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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 02, 2019


Easy on the eyes
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see.
Could mouth rinse to detect HPV DNA be associated with predicting risk of head/neck cancer recurrence, death?
Researchers examined if a mouth rinse to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA might be associated with helping to predict risk of recurrence of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death.
These trippy images were designed by AI to super-stimulate monkey neurons
To find out which sights specific neurons in monkeys 'like' best, researchers designed an algorithm, called XDREAM, that generated images that made neurons fire more than any natural images the researchers tested.
Children and teens who drink low-calorie sweetened beverages do not save calories
US children and teens who consumed low-calorie or zero-calorie sweetened beverages took in about 200 extra calories on a given day compared to those who drank water, and they took in about the same number of calories as youth who consumed sugary beverages, according to a new study.
A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history
Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby.
Perseverance toward life goals can fend off depression, anxiety, panic disorders
People who don't give up on their goals (or who get better over time at not giving up on their goals) and who have a positive outlook appear to have less anxiety and depression and fewer panic attacks, according to a study of thousands of Americans over the course of 18 years.
A new method to select the right treatment for advanced prostate cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified blood-based biomarkers that may determine which patients will benefit from continued hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer.
Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety
Caring for family members with dementia -- which is on the rise in the US -- causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers' risk of depression, anxiety and death.
BAT's year-long study to assess potential health effects of using Tobacco Heating Products
A year-long study to assess the health effects of switching from smoking cigarettes to using Tobacco Heating Products has been launched by British American Tobacco (BAT).
New study tracks perils of water polo head injuries
Water polo athletes take note: A new study by University of California, Irvine researchers maps out the frequency of head injuries in the sport and reveals which positions are the most vulnerable.
A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation
SysGenetiX project (UNIGE/UNIL) aimed to investigate the regulatory elements, as well as the manifold interactions between them and with genes, with the ultimate goal of understanding the mechanisms that render some people more predisposed to manifesting particular diseases than others.
Synthetic biology used to target cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue, study reports
Synthetic proteins engineered to recognize overly active biological pathways can kill cancer cells while sparing their healthy peers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Less-invasive mastectomy safe for more breast cancer patients, Mayo Clinic study finds
A less-invasive mastectomy that leaves the surface of the breast intact has become a safe option for more patients, including those whose breast cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes or who have risk factors for surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study shows.
Hearing loss weakens skills that young cancer survivors need to master reading
Researchers have identified factors that explain why severe hearing loss sets up pediatric brain tumor survivors for reading difficulties with far-reaching consequences.
New prognostic test could enable personalised treatment of inflammatory bowel disease
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new test that can reliably predict the future course of inflammatory bowel disease in individuals, transforming treatments for patients and paving the way for a personalised approach.
The mechanism of action of an antitumour drug used for the treatment of gliobla
The antibody mAb806 is used to treat glioblastoma, although its mechanism of action has been unknown until now.
Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher.
Chemical modifiers tag-team to regulate essential mechanism of life
For decades, scientists thought that one modification, phosphorylation, ran the show.
Forest fires accelerating snowmelt across western US, study finds
Forest fires are causing snow to melt earlier in the season, a trend occurring across the western US that may affect water supplies and trigger even more fires, according to a new study by a team of researchers at Portland State University (PSU) , the Desert Research Institute (DRI), and the University of Nevada, Reno.
Aging baby boomers push sky high incidence of shingles of the eye
More Americans are being diagnosed with eye complications of shingles, but older adults can call the shots on whether they are protected from the painful rash that can cost them their eyesight.
Biomarker may predict if immunotherapy is right choice for colorectal cancer patients
Foundational research could help metastatic colorectal cancer patients decide whether to choose immunotherapy or chemotherapy as a first treatment option.
BU researchers investigate differences in coatings of drug-coated balloon catheters
Drug-coated balloon catheters to open narrowed blood vessels and to deliver drugs to the impacted sites are used frequently for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease.
Tumor cells' drug addiction may be their downfall
Work by researchers at the Babraham Institute in partnership with the global biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca shows how cancer cells' acquired resistance to anti-cancer drugs proves fatal once the treatment compound is withdrawn.
