virus.
Time for a new global protected area target
The world needs a new international protected area target based on scientific evidence, according to a team including University of Queensland scientists.
New super-accurate optical atomic clocks pass critical test
Researchers have measured an optical clock's ticking with record-breaking accuracy while also showing the clock can be operated with unprecedented consistency.
Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more
During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...