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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 25, 2019


Haunted by the past
Good sleepers literally can settle cringe-worthy mistakes and embarrassing blunders in their head as neutralized memories, whereas people with insomnia were not able to do so.
Researchers verify new method of HIV transmission among injection drug users and effective prevention technique
New studies from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University have found for the first time that HIV can be transmitted through the sharing of equipment used to prepare drugs before injection and that a simple intervention - heating the equipment with a cigarette lighter for 10 seconds - can destroy the HIV virus, preventing that transmission.
Many stroke patients not screened for osteoporosis, despite known risks
Many stroke survivors have an increased risk of osteoporosis, falls or breaks when compared to healthy people.
Mystery of the universe's expansion rate widens with new Hubble data
The universe is getting bigger every second -- but how fast?
How to take the 'petro' out of the petrochemicals industry
University of Toronto Engineering researchers chart a course for how an alternative technology -- renewable electrosynthesis -- could usher in a more sustainable chemical industry, and ultimately enable us to leave much more oil and gas in the ground.
Six factors may predict invasive breast cancer recurrence after DCIS diagnosis
Six factors were associated with invasive recurrence of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to data from a meta-analysis.
New technique uses power anomalies to ID malware in embedded systems
Researchers have developed a technique for detecting types of malware that use a system's architecture to thwart traditional security measures.
Biomimicry of basic instinct
Chemical engineers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering have recreated collaboration and competition responses within a microchamber environment of microscopic particles, sheets, and catalysts, effectively mimicking responses of feeding, fighting, and fleeing.
Holy Pleistocene Batman, the answer's in the cave
Examining a 3-meter stack of bat feces has shed light on the landscape of the ancient continent of Sundaland.
College-age males at bars, parties more likely to be sexually aggressive
College men who frequently attend parties or go to bars are more likely to be sexually aggressive compared to those who don't, Washington State University researchers have found.
Dermcidin may play role in the pathogenesis of skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa
A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences have identified the protein dermcidin as having a potential role in the pathogenesis of the chronic skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa.
Veterans suffer from 'culture shock' when returning to university
War veterans experience such extreme 'culture shock' at university, that they struggle to communicate their feelings and begin a destructive cycle of silence, according to a new study.
Drug overdoses in young people on the rise
In American adolescents and young adults, death rates from drug poisoning, particularly from opioids, have sharply increased over the last 10 years, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
Teens prefer harm reduction messaging on substance use
For many parents, talking to their children about substance use is like navigating a field of landmines.
UBC Okanagan engineers make injectable tissues a reality
A simple injection that can help regrow damaged tissue has long been the dream of physicians and patients alike.
Bridge over coupled waters: Scientists 3D-print all-liquid 'lab on a chip'
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have 3D-printed an all-liquid ''lab on a chip'' that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications - from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.
Rehabilitation psychologists: #SayTheWord disability
A group of female rehabilitation psychologists with disabilities highlight the need for clinicians, educators and disability allies to normalize the word 'disability.'
Blood cancer's Achilles' heel opens door for new treatments
New findings about an aggressive form of leukemia could aid the development of novel drugs to treat the condition.
The FASEB Journal: Pericytes may improve muscle recovery
Extended periods of limb immobilization -- whether from long-term bed rest, casting, spaceflight, or other circumstances -- can reduce skeletal muscle mass and strength to the extent that recovery is delayed or never achieved.
Place-based management can protect coral reefs in a changing climate
Scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa apply new computer models to identify where cesspool conversion and marine conservation efforts will minimize human impacts on coral reefs.
New lens system for brighter, sharper diffraction images
Now, a group of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new and improved version of electron diffraction at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) that offers advanced and unique experimental instrumentation for studying particle acceleration to researchers from all around the world.
Urging party supporters to sign up for postal votes is ineffective
Research carried out by the University of Kent and Kings College London (KCL) into a common postal vote recruitment tactic found it to be ineffective in persuading people to change from visiting polling stations to vote.
Tracking charge carriers in the molecular crystal at organic pn junction
In conventional organic solar cells, the electrons exhibit their particle-nature and need to jump between organic molecules in the cell.
Working to advance radiation therapy for children with cancer
Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles use novel software to increase quality assurance in radiation therapy.
