Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 03, 2019


A question of time
Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens.
Heart damage from preterm birth may be corrected with exercise in young adulthood
Heart abnormalities caused by premature birth may be corrected with exercise in young adulthood, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Brain imaging lie detector can be beaten with simple techniques, research shows
This is a peer-reviewed observational study conducted in humans. Researchers have shown that a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) 'lie detector' test, which measures brain activity, can be 'deceived' by people using mental countermeasures.
Bottom-up approach can synthesize microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing
In a paper published May 3 in Science Advances, researchers at the University of Washington, the US Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory announced that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce specific types of chemical elements into the crystal lattice of nanodiamonds -- giving the microscopic diamonds properties that could be useful for cell and tissue imaging, as well as quantum communication and quantum computing.
Hotspot in the genome may drive psychosis in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
A newly identified epigenetic hotspot for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may give scientists a fresh path forward for devising more effective treatments and biomarker-based screening strategies.
Stephenson Cancer Center physician is senior author on major study
A gynecologic oncologist at the Stephenson Cancer Center at OU Medicine was a national leader of a newly published research study that reveals good news for women with ovarian cancer -- longer survival times plus a treatment option that causes fewer difficult side effects.
Induced labor not more expensive to health care system than spontaneous labor
The results of a joint study between University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare show inducing labor one week early costs the same as waiting for spontaneous labor.
Early-stage detection of Alzheimer's in the blood
Using current techniques, Alzheimer's disease, the most frequent cause of dementia, can only be detected once the typical plaques have formed in the brain.
Da Vinci's hand impairment caused by nerve damage, not stroke, suggests new study
A fainting episode causing traumatic nerve damage affecting his right hand could be why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills were hampered in his late career.
What the wheat genome tells us about wars
First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history.
Elderly survivors of three common cancers face persistent risk of brain metastasis
Elderly survivors of breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma face risk of brain metastasis later in life, and may require extra surveillance in the years following initial cancer treatment.
Study demonstrates seagrass' strong potential for curbing erosion
An MIT study shows how seagrass can help to protect shorelines against erosion and help to mitigate damage from rising sea level, potentially providing useful guidance for seagrass restoration efforts.
Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation may increase the risk of hypertension, a known cause of heart disease and stroke
A long-term study of Russian nuclear plant workers suggests that prolonged low-dose radiation exposure increases the risk of hypertension.
Stanford researchers' artificial synapse is fast, efficient and durable
A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain's efficiency and ability to learn.
Breaking bread with rivals leads to more fish on coral reefs
When fishermen and women communicate with their fisher rivals, and cooperate over local environmental problems, they can improve the quality and quantity of fish on coral reefs.
How grunting influences perception in tennis
Grunting noises in tennis influence the prediction of ball flight.
Study shows drug reduces risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica
The drug eculizumab, a synthetic antibody that inhibits the inflammatory response, significantly reduced the risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD).
Mental well-being predicts leisure time physical activity in midlife
Men and women with high mental well-being at the age of 42 were more physically active at the age of 50 compared to those who got lower scores in mental well-being at age 42.
Novel thermoelectric nanoantenna design for use in solar energy harvesting
In an article published in the SPIE Journal of Nanophotonics (JNP), researchers from a collaboration of three labs in Mexico demonstrate an innovative nanodevice for harvesting solar energy.
Missing molecule hobbles cell movement
Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs.
Study examines private insurance claims for naloxone prescriptions
A study based on a national database of private insurance claims suggests few patients at high risk of opioid overdose receive prescriptions for naloxone, which can reverse an overdose, during encounters with the health care system from hospitalizations and emergency department visits to physician visits.
Avoid smoky environments to protect your heart
If a room or car is smoky, stay away until it has cleared.
Training for first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of blood vessels
Training for and completing a first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of major blood vessels, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
UC Riverside study busts myths about gossip
A new UC Riverside study asserts that women don't engage in 'tear-down' gossip any more than men, and lower income people don't gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts.
DNA test is an effective cervical cancer screening tool for women in low-income countries
Dartmouth researchers have introduced an inexpensive DNA-based test for human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of cervical cancer, in Honduras.
First demonstration of antimatter wave interferometry
An international collaboration with participation of the University of Bern has demonstrated for the first time in an interference experiment that antimatter particles also behave as waves besides having particle properties.
The sense of touch is formed in the brain before birth
All the surface of the human body is represented in the cerebral cortex in a transversal band localized at the external part of the cerebral hemispheres: the somatosensory cortex.
