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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 26, 2019


Novel therapies slow CKD progression in patients with diabetes
The recently published CREDENCE study showed that SGLT2 inhibitors can slow progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes patients in addition to the effects seen with RAAS blockade.
3D optical biopsies within reach thanks to advance in light field technology
Research reveals the 3D potential of existing microendoscope technology
Higher weight increases risk of psoriasis
The higher a person's BMI, the greater the chance of getting psoriasis.
Carnegie Mellon chemists manipulate the quantum states of gold nanoclusters
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Chemistry have found a way to control the lifetime of the quantum states of gold nanoclusters by three orders of magnitude, which could lead to improvements in solar cell and photocatalysis technologies.
Gene repair improves memory and seizures in adult autism model
There may be reason to treat severe neurodevelopmental disorders at any stage of life, a new study of SYNGAP1 related autism suggests.
Humanization of antibodies targeting human herpesvirus 6B
A Japanese research group have succeeded in humanization of mouse antibodies that can neutralize the infection caused by human herpesvirus 6B.
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth over northern Mozambique
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the remnant clouds and storms still lingering over northern Mozambique on April 26.
AI-generated profiles? Airbnb users prefer a human touch
With so much at stake, should Airbnb hosts rely on an algorithm to write their profiles for them?
Red-neck phalarope: a migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea
When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area.
Creativity is not just for the young, study finds
If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story.
Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes
Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits.
A personality test for ads
People leave digital footprints online, and this information could helps marketers personalize ads based on individual personality types.
Bactericidal action of violacein revealed
Violet pigment is produced by microorganisms found in the environment, such as Chromobacterium violaceum and its various biological activities include the capacity to kill even bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics.
Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast
By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly.
Clearing an icy windshield is about to get easier, says UBC engineer
Scraping an icy windshield can be a seasonal struggle for those that live in colder climates.
Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US
Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting.
Gene-editing technology may produce resistant virus in cassava plant
The use of gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plants could have serious negative ramifications, according to new research by plant biologists.
Mount Sinai researchers find significant delays in West Nile virus reporting
Mount Sinai researchers found significant delays in reporting human cases of West Nile virus, hampering real-time forecasting of the potentially deadly mosquito-borne disease, according to a study in the JAMA Network Open in April.
Scientists take a 'metamaterials' approach to earthquake damage
At the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting, seismologists from around the world will discuss how metamaterial theory might be applied to everything from developing deflective barriers to manipulating the layout of buildings within a city as a way to minimize the impact of damaging surface seismic waves.
Biological machinery of cell's 'executioner' yields secrets of its control
Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital structural biologists have discovered how the cell switches on an executioner mechanism called necroptosis that induces damaged or infected cells to commit suicide to protect the body.
TET proteins regulate factors essential for normal antibody production
A report by researchers at la Jolla Institute for Immunology found that genetic deletion, or mutation, of TET2 and TET3 in mouse B cells damps down the generation of functional IgG antibodies, decreasing the effectiveness of immune responses.
How does chronic edema impact health-related quality of life?
Final results of the large, international LIMPRINT study have provided new data on the prevalence of chronic swelling and the devastating impact it can have on health-related quality of life.
Lionfish genes studied for clues to invasive prowess
What makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a successful and powerful invader in Atlantic Ocean waters compared to its rather lamb-like existence in its native Pacific Ocean?
NeurExo Sciences and Henry Ford present preclinical data on exposomes at ISEV2019
NeurExo Sciences, LLC and Henry Ford Health System today announced the presentation of new data on exosomes at the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) 2019 Annual Meeting being held April 24-28, 2019 in Kyoto, Japan.
Intervention increases healthy behavior among South African adolescents
Once plagued by malaria and tuberculosis, Sub-Saharan Africa now sees non-communicable diseases like diabetes and heart disease as some of the leading causes of death.
Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm
Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in 'good people,' psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal Nature Communications
Nanoparticles take a fantastic, magnetic voyage
MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site.