Putting vision models to the test
MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain's visual cortex.
Why you love coffee and beer
Why do you swig bitter, dark roast coffee while your coworker guzzles sweet cola?
Study shows birds use social cues to make decisions
A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices.
Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet
Scientists at the University of Washington have discovered that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history: echolocation and diet.
Finnish school students outperform US students on 'fake news' digital literacy tasks
A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news.
Reasons for delay in pelvic organ prolapse treatment revealed
Many women do not seek early treatment for pelvic organ prolapse due to confusion and a lack of awareness around the condition's symptoms -- and feelings of shame and embarrassment -- according to new research.
Medical costs create hardships for more than half of Americans
A new study by American Cancer Society researchers finds more than half of people in the US report problems with affordability, stress, or delaying care because of medical costs
New BioIVT research on botanical-drug interactions published in Applied In Vitro Toxicology
This study investigates the potential for clinically-relevant botanical-drug interactions (BDIs) with Boswellia serrata (Indian Frankincense), a botanical that is used as an anti-inflammatory supplement.
Suicidal thoughts? Therapy-oriented website can help
Mental health researchers behind the website nowmattersnow.org have demonstrated that the site could be beneficial in decreasing suicidal thoughts.
New reading of the Mesha Stele inscription has major consequences for biblical history
Tel Aviv University archaeologists say that a new reading of the inscription on the Mesha Stele has major consequences for biblical history.
Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways
The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily.
Gulf killifish adapts to pollution with help of gene exchange with non-native cousin
The Gulf killifish of Galveston Bay, Texas, was both nearly doomed to local extinction by humans transforming its home to a toxic soup, and also rescued by humans -- through their accidental introduction of an invasive fish genetically armed with pollution-resistant traits.
Fingerprint of sleep habits as warning sign for heart disease
Chronic short sleep is associated with increased risk of clogged arteries, heart disease, and thus increased morbidity and mortality.
Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines
Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA 'vaccines' through royal jelly and worker jelly.
Field experiment finds a simple change that could boost agricultural productivity by 60%
Acknowledging 75% of the crop to tenants in crop-sharing contracts, instead of the customary 50%, can boost agricultural productivity and income levels in developing countries.
Researchers identify drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing
The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report May 2 in the journal Cell.
Researchers find gene for urethral obstruction
Even before birth, an obstructed urethra can cause a variety of issues in the unborn child, ranging from mild urinary problems to kidney failure.
Food dye, the secret ingredient for 3D printing biocompatible hydrogels with life-like vasculature
Yellow food dye #5 -- a common food additive -- is revealed as the secret ingredient in 3D printing biomaterials with complex physically entangled networks, which characterize biological tissues, according to a new report.
New cancer therapy target found in mitochondria for potential treatment of blood cancers
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center identified a new therapeutic target in cancer cells and explains how new anti-cancer drugs called imipridones work by inducing cancer cell death in blood cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and mantle cell lymphoma.
Risk of deaths among incarcerated youth by suicide on the rise
A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, shows there is little disagreement that youth in custody are at an increased risk for suicidal behavior.
Pathogens find safe harbor deep in the gastric glands
Scientists have long tried to understand how pathogenic bacteria like Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor for stomach ulcers and cancer, survive in the harsh environment of the stomach.
Self-powered wearable tech
For emerging wearable tech to advance, it needs improved power sources.
Newly discovered gene mutation reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oulu have discovered of a new type of gene mutation that reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction.
The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities
Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down.
Make room on the couch: Worms suffer from PTSD, too
Dr. Alon Zaslaver at Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Genetics Department discovered that even a very basic animal life form like the C. elegans worm has the ability to learn from past experiences.
New study finds high rates of formula use with low-income infants, recommends changes
New research by George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services found high rates of non-exclusive breastfeeding and early infant formula introduction.
What is pepper spray? (video)
Whether it's walking down a dark street at night or fighting off grizzly bears on the trail, pepper spray is an effective tool to fend off an attacker and get safely away.
