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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 29, 2019


Memory could be better protected in kids with brain tumors if treated with proton therapy
A comparison of three types of radiotherapy for children's brain tumors suggests that a type of proton therapy called pencil beam scanning offers the best hope of preserving cognitive functions.
Study suggests no direct link between drinking sugar sweetened drinks and higher energy consumption or BMI in children
A nationally representative UK survey of children (aged 4-10 years old) has found no strong/direct link between drinking sugar sweetened beverages and greater energy consumption or higher BMI.
Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs
Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs
Study: Millennials arrested more often than predecessors -- even when fewer crimes are committed
Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert.
GRACE mission data contributes to our understanding of climate change
Intended to last just five years in orbit on an experimental mission to measure changes in the Earth's gravitational fields, GRACE lasted over 15 years, providing unique insight into our global water resources, more accurate measurements of polar ice loss, ocean currents and the rise in global sea levels.
Ohio collaborative improves care of opioid-exposed infants
An Ohio Perinatal Quality Collaborative initiative has had a major impact on the care of opioid-exposed infants.
Estimates of illness, death among children, adolescents worldwide
This study analyzed data from around the world to estimate illness and death in children and adolescents (birth up to age 20) in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017.
Partitioning of porous materials
Gases and pollutants can be filtered from air and liquids by means of porous, crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).
Five things to know about loneliness in older adults
Loneliness, an emotional state rather than a mental disorder, can substantially affect the health of older adults, as well as use of health care services.
More intensive blood pressure therapy helps patients with type 2 diabetes regardless of cardiovascular risk
People with type 2 diabetes who received intensive treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 mm/Hg or below experienced fewer heart attacks, strokes and other diabetes complications.
Your present self is your best future self, according to new research
Predicting similarity over time is strongly related to happiness later on in life according to new study appearing Social Psychological and Personality Science.
$4.6 million grant funds clinical trial of stem cell immunotherapy for metastatic sarcoma and other hard-to-treat cancers
Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have been awarded a $4.6 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine -- also known as CIRM -- to support a phase I clinical trial of a novel treatment for advanced sarcomas and other cancers with a specific tumor marker called NY-ESO-1.
New approach to managing surgery will speed patient recovery but challenges current practices
A review in CMAJ challenges historical surgical practices that are not research-based, outlining a multidisciplinary approach called enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) that will help patients recover more quickly from surgery.
NASA shows winds causing Tropical Cyclone Lorna's demise
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Tropical Cyclone Lorna was being torn apart by strong northwesterly wind shear in the Southern Indian Ocean.
NASA looks at Tropical Storm Fani's rainfall rates
Tropical Storm Fani formed in the Northern Indian Ocean over the weekend of April 27 and 28, 2019.
Filaments and fibres three times finer than a human hair
The experts have discovered that there is a moment at which a polymer in liquid state -- specifically one that has been worked from polyethylene glycol, which is widely used in industry -- shows greater elasticity that, instead of breaking up and forming drops, the liquid experiences a stretching which causes filaments to be formed.
Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide
The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results.
How the bumble bee got its stripes
Researchers have discovered a gene that drives color differences within a species of bumble bees, helping to explain the highly diverse color patterns among bumble bees.
H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it
A new technology developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka may make H3N2 vaccine development a bit easier.
Widespread brain connections enable face recognition
Remembering a familiar face engages a wider network of brain regions than previously thought, according to a study of healthy men and women published in JNeurosci.
Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket
Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature.
Study: Loan-replacement grants boost low-income students' graduation rates
Receiving Illinois Promise loan-replacement grants influenced low-income students' decision to attend the University of Illinois and boosted their graduation rates, according to a new study led by the program's founding director, Susan Gershenfeld.
Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential
To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential.
Food system improvements could make it easier to eat healthier
Innovations in producing, processing, distributing, marketing and preparing food are needed to help Americans eat healthier.
Chemical evidence shows how a dwarf galaxy contributes to growth of Milky Way
An international team led by ZHAO Gang, a professor from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered a chemically peculiar star accreted from a disrupted dwarf galaxy.
The search for nothing at all
In a new set of results published April 29, 2019 in the journal Nature, Bill Fairbank and his team at Colorado State University have laid the foundation for a single-atom illumination strategy called barium tagging.
What makes memories stronger?
A team of scientists at NeuroElectronics Research Flanders (NERF- empowered by imec, KU Leuven and VIB) found that highly demanding and rewarding experiences result in stronger memories.
