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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 19, 2019


Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation
Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy.
Association of quitting smoking during pregnancy, risk of preterm birth
This study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth.
A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education
On April 3, 2019, researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute published a framework for using new genome sequences as a training resource for undergraduates interested in learning genome annotation.
Researchers report high performance solid-state sodium-ion battery
Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages.
Video plus brochure helps patients make lung cancer scan decision
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in addition to an informational brochure increased patients' knowledge and reduced conflicted feelings about whether to undergo the scan more than the informational brochure alone, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Commentary: Modifications to Medicare rules could support care innovation for dialysis
Public health researchers suggest adjustments to recently proposed rule changes on how Medicare pays for dialysis services.
Study examines privacy policies, data sharing of popular apps for depression, smoking cessation
This study looked at the privacy practices of popular apps for depression and smoking cessation.
Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births
Dartmouth-led study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth.
Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Nine years ago tomorrow -- April 20, 2010 -- crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history.
Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization
A team of scientists led by Prof. FU Chunxiang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology completed the identification of bm5 mutant.
Study: Opioid dose variability may be a risk factor for opioid overdose
Patients prescribed opioid pain medications whose doses varied over time were three times more likely to experience an overdose than patients prescribed stable opioid doses, according to an observational study from Kaiser Permanente published today in JAMA Network Open.
Light, physical activity reduces brain aging
Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging.
Marijuana users weigh less, defying the munchies
New evidence from Michigan State University suggests that those who smoke cannabis, or marijuana, weigh less compared to adults who don't.
Thermodynamic magic enables cooling without energy consumption
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply.
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication.
Weapons trade reveals a darker side to dark web
Debates over gun regulations make headlines across the world, but there's an underground operation for weapons that has drawn very little attention -- until now.
Plants are also stressed out
What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope.
IMF's structural adjustment programs slash bureaucratic quality in developing countries
Bureaucratic quality in developing countries is endangered by the structural adjustment programs imposed by the international financial institutions, a paper by Bocconi's Alexander Kentikelenis and colleagues, in the American Journal of Sociology, states.
Airbnb's explosive growth jolts hotel industry's bottom line
New research finds Airbnb is taking an increasing share of business away from the hotel industry.
Pharmacy closures associated with declines in cardiovascular medication adherence
How pharmacy closures are associated with declines in cardiovascular medication adherence for statins, β-blockers and oral anticoagulants among adults 50 or older was the focus of this analysis of prescription claims.
On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours
A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours.
People with heart disease at risk when pharmacies close
New research shows that when pharmacies close, people stop taking widely used heart medications -- like statins, beta-blockers and oral anticoagulants -- that have known cardiovascular and survival benefits.
Study tracks unpredictability of intimate partner violence
In situations of intimate partner violence, not knowing what will come next is sometimes a stronger predictor of a woman's health outcomes than violence frequency and severity, research at UT Health San Antonio suggests.
Collecting the right quantity of evidence: How the brain makes a difficult decision
New research conducted in the Cognitive Neuroscience group of SISSA shows that a perceptual decision - recognizing an object and taking the appropriate action - is triggered as soon as the brain's processing networks accumulate the exact right quantity of sensory information.
Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes
Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023, but their use in heavy-duty applications such as electric vehicles is limited due to factors such as lengthy charge and discharge cycles.
Russian blue chips prove their pricing potential
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and London Business School have carried out research into the dynamics of the prices for Russian companies' stocks and depositary receipts.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...