Pretreatment with TNF inhibitors may improve outcomes of combination cancer immunotherapy
This study proposes a new therapeutic approach against cancer that dissociates efficacy and toxicity in the use of combined immunotherapy in animal models.
Severe tinnitus associated with suicide attempts in women
Previously, severe ringing in the ears (tinnitus) has been associated with depression and anxiety, and a 2016 study reported an association with increased risk of suicide attempts.
Pluripotency or differentiation -- That is the question
Induced pluripotent stem cells can turn into any type of cell in the body or remain in their original form.
The immaculate conception?
A new, groundbreaking study by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos.
Researchers ready B cells for novel cell therapy
Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells -- a type of white blood cell in the immune system -- to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases.
Open heart surgery outperforms stents in patients with multivessel disease
Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery may be the best treatment option for most patients with more than one blocked heart artery, according to research published today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, published by Elsevier.
Design flaws create security vulnerabilities for 'smart home' internet-of-things devices
NC State researchers find countermeasures for designers of security systems and other smart home devices.
Blood pressure drug shows no benefit in Parkinson's disease
A study of a blood pressure drug does not show any benefit for people with Parkinson's disease, according to findings released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4-10, 2019.
Research on Reddit identifies opioid addiction self-treatment risks
Using advanced machine-learning techniques, Georgia Tech researchers have examined nearly 1.5 million Reddit posts to identify risks associated with several of the most common alternative -- and unproven -- 'treatments' for opioid addiction.
Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs
The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs.
Knit 1, purl 2: Assembly instructions for a robot?
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have used computationally controlled knitting machines to create plush toys and other knitted objects that are actuated by tendons.
Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops.
Sexuality continues to change and develop well into adulthood, finds study
A new study has shown that traditional labels of 'gay', 'bisexual' and 'straight' do not capture the full range of human sexuality, and whether a person is attracted to the same, or opposite sex can change over time.
Researchers putting the brakes on lethal childhood cancer
Reporting this week in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers conclude that blocking MYC could be 'unexpectedly effective' in treating MRT as well as other cancers driven by inactivation of SNF5.
Obstacles to overcome before operating fleets of drones becomes reality
The technology exists to replace a single remote controlled drone with an automated fleet, but an Iowa State researcher says there are several obstacles to tackle first.
This hawk likes crab for dinner
This is the first report of a red-shouldered hawk attacking and presumably consuming any species of crab and the first report of probable ghost crab predation by a raptor in North America.
Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa
A study published this week that analyzed 15 years of mosquito surveillance data shows Iowa's western counties experience a higher abundance of the species thought to most commonly carry West Nile virus.
New chemical probe for visualizing brain immune cells
Researchers in South Korea and Singapore have, for the first time, developed a chemical probe that enables live-imaging of a type of immune cells in the brain, known as microglia, in a live animal brain.
Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms
Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago -- a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids.
It's hard to be a nomad in Mongolia
Scientists tracked 22 Mongolian gazelles (Procapra gutturosa) over the vast grasslands of Mongolia for a 1-3 year period using GPS.
High thermal conductivity of new material will create energy efficient devices
Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices -- including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars.
Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail
Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents.
How could a changing climate affect human fertility?
Human adaptation to climate change may include changes in fertility, according to a new study by an international group of researchers.
Hubble assembles wide view of the distant universe
Astronomers developed a mosaic of the distant Universe that documents 16 years of observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
New digital filter approach aims to improve chemical measurements
A Purdue University professor and expert in measurement science has led a team to design a new filter aimed at helping drug developers and researchers create more exact measurements early in the drug development stage, which can ultimately help move a drug to clinical trials faster.
What drives multiple female acorn woodpeckers to share a nest?
In some acorn woodpecker family groups, related females lay eggs in the same nest and raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males.
Ragon Institute study identifies viral peptides critical to natural HIV control
Investigators at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have used a novel approach to identify specific amino acids in the protein structure of HIV that appear critical to the ability of the virus to function and replicate.
Drug combination could be effective for treatment-resistant gonorrhea
Scientists comparing treatments for gonorrhea have identified a drug combination that could be an effective back-up for patients not responding to current therapy.