Analyzing colon cancer proteins and genes uncovers new potential treatments
Analyzing both the entire set of genes and all the proteins produced by colon cancer tissues from patient samples has revealed a more comprehensive view of the tumor that points at novel cancer biological mechanisms and possible new therapeutic strategies.
33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights
Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows.
Rates of physician-patient discussions about lung cancer screening very low and declining
Low rates of physician-patient discussions about lung cancer screening have declined further since 2012 and were not associated with current smokers' intents or attempts to quit smoking.
Ocean winds and waves have slightly strengthened over last three decades
Over the last three decades, wind speeds and wave heights have increased, even if just a little, in most places around the world, with the greatest increases occurring in the Southern Ocean.
Quality improvement in emergency surgery shows no difference in patient survival
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London studied the effectiveness of one of the largest ever national quality improvement programmes in the National Health Service (NHS) and found no improvement in patient survival.
The Lancet: Peanut allergy oral immunotherapy increases allergic reactions, compared with avoidance or placebo
A systematic review including 12 studies with more than 1,000 patients who were followed for a year finds that, compared with allergen avoidance or placebo, current oral immunotherapy treatments result in a large increase in anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions, rather than preventing them as intended.
Bosses who put their followers first can boost their business
Companies would do well to tailor training and recruitment measures to encourage managers who have empathy, integrity and are trustworthy -- because they can improve productivity, according to new research from the University of Exeter Business School.
Two birds, one stone: Drug combo may prove effective against second type of leukemia
Researchers tested to see if arsenic trioxide (ATO) was effective in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in in both the mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in human AML cells in the lab, and determined that the combination proved 'powerfully and exquisitely effective' against a subset of AML.
Songbird-body changes that allow migration may have human health implications
Songbirds that pack on as much as 50 percent of their body weight before migrating and that sleep very little, exhibit altered immune system and tissue-repair function during the journey, which may hold implications for human health, according to Penn State researchers.
Researchers discover surprising quantum effect in hard disk drive material
Argonne scientists have further explored a new effect that enhances their ability to control the direction of electron spin in certain materials.
Researchers detail marine viruses from pole to pole
New research provides the most complete account to date of the viruses that impact the world's oceans, increasing the number of known virus populations tenfold.
It's OK to indulge once in a while: The body adapts to occasional short-term overeating
Overeating has been found to impair blood sugar (glucose) control and insulin levels.
The glass half-full: How optimism can bias prognosis in serious illness
A new study in the journal Psycho-Oncology, details how a seriously ill patient's optimism can impact a clinician's survival prognosis in palliative care conversations, impacting end-of-life decision-making and potentially, quality of life in the end-of-life setting.
Higher out-of-pocket costs threaten universal health coverage in 'missing middle' nations
One in six countries is expected to have substantially high out-of-pocket spending as a proportion of total health expenditures by 2050, according to a new scientific study.
One in 7 Washington State drivers with children in the car recently used marijuana
According to a roadside survey conducted in Washington State, 14.1% of drivers with children in the car -- nearly one in seven -- tested positive for THC, the principal psychoactive compound in marijuana.
Pole-to-pole study of ocean life identifies nearly 200,000 marine viruses
An international team has conducted the first-ever global survey of the ecological diversity of viruses in the oceans during expeditions aboard a single sailboat.
Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots
A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition.
Comfort food leads to more weight gain during stress
Australian researchers have discovered a new molecular pathway in the brain that triggers more weight gain in times of stress.
Individual nutrition shows benefits in hospital patients
Individualized nutrition not only causes hospital patients to consume more protein and calories, but also improves clinical treatment outcomes.
p62 and Nrf2 are essential for exercise-mediated enhancement of antioxidant protein in muscle
Regular exercise prevents oxidative stress-induced muscle wasting, at least partially by improving the antioxidant defense system.
Ice-proof coating for big structures relies on a 'beautiful demonstration of mechanics'
A new class of coatings that sheds ice effortlessly from even large surfaces has moved researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines and other large structures.
Integrated approaches to natural resource management key to Canada's continued prosperity
A new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) finds that conventional methods of natural resource management haven't kept pace with the scale and complexity of 21st century problems.
Maximizing conservation benefits
Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe.
IAS researchers detect evidence of 6 new binary black hole mergers within LVC data
Scholars at the Institute for Advanced Study recently submitted a paper announcing the discovery of six new binary black hole mergers, which exceed the detection thresholds defined by the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration.