Tel Aviv university study paves way for innovative treatment of epilepsy
Tel Aviv University researchers have discovered that a drug commonly used to treat multiple sclerosis may, after necessary modifications, one day be used to treat patients with epilepsy.
Parasitoid wasps may turn spiders into zombies by hacking their internal code
A hijacked hormone may zombify spiders, altering their web-spinning behavior to favor wasp parasites.
Why a smell test should become part of a regular doctor visit
A new Michigan State University study suggests that older adults with poor sense of smell may see an almost 50% increase in their risk of dying within 10 years -- surprisingly in healthier individuals.
Magma is the key to the moon's makeup
For more than a century, scientists have squabbled over how the Earth's moon formed.
New 3D microscope visualises fast biological processes better than ever
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope.
Earlier detection of diabetic retinopathy with smartphone AI
Equipping a smartphone to capture retinal images and utilizing artificial intelligence to interpret them may help overcome barriers to ophthalmic screening for people with diabetes, new Kellogg Eye Center research shows.
Sensor-based technologies are promising to support independent living for older women
A study conducted at the University of Colorado College of Nursing on older women's perception of technology found that more active older adult women prefer wearable sensors for themselves and smart home sensors for their older parents.
US 1 of 8 nations where child & adolescent health improved but maternal mortality worsened
The United States is one of only eight countries in the world where decreases in child and adolescent mortality over a 27-year period haven't also been matched by reductions in maternal mortality, according to a new scientific study.
The Tietê, São Paulo State's main river, is filtered by dam reservoirs
Reservoir cascade steadily improves water transparency by retaining matter in suspension that affects light absorption, as measured by a study conducted in Brazil.
Consumption of caffeinated energy drinks rises in the United States
According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, energy drink consumption in the United States has increased substantially over the past decade among adolescents, young adults, and middle-aged adults.
Climate, grasses and teeth -- the evolution of South America mammals
Grass-eating mammals, including armadillos as big as Volkswagens, became more diverse in South America about 6 million years ago because shifts in atmospheric circulation drove changes in climate and vegetation, according to new research.
Prominently posted rules boost participation, cut harassment online
Clear behavioral rules posted prominently on online discussions can markedly increase participation while cutting harassment, new research from Princeton University has found.
'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success
A new analysis of academic productivity finds researchers' current working environments better predict their future success than the prestige of their doctoral training.
New 3D printed microscope promising for medical diagnostics in developing countries
Researchers have used 3D printing to make an inexpensive and portable high-resolution microscope that is small and robust enough to use in the field or at the bedside.
Federal research significant in environmental rule-making
Federally-sponsored science plays a more significant role in bringing together stakeholders and facilitating environmental governance debates than all other types of research, according to an international team of researchers.
The last chance for Madagascar's biodiversity
A group of scientists from Madagascar, UK, Australia, USA and Finland have recommended actions the government of Madagascar's recently elected president, Andry Rajoelina should take to turn around the precipitous decline of biodiversity and help put Madagascar on a trajectory towards sustainable growth.
Are buyers willing to forgo quality in locally grown produce?
Phillip Coles, professor of practice in management at Lehigh University, is among researchers who found that East Coast buyers aren't willing to forgo quality when it comes to local broccoli varieties.
Darwin can help your doctor
Taking an evolutionary view can inspire new ideas in clinical microbiology.
Cosmic dust reveals new insights on the formation of solar system
The study of a tiny grain of stardust -- older than our solar system -- is shining new light on how planetary systems are formed.
Keeping very low birth weight babies warm
UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospitals made its NICU a center of excellence for increasing the admission body temperature of their very low birth weight babies to greater than 36 degrees.
Study: Mindfulness may help decrease stress in caregivers of veterans
Caregivers of veterans who engaged in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy found it relieved stress, anxiety and worry, according to a new study led by University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo.
Oral cancer detection by dentists is significantly on the rise
After examining data gathered over an 11-year period in a first-of-its-kind provincial study, University of Toronto clinician-scientist Marco Magalhaes says that dentists in Ontario are detecting more cases of oral cancer and pre-cancer than ever before -- and it's saving lives.
How the olfactory brain affects memory
How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood.
Morning exercise can improve decision-making across the day in older adults
A study of older Australians has found a morning bout of moderate-intensity exercise improves cognitive performance like decision-making across the day compared to prolonged sitting without exercise.
New WHO research reveals wide gradient of severe child obesity across Europe, with southern Europe having the highest levels
New research from WHO Europe presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Glasgow, UK (April 28-May 1) shows there is a wide gradient of severe child obesity across Europe, with countries in Southern Europe generally having the highest rates.
