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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 12, 2019


Study questions the sustainability of plant ingredients as fishmeal substitutes
Substituting fishmeal in aquaculture feeds with plant ingredients may not be as beneficial for the environment as many predict, according to new research from an international team of experts.
Mode of delivery alters infants' gut microbiota and this may impact respiratory health in first year of life
New research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (April 13-16), suggests that mode of delivery influences the development of the microbial composition of the gut (i.e. the gut microbiota) in infants, independently of a mother's use of antibiotics.
Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms.
Digital parent training for child's disruptive behavior successful in primary health care
A program developed for the early detection of children's disruptive behavior and low-threshold digital parent training intervention was successfully transferred to child health clinics in primary health care, shows a new Finnish study.
Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can track and map active neurons as accurately as a human can, but in a fraction of the time.
Zinc oxide reduces body odor caused by bacteria and aids wound healing
New research presented at this week's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that a formulation containing zinc oxide is effective at reducing armpit odour through killing the responsible bacteria, and assists in wound healing.
Heads in the cloud: Scientists predict internet of thoughts 'within decades'
An international collaboration led by researchers at UC Berkeley and the US Institute for Molecular Manufacturing predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AI, and computation will lead this century to the development of a ''Human Brain/Cloud Interface'' (B/CI), that connects neurons and synapses in the brain to vast cloud-computing networks in real time.
Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook
A Northwestern University study quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines.
SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios fail
A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don't work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air.
Microbiome of baby's first stool is associated with overweight at age 3 years
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the early microbiome (population of gut bacteria) in newborn babies is able to predict the risk of the child subsequently becoming overweight.
Population health: A rapidly evolving discipline in US academic medicine
Leaders from department-level initiatives across the US weigh in on how academic medicine is embracing population health and the opportunities med schools have to make an impact, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Network Open.
App predicts risk of developing hernia following abdominal surgery
A new app can predict the likelihood that a patient will develop an incisional hernia following abdominal surgery, using big data to potentially help address a problem effects one out of every eight of these surgical patients.
BU scientists find electrostimulation can improve working memory in people
In a groundbreaking study published in Nature Neuroscience, Boston University researchers demonstrate that electrostimulation can improve the working memory of people in their 70s so that their performance on memory tasks is indistinguishable from that of 20-year-olds.
Tiny light-up barcodes identify molecules by their twinkling
An imaging technique developed at Duke University could make it possible to peer inside cells and watch dozens of different molecules at once -- by labeling them with short strands of light-up DNA that blink on and off with their own unique rhythm.
Listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks in very different ways
In the future, a new brain research method could be used to study creativity.
High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day.
Diesel exhaust filtered of its tiny particles may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment
Air pollution from diesel engines may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment more when tiny particles are filtered from the exhaust than when they are not, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Improved procedure for cancer-related erectile dysfunction
Melbourne surgeons have modified a minimally invasive technique to help men regain erectile function lost after prostate cancer surgery.
Columbia experience could help reduce UK knife crime and street violence
A leading public health expert says the UK should learn lessons from systematic violence reduction work in Cali, Columbia to tackle rising rates of knife crime on British streets.
Starvation study shows bacteria's survival skills
A larger genetic inventory may help explain how certain dangerous bacteria can persist in a hospital environment and continue to infect patients, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Move more to live longer
Improving fitness doesn't require doing activities you don't like. That's the main message of research presented today at EuroPrevent 2019.
Thunderstorms half a world away significantly contribute to heat waves in central California
Scientists reveal links between unusually strong tropical convection and extreme California heat waves.
CD30: From witness to culprit
Cells of certain blood cancers such as Hodgkin's lymphoma carry the protein CD30 on their surface.
We now know how insects and bacteria control ice
in a paper published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society University of Utah professor Valeria Molinero and her colleagues show how key proteins produced in bacteria and insects can either promote or inhibit the formation of ice, based on their length and their ability to team up to form large ice-binding surfaces.
Predicting heat waves? Look half a world away
When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days.
ICU patients with non-brain-related injuries may suffer undetected cognitive dysfunction
Researchers assessed 20 patients as they left the ICU and every single patient had detectable cognitive deficits in two or more cognitive areas of investigation, including memory, attention, decision-making and reasoning.
New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores
The origin of giant apatite-iron oxide ores of the so-called 'Kiruna-type' has been the topic of a long standing debate that has lasted for over 100 years.
Want to quit smoking? Partner up
Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Singapore and Australian scientists build a machine to see all possible futures
A team of researchers from Singapore and Australia have implemented a prototype quantum device that can generate and analyze a quantum superposition of possible futures.
Bigger portions lead to preschoolers eating more over time
Researchers found that when served larger portions of typical meals or snacks, preschoolers consumed more food, both by weight and calories.
SRC-1 gene variants linked to human obesity
Researchers have discovered how the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control.
New method inverts the self-assembly of liquid crystals
In liquid crystals, molecules automatically arrange themselves in an ordered fashion.
Ability to lift weights quickly can mean a longer life
Prolong your life by increasing your muscle power. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a congress of the European Society of Cardiology.
Researchers of the University of Malaga relate DNA methylation levels to obesity
A multidisciplinary study performed at the University of Malaga (UMA) has related DNA methylation levels to the development of the metabolic disease associated with obesity.
Experts provide new guidelines to athletes on protein intake
A review led by a sports scientist at the University of Stirling has set out new international guidelines for protein intake in track and field athletes.
Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks
In a study of healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may solidify the memories of new skills we just practiced a few seconds earlier by taking a short rest.
Neutral Zinc-air battery with cathode NiCo/C-N shows outstanding performance
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Hunan University of Science and Technology have proposed a novel strategy for the synthesis of non-precious metal catalysts in zinc-air batteries that do not compromise its electroactivity, affordability and stability.
Growth hormone acts to prevent weight loss
A Brazilian study shows that, like leptin, growth hormone contributes directly to energy conservation when the body loses weight.
Genetic variant linked to cucumber fruit length
Fruit size is a major determinant of yield and market value.
Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications
Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers faster and more efficiently than ever.
Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA
Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data.
Stem Cell trial for osteoarthritis patients reduces pain, improves quality of life
In the first North American stem cell clinical trial for osteoarthritis of the knee patients, 12 patients were given injections of their own stem cells and followed for 12 months.
Medicaid could save $2.6 billion within a year if just 1% of recipients quit smoking
Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco.
Quantum simulation more stable than expected
A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers.
Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance
A study published in Nature Communications revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before.
Increase in foreign body ingestions among young children
A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for children younger than six years who were treated in a US emergency department due to concern of a foreign body ingestion from 1995 through 2015.
Harmful compounds might be formed when foods containing the sweetener sucralose are heated
Sucralose is a sweetener authorized in the European Union as E 955.
Lack of awareness of inequality means we penalize those who have least money
People can automatically assume that someone who gives less money to charity is less generous, according to new research.
'Molecular scissors' for plastic waste
A research team from the University of Greifswald and Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin (HZB) has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II.
Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants
In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life.
Men sometimes act less interested in sex -- in order to get it
In a new study, women said they acted a little more interested in sex than they really were.
Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans
Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds.
Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems
A research team at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms.
The trouble with thaw
A recent study shows that nitrous oxide emissions from thawing Alaskan permafrost are about twelve times higher than previously assumed.

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