Human-caused climate change played limited role in Beijing's 2013 'airpocalypse'
Although the particulate matter that filled the winter skies resulted from both human and natural emissions, a new Northwestern University study concludes that human-caused climate change played only a minor role in the air's stagnation.
Exercise activates memory neural networks in older adults
A new University of Maryland School of Public Health study of healthy older adults shows that just one session of exercise increased activation in the brain circuits associated with memory -- including the hippocampus -- which shrinks with age and is the brain region attacked first in Alzheimer's disease.
Preventing collapse after catastrophe
As the impacts of climate change escalate, ecosystems will likely undergo events that will disrupt entire populations.
Healthy aging entails reorganization of function in prefrontal brain areas
Researchers from HSE University and York University have become the first to analyze the results of 82 functional neuroimaging studies on working memory mechanisms in different adult age groups.
How to get rid of that skunk smell? (video)
Skunks are nocturnal animals that prefer to keep to themselves.
Accounting for ice-earth feedbacks at finer scale suggests slower glacier retreat
Accounting for the way the Antarctic ice sheet interacts with the solid earth below -- an important but previously poorly captured phenomena -- reveals that ice sheet collapse events may be delayed for several decades, at this major ice structure.
Study reveals massive ecological and economic impacts of woody weed invasion in Ethiopia
Dr. Urs Schaffner, who is supervising lead author Hailu Shiferaw for his Ph.D. studies, contributed to the Science of the Total Environment published research which shows that the devastating Prosopis was a major reason for losses in annual ecosystem service values in Afar region estimated at US $602 million in just 31 years.
MRC researchers discover how eating feeds into the body clock
The Medical Research Council (MRC)-funded study, published today in the journal Cell, is the first to identify insulin as a primary signal that helps communicate the timing of meals to the cellular clocks located across our body, commonly known as the body clock.
Conflicting laws may keep contaminated needles in circulation, add to hep-C cases
A recent study led by Steve Davis, a researcher in the WVU School of Public Health, suggests fear of arrest is a formidable barrier to getting clean needles and disposing of used ones safely.
Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale.
Lung cancer under-recognized in people who have never smoked
Lung cancer in people who have never smoked is more common than most people think, and on the rise.
How to combine 'leg day' with running
James Cook University scientists in Australia say they have the solution for a problem gym-goers have when they combine endurance and weight training.
Global malaria spending $2 billion short of WHO target, stifling progress
A first-of-its-kind study reveals malaria spending in 2016 totaled $4.3 billion globally, far short of the annual funding target of $6.6 billion set by the World Health Organization.
New method proposed for studying hydrodynamic behavior of electrons in graphene
By studying how electrons in two-dimensional graphene can literally act like a liquid, researchers have paved the way for further research into a material that has the potential to enable future electronic computing devices that outpace silicon transistors.
Caffeine gives solar cells an energy boost
Scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Solargiga Energy in China have discovered that caffeine can help make a promising alternative to traditional solar cells more efficient at converting light to electricity.
Dengue research in the Philippines evolving over time
Communicable diseases including dengue continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Philippines.
New genetic test detects hundreds of harmful mutations among high-risk groups
Researchers at Nemours Children's Health System have developed a new low-cost genetic test that accurately identified more than 200 known disease-causing gene variations in two high-risk populations, the Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.
WINTHER trial results
Published in Nature Medicine, results of WINTHER, the first study pioneered by the WIN Consortium -- Genomic and transcriptomic profiling expands precision cancer medicine: the WINTHER trial -- shows that RNA profiling together with DNA testing matches more patients with advanced cancer to personalized therapies than DNA profiling for tumor mutations alone.
Human encroachment alters air quality over Amazon rainforest
Plumes of air pollution generated from a rapidly expanding city within the Amazon rainforest are wafting hundreds of miles and degrading air quality in the pristine rainforest, according to a team of scientists.
UMBC program to support diverse students in STEM successfully replicated at PSU, UNC
Five years ago, Pennsylvania State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill launched replications of UMBC's Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which over the last 30 years has earned national recognition for its strength in supporting diverse students in STEM.
Early, hormone-driven breast cancer is less likely to recur if treated with radiotherapy
Women with early, low-risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for 10 years.
Wristbands do a health check while you work out
Nanotech-powered electrodes help solve the challenges of using sweat to assess biological conditions in real time.