Laser-driven spin dynamics in ferrimagnets: How does the angular momentum flow?
A team of researchers led by scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin has now been able to follow the flow of angular momentum during ultrafast optical demagnetization in a ferrimagnetic iron-gadolinium alloy in great detail, in order to understand the fundamental processes and their speed limits.
Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria
A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations.
Immigrants: citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked
How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome?
LIGO and Virgo detect neutron star smash-ups
On April 25, 2019, the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector registered gravitational waves from what appears likely to be a crash between two neutron stars -- the dense remnants of massive stars that previously exploded.
AIDS in America -- Back in the headlines at long last
President Trump's recent call to end the HIV epidemic in the US has turned attention to a domestic public health crisis that has been absent from the headlines.
ESA tipsheet for May 6, 2019
Get a sneak peek at these new scientific papers in the Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Nature reserves and wilderness areas plagued by understaffing and budget shortfalls; Extremely old trees endure in China; Fuel breaks stop wildfire in its tracks -- but may create new problems; Connecting species to possible future safe havens; and Wildfires as an ecosystem service.
Dynamic checklist developed for web designers to work more efficiently, creatively
The research team will present their findings at the Association of Computing Machinery's Human-Computer Interaction conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Glasgow, Scotland, on May 7, 2019.
NASA goes infrared on powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani
NASA's Aqua satellite focused an infrared eye on a very powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani as it approached landfall in northeastern India.
Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host
New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection -- paving the way for new treatments.
Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control
Breakthrough 'gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment.
When it comes to planetary habitability, it's what's inside that counts
Which of Earth's features were essential for the origin and sustenance of life?
What happens when schools go solar?
Rooftop solar projects at schools could reduce harmful air pollution, help the environment and enhance student learning while cutting electricity costs, a new study finds.
Dwarfs under dinosaur legs: 99-million-year-old millipede discovered in Burmese amber
An 8.2-millimeter fossil millipede was discovered in Burmese amber. Having used new-age 3D X-ray microscopy, a Bulgarian-German research team confirmed this is the first fossil millipede of the entire order.
Pinpointing Gaia to map the Milky Way
This image, a composite of several observations captured by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST), shows the ESA spacecraft Gaia as a faint trail of dots across the lower half of the star-filled field of view.
Mobile prenatal app shown to reduce in-person visits during pregnancy
Using the mobile app Babyscripts reduced in-person prenatal care visits while maintaining patient and provider satisfaction, according to research published in JMIR mHealth and uHealth by physician researchers from the George Washington University
Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago
Columbia University and University of Florida researchers finds sign of cosmic event that created elements that became part of us.
Giant panda's bamboo diet still looks surprisingly carnivorous
Giant pandas are unusual in being extremely specialized herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite belonging to a clade (Carnivora) of primarily flesh-eating carnivores.
Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds
If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells.
Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory
Currently, information on a computer is encoded by magnetic fields, a process that requires substantial energy and generates waste heat.
Hubble astronomers assemble wide view of the evolving universe
Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive 'history book' of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
Exploding electrical wires underwater to understand shock waves
Shock wave studies allow researchers to achieve the warm dense matter that's found only in the extreme conditions around stars and created in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion research, and researchers in Israel recently set out to understand the relation, if any, between the evolution of a shock wave and the expansion of the exploding wire.
Major violent attacks against Jews spiked 13% worldwide in 2018
Thirteen Jews were murdered as the result of anti-Semitic attacks in 2018, and the number of other major violent anti-Semitic attacks spiked 13%, from 342 to 387 incidents worldwide, according to an annual report published yesterday by Tel Aviv University's Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry.
Tapping fresh water under the ocean has consequences
While offshore groundwater resources could be used for drinking, agriculture and oil recovery, new research suggests tapping into them could lead to adverse impacts onshore.
Controlling primate neural activity using artwork from artificial neural networks
By showing macaques images generated by an artificial neural network, researchers were able to control the activity of specific neurons within the visual systems of these animals' brains, according to a new study.
