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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 23, 2019


Electronic health records decision support reduces inappropriate use of GI test
Programming a hospital's electronic health record system (EHR) to provide information on appropriate use of a costly gastrointestinal panel and to block unnecessary orders reduced inappropriate testing by 46% and saved up to $168,000 over 15 months, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.
KAIST unveils the hidden control architecture of brain networks
A KAIST research team identified the intrinsic control architecture of brain networks.
Experiences of 'ultimate reality' or 'God' confer lasting benefits to mental health
In a survey of thousands of people who reported having experienced personal encounters with God, Johns Hopkins researchers report that more than two-thirds of self-identified atheists shed that label after their encounter, regardless of whether it was spontaneous or while taking a psychedelic.
WSU researchers see health effects across generations from popular weed killer
Washington State University researchers have found a variety of diseases and other health problems in the second- and third-generation offspring of rats exposed to glyphosate, the world's most popular weed killer.
Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia
Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children.
New study compiles gulf of maine seasonal wildlife timing shifts
Many researchers and amateur naturalists track dates for the first robin or pond ice-out; such records offer data on timing of plant and animal life cycle events known as phenology.
Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists
University of Copenhagen researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information.
How lifestyle affects our genes
In the past decade, knowledge of how lifestyle affects our genes, a research field called epigenetics, has grown exponentially.
Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer
In research appearing in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature Communications, Karen Andersen, Samira Kiani and their colleagues at Arizona State University describe a method of rendering the gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 'immunosilent,' potentially allowing the editing and repair of genes to be accomplished reliably and stealthily.
New Cochrane Review investigates the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine.
TOS president-elect co-authors study on genetic test for obesity
President-elect of The Obesity Society (TOS) Lee M. Kaplan, MD, PhD, FTOS, has co-authored a new study that describes a newly developed genetic test that can identify newborns at the highest risk of developing severe obesity, the Society announced today.
Dengue mosquito is Queensland's biggest threat for spreading Zika virus
Researchers in Australia at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have found that the dengue fever mosquito common to north and central Queensland poses the greatest danger of spreading the Zika virus in Australia.
Future mmWave networks set to deliver the best features of high and low frequencies
Future high-speed communication networks based on millimeter-wave (30-300GHz) technology will be more robust and efficient in delivering extremely high speed, high quality video, and multimedia content and services thanks to the results of a ground-breaking research project.
Texting to improve health outcomes for people with schizophrenia
Texting patients with schizophrenia and their lay health supporters in a resource-poor community setting is more effective than a free-medicine program alone in improving medication adherence and reducing relapses and re-hospitalizations, according to a study published April 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Wenjie Gong of Central South University in Hunan, China, Dong (Roman) Xu of Sun Yat-sen University Global Health Institute, Guangdong, China and colleagues.
Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds.
Advances in cryo-EM materials may aid cancer and biomedical research
Cryogenic-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has been a game changer in the field of medical research, but the substrate, used to freeze and view samples under a microscope, has not advanced much in decades.
Study finds improved WIC food packages reduced obesity risk for children
A decade ago, the federal government overhauled nutrition standards for food packages in its primary food assistance program for young mothers and their children.
New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care.
Number of women who aren't physically active enough is high and growing
Using data from a national survey representing more than 19 million US women with established cardiovascular disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that more than half of women with the condition do not do enough physical activity and those numbers have grown over the last decade.
New approach to repair fetal membranes may prevent birth complications
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and University College London have developed a new approach to repair defects in fetal membranes which could prevent life-long medical conditions and disabilities associated with preterm birth.
Army publishes new findings to support soldier training
Researchers recently demonstrated that people's attitudes about avoiding negative outcomes versus achieving positive outcomes is related to how their performance changes in response to gamified feedback during simulation-based training exercises.
Study unravels mystery of antimicrobial frog secretions
Japanese scientists including researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and Yokohama National University have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties.
Study: Playing video games generally not harmful to boys' social development
A new longitudinal study conducted in Norway looked at how playing video games affects the social skills of 6- to 12-year-olds.
Mobility may predict elderly heart attack survivors' repeat hospital stays
Standing up from a seated position and walking across a room may help predict which heart attack survivors over age 75 will require repeat hospital stays within a month.
Patients with cancer seen in the emergency department have better outcomes at original hospital
Patients with cancer requiring emergency department care had better outcomes at their original hospital or a cancer centre hospital than at alternative general hospitals, found research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
How drug-resistant E. coli succeeds as a public health menace
In a study published this week, an international team of researchers conducted high-resolution analyses of more than 850 drug-resistant genomes to identify survival strategies employed by drug-resistant Escherichia coli clones.
