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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 15, 2019


What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?
Lara Marrone and Jared Sterneckert from the Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), together with collaborating scientists from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the USA, have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought.
FDA ban on menthol is likely to survive tobacco industry lawsuits
A proposed ban of menthol combustible tobacco products by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will likely be upheld in court, albeit a lengthy legal process, a Rutgers paper found.
Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories.
Low-intensity ultrasound can change decision-making process in the brain, research shows
This is a peer-reviewed empirical study conducted in animals (macaque monkeys) The study shows how low-intensity ultrasonic waves can be used to generate or suppress electrical signals in the brain, modulating normal brain function.
Genetic analysis has potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of adults with liver disease of unknown cause
Adults suffering from liver disease of unknown cause represent an understudied and underserved patient population.
Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures
Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis.
For busy medical students, two-hour meditation study may be as beneficial as longer course
For time-crunched medical students, taking a two-hour introductory class on mindfulness may be just as beneficial for reducing stress and depression as taking an eight-week meditation course, a Rutgers study finds.
90 percent of teens killed by an intimate partner are girls
Intimate partner homicide among teens does occur and 90 percent of the victims are girls, according to a new study in JAMA Pediatrics.
Solving the mystery of fertilizer loss from Midwest cropland
Farmers can't predict their annual corn harvest with certainty, but with the help of new research from Michigan State University, they can now pinpoint specific parts of their fields that consistently produce either good or bad yields.
Astronomers take first, high-resolution look at huge star-forming region of Milky Way
A team of astronomers used a newly commissioned radio telescope in South Korea to make the first high-resolution observations of the molecular clouds within a star-forming region of the Milky Way.
Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall
UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow, a first.
PSU researchers develop blockchain protocol to prevent counterfeit pharmaceutical sales
Portland State University researcher Nirupama Bulusu wants to prevent counterfeit pharmaceuticals from flooding the market.
Physicists improve understanding of heat and particle flow in the edge of a fusion device
PPPL physicists have discovered valuable information about how plasma flows at the edge inside doughnut-shaped fusion devices.
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs.
APOE gene has a gender-based effect on sleep behaviour of Alzheimer's disease patients
The Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and sleep disturbances are commonly associated with AD.
Asteroids help scientists to measure the diameters of faraway stars
Using the unique capabilities of telescopes specialized on cosmic gamma rays, scientists have measured the smallest apparent size of a star on the night sky to date.
MU neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome
The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system.
First-year doctors spend almost 90% of their time away from patients
Largest study to date uncovers the reality of young doctors' lives in the hospital.
A simple nudge leads low-income immigrants to apply for citizenship
Through a randomized field experiment, researchers at Stanford's Immigration Policy Lab demonstrate that a low-cost nudge informing immigrants about their eligibility for a federal fee waiver increased rates of citizenship applications.
Transparency from charities about how funds are used builds trust and increases giving
Charitable and humanitarian organizations are increasingly tapping into a $30 billion crowdfunding market, not only to raise funds but to build donors' trust by being more transparent, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J.
NRL develops laser processing method to increase efficiency of optoelectronic devices
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) discovers new method to passivate defects in next generation optical materials.
Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?
During harsh winters, birds that eat conifer seeds sometimes leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal ranges in search of food.
Irregular schedules raise risk of injury for miners working long hours
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago examined how and why long work shifts increase the risk for injury among miners of all kinds.
Labeling added sugars content on packaged foods and beverages could lower heart disease/diabetes risk and cut healthcare costs
Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs.
Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children
Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
Eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients.
US and Japanese researchers identify how liver cells protect against viral attacks
Researchers in Chapel Hill, N.C., and Tokyo have discovered a mechanism by which liver cells intrinsic resistance to diverse RNA viruses is regulated.
Some patients with imminently fatal cancer still receive treatment
Patients who died within one month of being newly diagnosed with metastatic cancer in the United States received ineffective surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapy.
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey.
Cognitive functioning does not predict weight-loss outcome for adolescents
Young people with cognitive impairments and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, have similar weight-loss trajectories to those with typical cognitive function after bariatric surgery, according to a new study in Pediatrics authored by psychologists at Children's National Health System.
SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera' films molecular movie in HD
With an extremely fast 'electron camera' at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have made the first high-definition 'movie' of ring-shaped molecules breaking open in response to light.
The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world
Physicists at the Santa Fe Institute and MIT have shown that Markov processes, widely used to model complex systems, must unfold over a larger space than previously assumed.
Auction bids decline with intensity of competition: new research
People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests.
North Atlantic warming hole impacts jet stream
The North Atlantic warming hole (NAWH), a region of reduced warming located in the North Atlantic Ocean, significantly affects the North Atlantic jet stream in climate simulations of the future, according to a team of researchers.