Same brain cells active during sleep and exploration in mice
Researchers have mapped the activity of individual neurons deep in the brain during sleep and exploration of novel objects in male and female mice.
WHO study confirms breastfeeding protects against child obesity, however levels of breastfeeding across Europe are well off-target
New research from WHO published at this month's European Congress on Obesity shows that babies who are never or only partially breast fed have an increased risk of becoming obese as children compared to babies who are exclusively breastfed.
Berkeley Lab science snapshots April 2019
Three science briefs from Berkeley Lab.
Giant planets and big data: What deep learning reveals about Saturn's storms
A deep learning approach to detecting storms on Saturn shows the vast regions affected by storms and that dark storm clouds contain material swept up from the lower atmosphere.
Record solar hydrogen production with concentrated sunlight
EPFL researchers have created a smart device capable of producing large amounts of clean hydrogen.
Study reveals hip and knee replacement performance in England and Wales
The performance of different prosthetic implant combinations used in patients undergoing hip and knee replacements in England and Wales over the last 14 years have, for the first time, been directly compared in two new studies.
Study links exam stress with junk food cravings, snacking, and eating less fruit and veg
Increased stress during university examinations is associated with eating a poorer quality diet including less fruit and vegetables and more fast food, according to an observational study being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, UK (April 28-May 1, 2019).
Researchers find ice feature on Saturn's giant moon
Research team finds huge ice feature on Titan while trying to understand where Saturn's largest moon gets all of its methane.
FSU researcher finds hate crimes committed by groups hurt the most
Brendan Lantz, an assistant professor in the FSU College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, found that co-offending, or committing a crime with others, was significantly related to increased chances of serious injury regardless of the motivation behind the crime.
First genome-wide association study (GWAS) for Type 2 diabetes in youth findings
First Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) for Type 2 diabetes discovers seven genetic variants associated with the disease in young people.
Wax helps plants to survive in the desert
The leaves of date palms can heat up to temperatures around 50 degrees Celsius.
Drug treats Type 2 diabetes in children, team announces
Jane Lynch, M.D., FAAP, professor of pediatrics at UT Health San Antonio, said the drug liraglutide, in combination with an existing medication, metformin, showed robust effect in treating children with type 2 diabetes who were studied in the Ellipse trial.
House hunting is a struggle for mixed-race families
Couples with a black partner were significantly more likely to move to a neighborhood that was racially diverse but less affluent.
New polymer films conduct heat instead of trapping it
MIT engineers have flipped the picture of the standard polymer insulator, by fabricating thin polymer films that conduct heat -- an ability normally associated with metals.
The ACR and the Arthritis Foundation present new guidelines offering therapeutic approaches and treatment options for juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), in partnership with the Arthritis Foundation (AF), released two guidelines on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
Urine test could prevent cervical cancer
Urine testing may be as effective as the smear test at preventing cervical cancer, according to new research by University of Manchester scientists.
Co-use of cannabis and tobacco linked to poorer functioning among young adults
As marijuana is legalized in more jurisdictions, one challenge facing US public health officials is the chance that users will use cannabis and tobacco products together, as is common in many nations.
Research suggests strategy for more equitable Medicare reimbursement
Those who were enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid were sicker, had more cognitive impairments and difficulty functioning, and needed more social support than those who were not enrolled in both government programs, Saint Louis University research found.
Biomarker for chronic fatigue syndrome identified by Stanford researchers
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag chronic fatigue syndrome, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test.
Deep learning takes Saturn by storm
A 'deep learning' approach to detecting storms on Saturn is set to transform our understanding of planetary atmospheres, according to UCL and University of Arizona researchers.
Brain area tied to emotions is larger in vets, service members with mild TBI and PTSD
A new study finds that veterans and active-duty service members with combat-related PTSD and mild traumatic brain injury had larger amygdalas -- the region of the brain that processes such emotions as fear, anxiety, and aggression -- than those with only brain injuries.
Systematic review shows risk of a child developing overweight or obesity is more than trebled by maternal obesity prior to pregnancy
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28- May 1) reveals that the risk of a child becoming overweight or obese is more than trebled by maternal obesity prior to getting pregnant.
Precision medicine for pediatric cancers: New hope for children and adolescents
In 87% of patients, the study identified genomic anomalies that allowed for better patient management, either through better follow-up of residual disease, reclassification of the disease, or through the application of targeted therapy or to guide treatment and identify options for future personalized targeted therapy.
For certain invasive species, catching infestation early pays off
An international research team led by invasion ecologist Bethany Bradley at UMass Amherst has conducted the first global meta-analysis of the characteristics and size of invasive alien species' impacts on native species as invaders become more abundant.
Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers.
Water creates traps in organic electronics
Poor-quality organic semiconductors can become high-quality semiconductors when manufactured in the correct way.
Study links gene to sleep problems in autism
Research conducted by a team of Washington State University researchers has found that sleep problems in patients with autism spectrum disorder may be linked to a mutation in the gene SHANK3 that in turn regulates the genes of the body's 24-hour day and night cycle.
Tumor-selective angiotensin blockers may improve response to cancer immunotherapy
A research team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that combining a specialized version of an antihypertension drug with immune checkpoint blockers could increase the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.
Alcohol ads in sport fuel drinking culture
Repeated exposure to alcohol advertising in sport -- either at venues or during media coverage of matches -- can have long-term effects on drinking attitudes, according to a new international study.
Spinning black hole sprays light-speed plasma clouds into space
Astronomers have discovered rapidly swinging jets coming from a black hole almost 8,000 light-years from Earth.
What a dying star's ashes tell us about the birth of our solar system
A UA-led team of researchers discovered a dust grain forged in a stellar explosion before our solar system was born.
Caffeine prevents PGE1-induced disturbances in respiratory neural control
Researchers propose PGE exerts adenosine-mediated effects on brainstem mechanisms of respiratory control, which may lead to destabilization of breathing in human infants undergoing treatment for congenital heart disease.
Fleming's method in miniature
Scientists in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel have developed a method with which they can quickly test a very large number of molecules for antibiotic effect.
As oceans warm, microbes could pump more CO2 back into air, study warns
A new study suggests that CO2 regeneration may become faster in many regions of the world as the oceans warm with changing climate.
Surgery shown to improve walking for children with cerebral palsy
Children with cerebral palsy will now be able to have a surgical procedure that can improve their ability to walk, after analysis by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) and King's College London showed it to be effective.
New technique could pave the way for simple color tuning of LED bulbs
An international collaboration between Lehigh University, West Chester University, Osaka University and University of Amsterdam demonstrates the possibility of tuning the color of a GaN LED by changing the time sequence at which the operation current is provided to the device.
Plant cells eat their own ... membranes and oil droplets
Biochemists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered two ways that autophagy, or self-eating, controls the levels of oils in plant cells.
Attitudes toward physician-assisted death among adults with elevated level of biomarker associated with Alzheimer's disease
Cognitively normal adults with elevated levels of the biomarker amyloid-β, which is associated with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, were interviewed as part of this study that examined attitudes toward physician-assisted death.
Massachusetts General study finds women pay more for over-the-counter moisturizers
A study from dermatologists at Massachusetts General Hospital finds significant, gender-based price discrepancies in facial moisturizing products at three top online retailers - Amazon, Target, and Walmart.
Astronomers discover 2,000-year-old remnant of a nova
For the first time, a European research team involving the University of Göttingen has discovered the remains of a nova in a galactic globular cluster.
Are coffee farms for the birds? Yes and no
Through painstaking banding of individual birds, Sekercioglu asked whether the expansion of coffee plantations is reducing tropical bird biodiversity.
Continuous chemotherapy improves outcomes and quality of life in advanced breast cancer
Continuous chemotherapy shows greater benefit in patients with advanced breast cancer by both improving survival and maintaining quality of life compared to intermittent scheduling, according to analyses of the Stop&Go study presented at the ESMO Breast Cancer Congress 2019, May 2-4, Berlin, Germany.
African-American moms are helicopter parents too, but endgame is survival
African-American moms share many traits with helicopter parents, specifically when it comes to being overprotective and hypervigilant about their children's lives.
Mayo Clinic doctors: Fecal transplants may be best answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Unlike antibiotics, which are destructive by definition, fecal transplants or microbial replacement therapies, repopulate the gut with a diverse group of microbes that may block the C. diff's spore from germinating and propagating disease via its toxins.
For low-income countries, climate action pays off by 2050
The study shows that beyond the benefits of reduced extreme weather in the long term, global mitigation efforts would also lower oil prices in coming decades, resulting in a significant economic boon for most poorer countries.
Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Bees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide fly only a third of the distance that unexposed bees are able to achieve.
Inorganic perovskite absorbers for use in thin-film solar cells
A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin has succeeded in producing inorganic perovskite thin films at moderate temperatures using co-evaporation - making post-tempering at high temperatures unnecessary.
Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'
Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS).
Inhaled hydrogen could protect the brain during heart-lung bypass
Newborns with life-threatening congenital heart disease often need open-heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, which carries a risk of damaging the brain.