New rules for lung transplants lead to unintended consequences
A recent policy change in allocating donor lungs has had several unintended consequences, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes
In multiple myeloma, Ig lambda translocations may indicate poor outcomes and resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide.
BU, Johnson & Johnson Innovation alliance: Immune system boost could prevent lung cancer
BU, Johnson & Johnson Innovation alliance: why an immune system boost could prevent lung cancer
Researchers devise a progression risk-based classification for patients with AWM
Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have devised a risk model for determining whether patients with AWM have a low, intermediate, or high risk of developing symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia.
Minor sleep loss can put your job at risk
Just 16 minutes shaved off your regular sleep routine can dramatically impact job performance the next day.
Scratching the skin primes the gut for allergic reactions to food, mouse study suggests
Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells -- immune cells involved in allergic reactions -- in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice.
Unblocking arteries after heart attack may be lifesaver for older patients
Among heart attack patients 75 years and older, the oldest of those patients were less likely to receive a procedure to open blocked arteries than younger patients.
Calcium deficiency in cells due to ORAI1 gene mutation leads to damaged tooth enamel
A mutation in the ORAI1 gene -- studied in a human patient and mice -- leads to a loss of calcium in enamel cells and results in defective dental enamel mineralization, finds a study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.
How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease
Researchers in Dresden, Germany, have studied the regenerative capacity of zebrafish brain in single cell resolution with the aim of developing novel strategies against Alzheimer's.
How much time do Americans spend sitting?
Americans spend more time sitting. Total time spent sitting increased about an hour per day to 8.2 hours for adolescents and 6.4 hours for adults in 2007-2016 in this analysis of nationally representative survey data.
NASA catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth near Aldabra
Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the formation of Tropical Storm Kenneth in the Southern Indian Ocean.
Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia
Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird species in the Wakatobi Archipelago of Sulawesi, Indonesia.
'Longevity gene' responsible for more efficient DNA repair
University of Rochester researchers found that the gene sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is responsible for more efficient DNA repair in species with longer lifespans.
Scientists define the role for a rare, influential set of bone marrow cells
Researchers have defined the roles of various cells in the bone marrow that are thought to control the fate of the nearly half million blood cells that develop there each day.
Bacteria reveal strong individuality when navigating a maze
Researchers from ETH Zurich demonstrate that genetically identical cells exhibit differing responses in their motility towards chemical attractants.
Study: Mediterranean diet deters overeating
Eat as much as you want and not gain weight?
Scientists discover how 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut
A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists led by the University of Birmingham have discovered.
The scientists developed a new method for improving the efficiency of air purifiers
Clean air is something that we are continuously proud of in our little Estonia, and it has been called, partly in jest, one of the most important export articles of Estonia.
Three-antibiotic cocktail clears 'persister' Lyme bacteria in mouse study
A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that a slow-growing variant form of Lyme bacteria caused severe symptoms in a mouse model.
To test the munchies, researchers offer a choice: chips or an orange?
Results underscore an important issue as more states legalize marijuana: the increased need for tailored nutrition education as the population of pot-smokers grows.
Seven seconds of Spiderman viewing yields a 20% phobia symptom reduction
As the Marvel Avenger Endgame premieres in movie theaters this week, researchers have published a new article in Frontiers in Psychology which reveals that exposure to Spiderman and Antman movie excerpts decreases symptoms of spider and ant phobias, respectively.
Scientists propose new theory on Alzheimer's, amyloid connection
'Is amyloid precursor protein the mastermind behind Alzheimer's or is it just an accomplice?' Researchers devised a multi-functional reporter for amyloid precursor protein and tracked its localization and mobility, noticing a strange association between the protein and cholesterol that resides in the cell membrane of synapses.
Biologists design new molecules to help stall lung cancer
University of Texas at Dallas scientists have demonstrated that the growth rate of the majority of lung cancer cells relates directly to the availability of a crucial oxygen-metabolizing molecule called heme.
Is state medicaid expansion associated with changes in low birth weight, preterm births?
This observational study examined whether state Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was associated with changes in low birth weight and preterm birth both overall and by race/ethnicity.
More evidence that blood tests can detect the risk of Alzheimer's
A new study confirms that a simple blood test can reveal whether there is accelerating nerve cell damage in the brain.
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Our actions are driven by 'internal states' such as anxiety, stress or thirst -- which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors.
Simple and fast method for radiolabelling antibodies against breast cancer
Radioactive antibodies that target cancer cells are used for medical diagnostics with PET imaging or for targeted radioimmunotherapy.