Cometary surprise found inside meteorite
An ancient sliver of the building blocks from which comets formed was discovered by a Carnegie-led research team encased inside a meteorite like an insect in amber.
Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold.
Time is money, especially when it comes to giving
Would you be more likely to donate to charity if you could report the gift sooner on your taxes?
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.
New study first to identify cause of rare genetic metabolic disorder
A new study from BC Children's Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and an international team of researchers published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the first to identify a rarely-seen type of DNA mutation as the cause of an inherited metabolic disorder.
Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells
Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases.
Stimulating the epileptic brain breaks up neural networks to prevent seizures
Reactive neurostimulation reduces seizure frequency by remodeling the brain, and early electrical signatures of this process could be used to accelerate and personalize treatment.
Sizing up a starry night
We gaze up at them, we wish upon them, we even sing about swinging on them.
Vaccine-preventable diseases surge in crisis-hit Venezuela
Vaccine-preventable diseases have not just returned, but surged in crisis hit Venezuela, according to new research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019).
Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes
Comparing 20 instances of celebrity fat-shaming with women's implicit attitudes about weight before and after the event, psychologists from McGill University found that instances of celebrity fat-shaming were associated with an increase in women's implicit negative weight-related attitudes.
Diet during development affects mating habits, insect study shows
An animal's choice of mating partner can be influenced by what it eats during its sexual development, a study of insects has shown.
New study finds simple way to inoculate teens against junk food marketing
A simple and brief intervention can provide lasting protection for adolescents against the harmful effects of food marketing.
Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia
Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well.
CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds
Recently, a research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGDB, CAS), together with Associate Prof.
National poll: Most parents concerned about safety of teens using ride-sharing services
As teens prepare to leave home for college or live on their own in a new city, many may also be using ride-sharing services for the first time -- and that raises safety concerns for many parents -- a new national poll suggests.
Scientists get sly, use deception to fight cancer
In recent years, it's become clear that RNA-binding proteins play a major role in cancer growth.
The history of humanity in your face
The skull and teeth provide a rich library of changes that we can track over time, describing the history of evolution of our species.
Rare but important gene target found in many tumor types, suggesting new therapy possible
A consortium of researchers led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center investigators have completed the largest analysis of a new gene fusion they believe is responsible for development of a wide spectrum of cancer types.
New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light
Scientists from the University of Groningen have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing -- a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes.
Russian scientists alter 3D genome using 'small molecules'
Researchers have discovered that the spatial organization of the genome can be altered using small molecule compounds which are considered as promising anti-cancer drugs.
Tiny fragment of a comet found inside a meteorite
ASU researcher helps team make surprising discovery that gives clues to how solar system formed
Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives
Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that.
RNA transport in neurons -- Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner
A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought.
Breakthrough kidney disease treatment offers hope for hundreds of millions with diabetes worldwide
A new treatment for people with diabetes and kidney disease reduced kidney failure rates by a third, according to a landmark trial.
Moffitt researchers identify mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma
Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of skin cancer, but recent advances in targeted therapies have improved the prognosis for many patients.
Study: Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells
Scientists at the University of Illinois developed new purple corn hybrids with differing combinations of phenols in the pericarp that fight obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance, a new study in mice suggests.
How partisan politics could take a bite out of your wallet
mutual funds maximize client wealth by investing their clients' assets in funds that best match the client's investment strategy (low-risk, short-term, etc.).
Climate change could undermine children's education and development in the tropics
A new study by a University of Maryland researcher published in the April 15, 2019, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prenatal and early childhood years in countries of the global tropics could make it harder for children to attain secondary school education, even for better-off households.
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms.
Synthetic peptide can inhibit toxicity, aggregation of protein in Alzheimer's disease
A team led by researchers at the University of Washington has developed synthetic peptides that target and inhibit the small, toxic protein aggregates that are thought to trigger Alzheimer's disease.
Surgical site infection rates differ by gender for certain procedures
Men and women are at differing risks of developing surgical site infections depending on the type of operation they undergo, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019).
Shocking economics
Understanding economies in times of crises? Modern macroeconomics failed so far.
Light from exotic particle states
In ultra thin materials, exotic bound states of particles can be created which are then converted into light.
Continuing PC vaccine in Kenya at full price cost-effective and could save thousands of lives
Continuing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Kenya after the country transitions away from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, support is highly cost-effective and estimated to save thousands of children's lives, according to new research published in The Lancet Global Health.
Tel Aviv University scientists print first 3D heart using patient's biological materials
In a major medical breakthrough, Tel Aviv University researchers have 'printed' the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials.
Rice advances the art of protein blacksmithing
Rice University biological physicists took inspiration from the mighty blacksmith to refine their computational models of how proteins fold.
Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy
Researchers at the University of Georgia have found colonies of tropical fire ants, native to Florida and coastal Georgia, that thrive with multiple queens and in close proximity to single-queen colonies of the same species.
Princeton scientists discover an interaction that helps cancers spread to bone
A Princeton-led team of researchers have discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer's ability to colonize bone.
A breakthrough in acidic water electrolysis via ruthenium-based catalysts
A recent study from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) makes hydrogen production through water electrolysis easier and more efficient, and allows people to see the great potential of hydrogen as an alternative new energy in the future.
Scanning for cancer treatment
11,000 people are predicted to die from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2019.
Need for social skills helped shape modern human face
As large-brained, short-faced hominins, our faces are different from other, now extinct hominins (such as the Neanderthals) and our closest living relatives (bonobos and chimpanzees), but how and why did the modern human face evolve this way?
Safety-net hospitals fare better under new Medicare reimbursement rules
New Medicare reimbursement rules provide some relief to safety-net hospitals, shifting the burden of financial penalties toward hospitals serving wealthier patient populations, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Examination of adolescent homicides committed by intimate partners
This study used data from a large national surveillance system from 2003 to 2016 to report on adolescent homicides committed by an intimate partner (current or former girlfriend or boyfriend or spouse) and to describe characteristics of the victims, perpetrators and incidents.
Comet fragment discovered inside meteorite gives clues to the origin of the solar system
An international team including researchers from the Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia at the Institute of Space Sciences (Spanish National Research Council-CSIC) has discovered a pristine comet fragment inside a meteorite.
Procedure time proves vital in thrombectomy success
Researchers at MUSC report in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology paper that the current standard of care for stroke should factor in procedure time when considering surgical intervention.
Dementia more preventable in Asia and Latin America
Close to one in two cases of dementia could be preventable in low- to middle-income countries, finds a new UCL study.
Army scientists lead the way to produce tools for engineering biomolecules
Army scientists have discovered how to build novel synthetic biomolecule complexes that they believe are a critical step towards biotemplated advanced materials.
What makes a jellyfish?
Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones.
Peeling back the darkness of M87
Supercomputers at The University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) enabled researchers to confirm the accuracy, and interpret features of, the first-of-its-kind image of a black hole obtained by the Event Horizon Telescope.
Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins
A novel strategy capable of extracting and driving hard-to-reach proteins into water solution where they can be effectively studied using mass spectrometry, a powerful analytical technique, promises a trove of biological insights and, importantly, may help identify therapeutically relevant proteins and provide new disease diagnostic techniques.
Antibiotic resistance gene transmitted between pets at a UK animal hospital
A gene that enables bacteria to be highly resistant to linezolid, an antibiotic that is used as a last resort for treating infections in humans, has been found in bacterial samples from cats and a dog at a small-animal hospital in the UK for the first time.
Drug reduces risk of kidney failure in people with diabetes, study finds
A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease.
Plastic's carbon footprint
From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans.
Precise decoding of breast cancer cells creates new option for treatment
Researchers at the University of Zurich and from IBM Research have investigated the vary-ing composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors.
How does dark play impact the effectiveness of serious video games?
A new study has shown that allowing ''dark play'' in a serious video game intended to practice skills transferable to a real-life setting does not impact the game's effectiveness.
Necrophagy: A means of survival in the Dead Sea
Researchers from UNIGE and Lyon have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea.
Successful research papers cite young references
When it comes to publishing the most impactful scientific research and identifying the best up-and-coming research paths, it takes one to know one.
New report examines the safety of using dispersants in oil spill clean ups
A multi-disciplinary team of scientists has issued a series of findings and recommendations on the safety of using dispersal agents in oil spill clean-up efforts in a report published this month by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.
New study reveals 'silence' around suicide in young people
Mental health professionals treating children and young people with suicidal feelings should refer to 'suicide' explicitly to ensure they feel listened to, according to new research.
Meteoroid strikes eject precious water from moon
Streams of meteoroids striking the Moon infuse the thin lunar atmosphere with a short-lived water vapor, according to researchers using data from NASA's LADEE spacecraft.
TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet
A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world.
Resolving sex differences in psychiatric disorder risk
Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy display autism- and schizophrenia-like behaviors, according to a new follow-up study published in eNeuro.
A new bacteria-killing weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance
In a bid to boost the arsenal available against antibiotic resistance, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid successfully programmed a bacterial genetic structure to make it capable of specifically killing multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria without also destroying bacteria that are beneficial to the body.
Bridging the gap between radar meteorology/hydrology/engineering and weather prediction
Accurate weather prediction depends on a fundamental understanding of storm dynamics and cloud microphysics and their representation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, as well the optimal use of high-resolution multi-parameter measurements.
Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets
Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets in societies where state and religion is all-powerful.