Hubble measurements suggest disparity in Hubble constant calculations is not a fluke
Hubble's measurements of today's expansion rate do not match the rate that was expected based on how the Universe appeared shortly after the Big Bang over 13 billion years ago.
New in the Hastings Center Report, March-April 2019
The federal right-to-try law's effect on the FDA, the gamification of science, how the Conscience and Religious Freedom Division is changing health care, and more in the latest issue.
Novel vaccine for colorectal cancer shows positive phase I results
The vaccine proves safe in a small sample of human subjects, opening the way for the next phase of testing.
'13 Reasons Why' and young adults' risk of suicide
A study of 729 young adults who completed surveys before and after the release of season two found beneficial and harmful effects.
Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration
Biologists have developed a computational model of flatworm regeneration to answer an important question in regeneration research - what are the signals that determine the rebuilding of specific anatomical structures?
Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns
More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts.
New Hubble measurements confirm universe is expanding faster than expected
New measurements from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope confirm that the Universe is expanding about 9% faster than expected based on its trajectory seen shortly after the big bang, astronomers say.
Researchers reveal key to targeting dormant cancer cells
Researchers have identified what keeps some cancer cells dormant -- a finding which could uncover new approaches to preventing the spread of cancer.
New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change
A new Rochester study has found that factors such as wind, currents, and even small fish play a larger role in transferring and storing carbon from the surface of the ocean to the deep oceans than was previously thought.
Diamonds reveal how continents are stabilized, key to Earth's habitability
The longevity of Earth's continents in the face of destructive tectonic activity is an essential geologic backdrop for the emergence of life on our planet.
Gonorrhoea cases on the rise across Europe
Following a decline in notification rates in 2016, the number of gonorrhoea cases has gone up by 17% across the reporting EU/EEA countries with more than 89,000 confirmed diagnoses in 2017 -- equivalent to 240 cases a day.
Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE
The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research.
Fishing for cures: New zebrafish model identifies drugs that kill pediatric cancer cells
A new immunodeficient zebrafish model developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators promises to be less expensive, easier to use and to improve personalized therapies for cancers and potentially other diseases.
Sex and diet affect protein machineries
Scientists from EMBL Heidelberg have discovered that the collection of proteins in an animal cell -- called the proteome -- is substantially affected by both the animal's sex and its diet.
Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos
In the Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches drawn to junk food are experiencing changes in their gut microbiota and their body mass as compared to finches that don't encounter human food, according to a new University of Connecticut study.
Mysterious eruption came from Campi Flegrei caldera
The caldera-forming eruption of Campi Flegrei (Italy) 40,000 years ago is the largest known eruption in Europe during the last 200,000 years, but little is known about other large eruptions at the volcano prior to a more recent caldera-forming event 15,000 years ago.
Dentists can be the first line of defense against domestic violence
New findings indicate that oral biomarkers may help health providers identify victims of domestic violence.
Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria
Bacterial cells use both a virus -- traditionally thought to be an enemy -- and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment.
Women with coronary artery wall thickness at risk for heart disease
The thickness of the coronary artery wall as measured by MRI is an independent marker for heart disease in women, according to a new study.
Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners
A Michigan Tech engineer has created a method to fill in the gaps of available connected vehicle data, which will give transportation planners a more accurate picture of traffic in their cities.
Injections, exercise promote muscle regrowth after atrophy in mice, study finds
By injecting cells that support blood vessel growth into muscles depleted by inactivity, researchers say they are able to help restore muscle mass lost as a result of immobility.
Using DNA templates to harness the sun's energy
As the world struggles to meet the increasing demand for energy, coupled with the rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere from deforestation and the use of fossil fuels, photosynthesis in nature simply cannot keep up with the carbon cycle.
Developing a model critical in creating better devices
Chemical engineering junior Preeya Achari has developed a new computational model to better understand the relationship between water and a type of two-dimensional material.
Drugs to prevent stroke and dementia show promise in early trial
Treatments that prevent recurrence of types of stroke and dementia caused by damage to small blood vessels in the brain have moved a step closer, following a small study.
Unravelling the complexity of air pollution in the world's coldest capital city
A joint Mongol-Japanese research team from the National University of Mongolia and Kanazawa University conducted the first detailed study of organic air pollutants in Ulaanbaartar city.
First major study of proteins in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
The most common form of childhood cancer is acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
High school students publish paper with RIT scientists analyzing rare bacterium
Three high school students from an urban charter school in Rochester, N.Y., found a rare e-coli-killing bacterium on a door handle at Rochester Institute of Technology while gaining college experience through a senior capstone program.