Despite health warnings, Americans still sit too much
Most Americans continue to sit for prolonged periods despite public health messages that such inactivity increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to a major new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms
Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr. Golnoosh Torabian and Dr.
A new clue in the mystery of ALS, frontotemporal dementia
Michigan Medicine (University of Michigan) researchers identify a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative conditions ALS and frontotemporal dementia, using animal models.
The buzz about bumble bees isn't good
While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees.
People with happy spouses may live longer
Research suggests that having a happy spouse leads to a longer marriage, and now study results show that it's associated with a longer life, too.
Holocene changes of landforms and environments in the eastern portion of Asian mid-latitude deserts
Based on careful field investigation over decades and geochronological and paleoenvironmental data, Professor Xiaoping Yang of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou and his collaborators from several institutions jointly studied the Holocene histories of the sand seas and sandy lands in the eastern portion of the desert belt in northern China.
Scientists create largest collection of coral reef maps ever made
A study from scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation and the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science offers a new way to accurately map coral reefs using a combination of Earth-orbiting satellites and field observations.
Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits
From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year.
Study: Drugs reprogram genes in breast tumors to prevent endocrine resistance
Treating breast tumors with two cancer drugs simultaneously may prevent endocrine resistance by attacking the disease along two separate gene pathways, scientists at the University of Illinois found in a new study.
Socioeconomic deprivation increases risk of developing chronic kidney disease in England
A study of 1.4 million adults in England has found that the most socioeconomically deprived are 68% more likely to develop advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) than the least deprived, so experience poorer health outcomes and quality of life.
NUS researchers identified new biomarkers associated with 'chemobrain'
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have identified new biomarkers related to the cognitive impairment associated with cancer known as chemobrain.
Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees
The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways.
New way to 'see' objects accelerates the future of self-driving cars
Researchers have discovered a simple, cost-effective, and accurate new method for equipping self-driving cars with the tools needed to perceive 3D objects in their path.
Researchers reveal how bacteria can adapt to resist treatment by antibiotics
In a joint collaboration, researchers from Denmark and Switzerland have shown that bacteria produce a specific stress molecule, divide more slowly, and thus save energy when they are exposed to antibiotics.
Shining light on rare nerve tumors illuminates a fresh path for fighting cancer
A discovery about the rare nerve disease NF2 suggests that targeting mechanical signaling between cells could become another weapon against many forms of cancer.
Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack
The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue.
Researchers create artificial mother-of-pearl using bacteria
A University of Rochester biologist invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria.
CU School of Medicine scientist helps create international database of women scientists
A database of women scientists that was created a year ago by a team led by a CU School of Medicine postdoctoral fellow has grown to list more than 7,500 women and is featured in an article published today in PLOS Biology.
Study shines light on safety of deworming programs
A new study has identified no major differences between the microbiomes of people infected with roundworm or hookworm and uninfected peers.
Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days.
Pre-op daily life disability may predict poor outcome after hip replacement
A new Johns Hopkins Medicine study looking at medical records of more than 43,000 US adults with hip-joint damaging osteoarthritis suggests that those who cannot perform daily activities independently before total hip replacement surgery are more likely to have poorer outcomes after surgery.
When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts
Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments.
Thiazide diuretics reduced the risk of fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease
The use of thiazide diuretics was associated with a decreased risk of low energy fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
New chemical tool to block endocytosis in plants identified
Plant cells absorb many important substances through a process called endocytosis.
Obesity linked with differences in form and structure of the brain
Researchers using sophisticated MRI technology have found that higher levels of body fat are associated with differences in the brain's form and structure, including smaller volumes of gray matter, according to a new study.
Majority of US states restrict decision-making for incapacitated pregnant women
Half of all US states have laws on the books that invalidate a pregnant woman's advance directive if she becomes incapacitated, and a majority of states don't disclose these restrictions in advance directive forms, according to a study by physicians and bioethicists at Mayo Clinic and other institutions.
New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones
A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.
Water walking -- The new mode of rock skipping
Utah State University's Splash Lab not only reveals the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water, but it also lays the foundation for the future design of water-walking drones.
Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change
A new study conducted by scientists at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and the California Academy of Sciences revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following a bleaching event.
Air pollution poses risks for childhood cancer survivors
Study by Huntsman Cancer Institute researchers finds air pollution significantly increases the risk of hospitalizations for young cancer survivors.
Plant signals trigger remarkable bacterial transformation
Cycad plant roots release signals into the soil that triggers the transformation of bacteria into its motile form, helping them move to the plant roots and establish a symbiotic partnership.
Some women could be more susceptible to PTSD than others, according to new study
Childhood trauma is known to increase the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder in adulthood, especially for women, but the biological reasons for this correlation remain largely unknown.