Demand growing for CV specialists trained to treat heart disease in cancer patients
The number of cardiologists trained in cardio-oncology, or the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients treated for cancer, does not currently meet the needs of this rapidly growing population.
'Right' cover-crop mix good for both Chesapeake and bottom lines
Planting and growing a strategic mix of cover crops not only reduces the loss of nitrogen from farm fields, protecting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, but the practice also contributes nitrogen to subsequent cash crops, improving yields, according to researchers.
How to purify water with graphene
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' together with their colleagues from Derzhavin Tambov State University and Saratov Chernyshevsky State University have figured out that graphene is capable of purifying water, making it drinkable, without further chlorination.
Dark matter exists: The observations which question its presence in galaxies disproved
As fascinating as it is mysterious, dark matter is one of the greatest enigmas of astrophysics and cosmology.
Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study
An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available.
New view on the mechanisms of how the brain works
After a series of studies, researchers at Lund University in Sweden, together with colleagues in Italy, have shown that not only one part, but most parts of the brain can be involved in processing the signals that arise from touch.
A simple solution to a complex problem
Freiburg researchers use a novel approach to identify a transport protein in mycobacteria.
Simple clinical features can help personalize type 2 diabetes treatment
A new study from the University of Exeter Medical School has shown that a person's characteristics such as weight and age at diabetes diagnosis provide a simple way to select the diabetes drug that is likely to be best for them.
Release of '13 Reasons Why' associated with increase in youth suicide rates
The Netflix show '13 Reasons Why' was associated with a 28.9% increase in suicide rates among US youth ages 10-17 in the month (April 2017) following the shows release, after accounting for ongoing trends in suicide rates, according to a study published today in Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
An important function of non-nucleated sperm
Some animals form characteristic infertile spermatozoa called parasperm, which differ in size and shape compared to fertile sperm produced by single males.
A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees
Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards.
Study highlights how little we know about women terrorists
The first large-scale research project evaluating the characteristics of women involved in jihadism-inspired terrorism finds significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups.
Responses to environmental tragedies often make matters worse, ethicists find
Without sound decision-making, responses to seeming environmental tragedies can often make matters worse, according to ethicists who analyzed a controversial goat removal program on an Australian island.
Are Canadians kept in the dark about new risks of medicines?
Government warnings about potential drug safety risks vary significantly across countries, according to a new international study co-authored by researchers at the University of British Columbia.
Ocean's 'seasonal memory' affects Arctic climate change
Researchers found out that the Arctic does not lose ice uniformly.
Patterns of compulsive smartphone use suggest how to kick the habit
UW researchers conducted in-depth interviews to learn why we compulsively check our phones.
Researchers identify ways to predict and avoid radiotherapy side effects
Latest results from a project to discover what makes a cancer patient more likely to suffer adverse side effects after radiotherapy have shown that a combination of biological markers and certain genetic changes can predict radiation sensitivity.
Rapid melting of the world's largest ice shelf linked to solar heat in the ocean
An international team of scientists has found part of the world's largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than the overall ice shelf average, due to solar heating of the surrounding ocean surface.
Use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes among women of reproductive age in US
Cigarette use was lower among pregnant women in the United States (8%) than among nonpregnant women (14.3%) but rates of e-cigarette use were almost identical (3.6% for pregnant women and 3.3% for nonpregnant women) in a study based on national health survey data.
Study scrutinizes credibility of weight management blogs by most
Weight management discussions on social media are very influential. But a new study assessing the underlying nutrition and weight management information provided by key UK social media influencers suggests that their blogs are not credible/trustworthy sources of advice.
Suicide rates spike nationally among youth after '13 Reasons Why' release
A recent study revealed approximately 195 more youth suicide deaths than expected were associated with the television series '13 Reasons Why' in the nine months immediately following the series release.
Diving into the details: A lipid-binding pocket is a target for new cancer therapies
Cell growth is tightly controlled; however, cancer cells overcome the normal growth controls and proliferate uncontrollably.
Autism diagnoses prove highly stable as early as 14 months
Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by trained professionals in children as young as 14 months are remarkably stable, suggesting that accurate screening and earlier treatment is feasible, report scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.
Study examines reliability of early diagnoses of ASD in toddlers
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is common in children and is, on average, generally detected and treated by about age 4.
Food packaging claims mislead consumers with ideas of health
Research finds four distinct ways that food brands claim to be ''healthy'' and how those types of claims influence consumers' expectations and choices for breakfast cereals, despite not being linked to the actual nutritional quality of the product.

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