Azithromycin appears to reduce treatment failure in severe, acute COPD exacerbations
The antibiotic azithromycin may reduce treatment failure in patients hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies
A new approach to RNA sequencing reveals thousands of previously inaccessible RNA fragments in blood plasma that might serve as disease- and organ-specific biomarkers
RIT professor develops microfluidic device to better detect Ebola virus
A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus.
Climate extremes explain 18%-43% of global crop yield variations
Climate extremes, such as drought, heatwaves, heavy precipitation and more are responsible for 18%-43% of variation in crop yields for maize, spring wheat, rice and soybeans. according to a new paper published in Environmental Research Letters.
Vital signs can now be monitored using radar
A radar system developed at the University of Waterloo can wirelessly monitor the vital signs of patients, eliminating the need to hook them up to any machines.
Quantum sensor for photons
A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost.
Stickier than expected: Hydrogen binds to graphene in 10 femtoseconds
Graphene is an extraordinary material consisting of pure carbon just a single atomic layer thick.
Hubble spots a stunning spiral galaxy
NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (the Lion), and was studied as part of a Hubble survey of the central regions of roughly 145 nearby disk galaxies.
New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals
Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals.
New review identifies four hallmarks of cancer metastasis
Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Kansas Cancer Center have identified four hallmarks of cancer metastasis -- when cancer has spread to different parts of the body from where it started.
Study finds that collaborating with business contributes to academic productivity
Results of survey involving more than 1,000 researchers were presented to 8th Annual Meeting of Global Research Council in São Paulo.
Cancer cells have a problem with junk RNA that makes them vulnerable
The important role of the ADAR enzyme and junk RNA in cancer cells opens an entirely new playbook for the treatment of tumors, one that is focused on RNA rather than DNA.
Researchers identify a protein that protects against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Work headed by scientist Antonio Zorzano proposes a possible therapeutic target to treat fatty liver, a disease for which there is currently no treatment.
Cooperation among fishers can improve fish stock in coral reefs
Cooperation within a group of people is key to many successful endeavors, including scientific ones.
Study asks patients' input to improve the hospital experience
Patient and caregivers were among the 499 stakeholders who submitted their priority questions about hospital care for the i-HOPE Study, led by Dr.
New holographic technique opens the way for quantum computation
EPFL physicists have developed a method based on the principles of holograms to capture 3D images of objects beyond the reach of light.
Crowd oil -- Fuels from air-conditioning systems
Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Toronto have proposed a method enabling air conditioning and ventilation systems to produce synthetic fuels from carbon dioxide (CO2) and water from the ambient air.
New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells
Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image.
Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars
A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy.
Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions
Ranch managers' placement of cattle corrals away from Jackson's hartebeest likely would allow the antelope species to increase, with lions focused on the zebras that congregate at the resulting glades in central Kenya.
Needleless vaccine will protect children from dangerous viruses
Orally administered vaccine can protect millions from hepatitis B. Oral vaccines are both safer and less expensive than injections.
Regenstrief, IU, Purdue research presented on national stage
Regenstrief Institute faculty members are sharing the institute's groundbreaking research with national leaders in geriatrics at the 2019 annual meeting for the American Geriatrics Society in Portland, Oregon, May 2-4.
Monitoring the lifecycle of tiny catalyst nanoparticles
In order to tailor nanoparticles in such a way that they can catalyse certain reactions selectively and efficiently, researchers need to determine the properties of single particles as precisely as possible.
Tiny droplets open the doors to in-flight imaging of proteins
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the creation of a beam of nanodroplets capable of delivering a variety of biological samples, from cell organelles to single proteins, virtually free from any contaminations, to the focus of an X-ray laser which can be used to image them.
NASA reveals heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Fani
Satellite data revealed heavy rainfall in powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani before it made landfall in northeastern India.
Nanoscale thermometers from diamond sparkles
The development of a novel, non-invasive technique that uses quantum light to measure temperature at the nanoscale will have immediate applications for both industry and fundamental scientific research, scientists say.
Study reveals amyloid clumps of a truncated p53 structure related to endometrial cancer
Brazilian scientists have discovered that a truncated variant of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is present as amyloid aggregates in endometrial cancer cells.
Researchers develop better way to determine coastal flooding risk
Researchers have developed a new methodology for building computer models that paves the way to better understanding the flood risks faced by coastal communities.
Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing, USC stem cell study finds
How do bones heal, and how could they heal better?

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...