Localized efforts to save coral reefs won't be enough, study suggests
A National Science Foundation study of factors that cause corals stress suggests that localized attempts to curb pollution on reefs won't save them without a worldwide effort to reduce global warming.
Study looks at association of high cholesterol levels, statin use with glaucoma risk
A study of adults 40 and older suggests high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for the most common form of glaucoma, while longer use of a cholesterol-lowering statin, compared with never using, was associated with lower risk.
Young frogs that were stressed as tadpoles move less on land, putting their survival at risk
New research shows that juvenile northern red-legged frogs that have experienced climate-related stress as tadpoles are less likely to move on land, putting their survival at risk.
Emergency room patients acuity levels not always considered when within wait time target
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business reveals that Metro Vancouver emergency patient acuity levels sometimes come second to wait time targets, largely due to doctors being unclear around existing emergency room prioritization guidelines.
For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'
New research using an approach called nutritional geometry sheds light on giant panda evolution, and their unusual transition from carnivorous ancestry to extreme specialized herbivory.
Seeking better detection for chronic malaria
In people with chronic malaria, certain metabolic systems in the blood change to support a long-term host-parasite relationship, a finding that is key to eventually developing better detection, treatment and eradication of the disease, according to research published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.
Viral infections during pregnancy linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring
Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy behave abnormally, consistent with behavioral alterations in autism or schizophrenia.
Opportunistic cancer cells 'slip through the gaps' to spread through blood vessels
Cancer cells may rely on opportunism, as well as chemical signalling, to spread through the body, according to new findings by mathematicians at the University of Birmingham.
Study suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones
Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers at Tufts University have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone.
Bronx river turtles get a check-up
A team of scientists and veterinarians gave a health evaluation of turtles living in the Bronx River, one of the most urbanized rivers in the U.S. and the only remaining freshwater river that flows through New York City.
India could meet air quality standards by cutting household fuel use
India could make a major dent in air pollution by curbing emissions from dirty household fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene, shows a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the India Institute of Technology.
Mutational intensity influences a tumor's response to PD-1 immunotherapy
Following FDA approval last year of PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors for tumors with mismatch repair deficiency, a new study reveals more about why responses of these tumors to this immunotherapy vary, specifically implicating mutation intensity.
OU study on explosive volcanism during ice age provides lessons for today's rising CO2
A University of Oklahoma-led study recently found that explosive volcanic eruptions were at least 3-8 times more frequent during the peak of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (~360 to 260 million years ago).
New brain mechanisms regulating body weight
Researchers at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, clarify the link between the molecule interleukine-6 (IL-6) in the brain and obesity.
Sculpting super-fast light pulses
Researchers have developed a novel and compact method of shaping ultrafast light pulses.
Hybridization leads to pollution tolerance in fish from polluted Houston ship channel
Recent hybridization of the Gulf killifish -- a large minnow common in the heavily polluted Houston Ship Channel -- has enabled the species to adapt rapidly to extreme pollution, a Baylor University study has found.
Connecting neurons in the brain
Leuven researchers uncover new mechanisms of brain development that determine when, where and how strongly distinct brain cells interconnect.
Johns Hopkins researchers develop soft tissue substitute with fewer side effects
A team of plastic surgeons and material scientists has made an important advance in treating the common clinical problem of soft tissue loss.
Invasive beavers: Bad for the climate
Scientists documented the effects of invasive North American beavers (Castor canadensis) on carbon sequestration of a riparian forest in Tierra del Fuego.
Researchers crack the peanut genome
Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut's unlikely and complicated evolution.
Researchers make organic solar cells immune to the ravages of water, air and light
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have devised a way of making organic solar panels robust by performing the molecular equivalent of hair removal by waxing: they used adhesive tape to strip the electron-accepting molecules from the topmost surface of the photoactive layer of the cell.
More than 100 years of data show Pennsylvania tick population shift
The prevalence of the most abundant species of ticks found in Pennsylvania has shifted over the last century, according to Penn State scientists, who analyzed 117 years' worth of specimens and data submitted primarily by residents from around the state.

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