Women underreport prevalence and intensity of their own snoring
A new study of adults who were referred for evaluation of a suspected sleep disorder suggests that women tend to underreport snoring and underestimate its loudness.
Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy
Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth's surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change -- and have a multi-trillion dollar impact on the world economy.
COPD and type 2 diabetes
COPD and type 2 diabetes are two highly prevalent global health conditions associated with high mortality and morbidity.
Acupuncture equals disease prevention say new studies
Well-recognized for its therapeutic effects, acupuncture is increasingly being appreciated for its ability to promote wellness and contribute to the prevention of a broad range of conditions.
Simple sea anemones not so simple after all
New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics.
How the body protects itself from type 2 diabetes
A specific group of white blood cells, termed 'regulatory T cells', keeps the immune system in balance and suppresses its activity to protect the body against autoimmune diseases.
Otago's atom interaction discovery valuable for future quantum technologies
By breaking with conventionality, University of Otago physicists have opened up new research and technology opportunities involving the basic building block of the world -- atoms.
UNH scientists find auroral 'speed bumps' are more complicated
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire Space Science Center find that 'speed bumps' in space, which can slow down satellites orbiting closer to Earth, are more complex than originally thought.
When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?
While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.
Study: Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors
There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian finches -- a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads, and yellow heads.
Girls and boys on autism spectrum tell stories differently, could explain 'missed diagnosis' in girls
A new study from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) examined differences in the way girls and boys on the autism spectrum used certain types of words during storytelling.
Cannabis addiction influenced by genetic makeup
Some people may be more genetically prone to cannabis addiction, finds a new UCL-led study.
Quality of laser beam shaping can be enhanced at no extra cost
Researchers from Osaka University developed a technique for improving accuracy of laser beam shaping and wavefront obtained by conventional methods with no additional cost by optimizing virtual phase grating.
Strongly agree: It's time to test the Likert scale
Researchers often tweak the number of response options in the traditional five-point Likert Scale with little empirical justification for doing so.
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely.
Revealed: The secret superpower that makes C. difficile so deadly
A new discovery about dangerous C. difficile diarrhea has identified a new way that the bacteria -- and possibly others like it -- cause severe disease.
Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs
The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics.
Good mousekeeping: En suite bathroom makes for happier mice
Mice have a strong preference to nest away from their own waste, UBC research has found.
A new window into macaque brain connections
Researchers can now see how the two sides of the living brain mirror each other thanks to a new combination-imaging technique.
Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home
MIT researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most prevalent bacteria found in humans' large intestines.
Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay
Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent.
Rare disease gives new insight into regulatory T cell function
An international study led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden provides new insights into the regulatory T cells' role in protecting against autoimmune disease.
Low socioeconomic position associated with worse care at the end of life
In high-income countries, people with low socioeconomic position are more likely to receive poor quality end of life care and die in hospital, according to a large meta-analysis by Joanna Davies of King's College London, UK, and colleagues, published this week in PLOS Medicine.
New studies highlight challenge of meeting Paris Agreement climate goals
New research highlights the 'incredible challenge' of reaching the Paris Agreement without intense action and details the extreme temperatures parts of the planet will suffer if countries fail to reduce emissions.
Atomic beams shoot straighter via cascading silicon peashooters
Atomic beams conjure fantasies of gigantic Space Force canons. But there are real tiny atomic beams that shoot out of newly engineered collimators, a kind of tiny silicon peashooter, that could land in handheld devices.
Which car crashes cause traumatic brain injury?
Motor vehicle crashes are one of the most common causes of TBI-related emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths.
CBD reduces impairment caused by cannabis
The more cannabidiol (CBD) in a strain of cannabis, the lower the impairment to brain function, finds a new UCL-led brain imaging study.
Scientists develop low-cost energy-efficient materials
An international team of scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' (NUST MISIS), Tianjin University (China), as well as from Japan and the United States has developed new energy-efficient iron-based alloys which combine high mechanical and magnetic properties with low cost and open up new opportunities for industry.
How light triggers brain activity
Optogenetics uses light to control brain processes. It is based on light-controlled proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2, an ion channel that opens when it's exposed to light, thus activating cellular processes.
Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles
While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers at the University of Illinois used a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.
Devil rays may have unknown birthing zone
The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays tangled in fishing nets in a village along Mexico's Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters, a Duke University study suggests.
Quantum gas turns supersolid
Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium.
Time-restricted eating shows benefits for blood glucose
By restricting the time period during which they could eat, researchers have seen promising results for controlling blood glucose levels in men at risk of type 2 diabetes.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...