Prior authorization obstacles unnecessarily delay patient access to cancer treatments, survey finds
Restrictive prior authorization practices cause unnecessary delays and interference in care decisions for cancer patients, according to a new survey of nearly 700 radiation oncologists -- physicians who treat cancer patients using radiation-- released by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).
Battery research at TU Graz: New breakthroughs in research on super-batteries
Researchers at TU Graz have discovered a means of suppressing singlet oxygen formation in lithium-oxygen batteries in order to extend their useful lives.
Québec siblings with rare orphan disease lead to discovery of rare genetic diseases
Mutations in a gene involved in brain development have led to the discovery of two new neurodevelopmental diseases by an international team led by researchers at McGill University and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center.
Study in mice uncovers an unknown pathway for breast cancer tumors to recur
Experimenting in mice, the researchers tracked a series of events that enable a small reservoir of treatment-resistant cancer cells to awake from dormancy, grow and spread.
Bringing information into the cell
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have elucidated an important part of a signal pathway that transmits information through the cell membrane into the interior of a cell.
NASA finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Lorna
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Lorna.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth make landfall in northern Mozambique
Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country.
Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing
A new 50-state study on America's Wildlife Values led by researchers at Colorado State University and The Ohio State University describes individuals' values toward wildlife.
How cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders
Bochum-based psychologists have studied how the application of the stress hormone cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders.
Fitting a right hand in a left-handed mitten
Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand.
Researchers trace 3,000 years of monsoons through shell fossils
The tiny shells at the bottom of Lake Nakaumi in southwest Japan may contain the secrets of the East Asia summer monsoon.
Snowmelt causes seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera
A spring surge of meltwater, seeping through vertically tilted layers of rock, caused a seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera in 2017, according to research presented at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting.
Alcohol relapse rate among liver transplant recipients identical regardless of sobriety period
For decades, patients with liver disease related to alcohol use have been told they must be sober for six months before they can get a liver transplant.
Vascular surgery after firearm injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) found that among all hospitalizations that were due to firearm injury, patients who underwent surgical repair of their major blood vessels had the highest injury severity score (predictor of in-hospital death).
New approach to easier ice removal
Reducing the toughness, rather than the strength, between ice and the surface it covers is key to developing highly icephobic materials, a new study reports.
What makes mosquitoes avoid DEET? An answer in their legs
Many of us slather ourselves in DEET each summer in hopes of avoiding mosquito bites, and it generally works rather well.
Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods
Dr. Moffat leads a group which recently published the results of using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and GPS surveys to non-invasively map the location of unmarked graves within the Lake Condah Mission Cemetery in Eastern Australia.
Extracting something from nothing: A bright glow from empty space
Particles traveling through empty space can emit bright flashes of gamma rays by interacting with the quantum vacuum, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Strathclyde.
Magnets can help AI get closer to the efficiency of the human brain
Purdue University researchers have developed a process to use magnetics with brain-like networks to program and teach devices such as personal robots, self-driving cars and drones to better generalize about different objects.
Microscopic life in the saline soil of the Marismas del Odiel Natural Park
This research opens new perspectives in microbiome study of this type of environment, which can produce data on, among other aspects, possible climate alterations and other environmental factors in microbial populations.
The first laser radio transmitter
For the first time, researchers at Harvard School of Engineering have used a laser as a radio transmitter and receiver, paving the way for towards ultra-high-speed Wi-Fi and new types of hybrid electronic-photonic devices.
Inequality gap grew before the Great Recession and after, study finds
The Great Recession hit Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum, but the drivers behind these socioeconomic divides were mounting before the decline even hit, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE.
Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects
Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area.
Being too harsh on yourself could lead to OCD and anxiety
A new study has found that people who reported intense feelings of responsibility were susceptible to developing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) was published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.
Low awareness of hypertension and diabetes in China elderly causing public health concerns
Awareness and diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes in China has been limited, resulting in compromised treatment, and increased screening did not lead to significant improvements, according to a new study.
Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning
Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' -- even if it is not linguistic in nature.
The cellular source of fat tissue formation
Researchers working in mice and human tissue have identified several classes of adipocyte progenitor cells, which give rise to fat tissue, some of which reside in a recently discovered anatomical niche.

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