Brain marker for angry dreams
Researchers have identified a pattern of brain activity that predicts anger experienced during dreaming, according to a new study of healthy adults published in JNeurosci.
Many heart attack patients may be needlessly treated in ICU, study suggests
Many patients who suffer a type of heart attack known as an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are treated in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite a relatively low risk of developing a complication requiring ICU care, according to a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
New gene variant is even more resistant to hospital antiseptic
A team of investigators has discovered a new, more powerful variant on an antimicrobial resistance gene common among Staphylococcus species.
Fentanyl deaths up 122 percent in West Virginia, say WVU researchers
An interdisciplinary research team -- involving the WVU School of Pharmacy, the WVU School of Public Health and the West Virginia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner -- analyzed data and found that fentanyl deaths are up 122 percent in the state.
Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers
Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists.
China, India economic development key to achieving MDG for safe drinking water
Research led by The University of Tokyo examined why the United Nations Millennium Development Goal for access to safe drinking water was achieved when all previous attempts had failed.
New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever
Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth.
New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain
Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.
Statins safe for preventing cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis patients
Results from a large clinical trial indicate that patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits from statins as other individuals, without additional risks.
Abundance of information narrows our collective attention span
New study in Nature Communications finds increasingly narrow peaks of collective attention over time, supporting a 'social acceleration' occurring across different domains.
Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters
Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became ''misregulated'' by the disease.
Dopamine regulates sex differences in worms
Dopamine is responsible for sex-specific variations in common behaviors, finds a study of worm movements published in JNeurosci.
Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast
The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar.
This gene could play a major role in reducing brain swelling after stroke
Inflammation gone awry in the brain due to stroke, head injury or infection causes damage; in a lab model of stroke, a particular gene tamped down swelling.
Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras
In a recent study, we have developed a novel graphene-enabled photodetector that operates at room temperature, is highly sensitive, very fast, has a wide dynamic range and covers a broad range of THz frequencies.
Google searches reveal popular bird species
Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest.
In lung disease, crackling and wheezing can be more than just a sign of sickness
Doctors know they're the sounds of lung problems, but it turns out they might be more than symptoms--crackling and wheezing could be the sounds of a disease progressing, a University of Michigan researcher has found.
Could climate change cause infertility?
A number of plant and animal species could find it increasingly difficult to reproduce if climate change worsens and global temperatures become more extreme -- a stark warning highlighted by new scientific research.
Cell biology: The complexity of division by two
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.
Assessment tool of children's environments can help predict optimal development outcomes
A paper published by Darcia Narvaez and her colleagues at the Notre Dame Family Life Project in Sage Open highlights how taking a snapshot of a young child's experience over a week, as reported by a parent, is predictive of child outcomes.
Venezuela estimated to have had 1 million new malaria infections in 2018
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) says that final estimates for 2018 could show more than 1 million cases of malaria in Venezuela alone.
Sniffing pleasant odors may decrease cigarette craving
Smokers who are trying to quit may not always have to reach for a piece of nicotine gum to stave off a craving.
Decoding cancer's molecular signature
New algorithm successfully identifies patients with a tumor-fueling DNA repair defect found in multiple cancers and treatable with a common cancer drug.
'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits
Scientists in Cambridge and London have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumour - including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumours by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke.
Predictability limit: Scientists find bounds of weather forecasting
In the future, weather forecasts that provide storm warnings and help us plan our daily lives could come up to five days sooner before reaching the limits of numerical weather prediction, scientists said.
Scientists use eBird data to propose optimal bird conservation plan
A new paper published today in the journal Nature Communications shows a blueprint for conserving enough habitat to protect the populations of almost one-third of the warblers, orioles, tanagers, and other birds that migrate among the Americas throughout the year.
Transgender youth faced with tough decision to freeze sperm or eggs
Transitioning transgender adolescents are forced to consider whether or not they pursue fertility preservation.
Indicators of despair rising among Gen X-ers entering middle age
Indicators of despair -- depression, suicidal ideation, drug use and alcohol abuse -- are rising among Americans in their late 30s and early 40s across most demographic groups, according to new Vanderbilt University research.
Developing a vaccine against Nipah virus
Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family.
FDA added sugar label could be a cost-effective way to improve health, generate savings
The FDA's mandatory added sugar labeling policy for packaged foods and beverages could generate important health gains and cost-savings for the healthcare system and society, according to a new modeling study led by researchers from Tufts University and the University of Liverpool.
Sharks more vulnerable than originally thought, new research shows
New study reveals in excess of 2.5 million sharks are caught annually in the South West Indian Ocean - 73% more than officially reported.
To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans
When it comes to stem cell management, all flowering plants work to maintain the same status quo.

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#521 The Curious Life of Krill
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