Ocean acidification 'could have consequences for millions'
Ocean acidification could have serious consequences for the millions of people globally whose lives depend on coastal protection, fisheries and aquaculture, a new publication suggests.
Changes from head injuries associated with increases in youth offending
A new longitudinal study looked at the impact on criminal persistence of head injuries, which have been linked to increased levels of offending, among adolescents and early adults.
Improving the lifetime of bioelectrodes for solar energy conversion
The use of proteins involved in the photosynthetic process enables the development of affordable and efficient devices for energy conversion.
Hubble snaps a crowded cluster
This sparkling burst of stars is Messier 75. It is a globular cluster: a spherical collection of stars bound together by gravity.
Gestational diabetes in India and Sweden
Indian women are younger and leaner than Swedish women when they develop gestational diabetes, a new study from Lund University shows.
Flexible circuits for 3D printing
A research cooperation between the University of Hamburg and DESY has developed a process suitable for 3D printing that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits.
A spoonful of peppermint helps the meal go down
When treated with peppermint oil, 63 percent of patients with disorders of the esophagus that cause difficulty swallowing and non-cardiac chest pain reported feeling much or slightly better, report Medical University of South Carolina researchers in Digestive Diseases & Sciences.
Mapping industrial 'hum' in the US
Using a dense sensor network that scanned the United States between 2003 and 2014, researchers have identified areas within the country marked by a persistent seismic signal caused by industrial processes.
US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years
New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats.
Children's NICU slashes unintended extubation rates by 60% over 10 years
A quality-improvement project at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Children's National that included standardized taping methods, bedside review of events within 72 hours and reducing how often newborns received chest X-rays reduced unintended extubations by 60% over 10 years and saved an estimated $1.5 million per year, according to research published online April 26, 2019, in Pediatrics.
NASA's Aqua satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Lorna
As Tropical Storm Lorna continued moving in a southerly direction in the Southeastern Indian Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and provided forecasters with a look at the storm.
What does the future of Kilauea hold?
Ever since Hawaii's Kilauea stopped erupting in August 2018, ceasing activity for the first time in 35 years, scientists have been wondering about the volcano's future.
Coffee machine helped physicists to make ion traps more efficient
Scientists from ITMO University have developed and applied a new method for analyzing the electromagnetic field inside ion traps.
Some children find it harder to understand what strangers are saying
New research by New York University Steinhardt Associate Professor Susannah Levi finds that children with poorer language skills are at a disadvantage when given tasks or being spoken to by strangers because they cannot, as easily as their peers, understand speech from people they do not know.
City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says
Concordia University associate professor of biology Carly Ziter writes that dense neighborhood tree canopy coverage can lower local temperatures significantly even compared to uncovered neighborhoods nearby.
No safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, suggest researchers
An international group of researchers has taken one of the first major steps in finding the biological changes in the brain that drive fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.
Mysterious volcanic ash layer from 29,000 years ago traced to volcano in Naples
Mysterious volcanic ash layer blanketing the Mediterranean 29,000 years ago traced to volcano in Naples, Italy.
Princeton geoscientists find new fallout from 'the collision that changed the world'
When India slammed into Asia, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more.
Large genome-wide association study is first to focus on both child and adult asthma
Asthma, a common respiratory disease that causes wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease worldwide.
Latitudinal gradient of plant phylogenetic diversity explained
The most discussed global pattern of species diversity along the latitudinal gradient has now an evolutionary explanation: museum vs cradle hypothesis broken into pieces.
Association between high blood PCB levels and premature death
High levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the blood are associated with premature death.
Common oral infections in childhood may increase the risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood
A Finnish 27-year follow-up study suggests that common oral infections in childhood, caries and periodontal diseases, are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood.
Quick reconnaissance after 2018 Anchorage quake reveals signs of ground failure
A day after the Nov. 30, 2018, magnitude 7 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska, US Geological Survey scientists Robert Witter and Adrian Bender had taken to the skies.
Lifetime flu vaccine?
Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu.
Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US
A first-of-its-kind study estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity.

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We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
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Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.