Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 09, 2019


Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia.
Good genes
A team of scientists from NAU, Arizona State University, the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts and nine other institutions worldwide to study potential cancer suppression mechanisms in cetaceans, the mammalian group that includes whales, dolphins and porpoises.
Private health plans pay hospitals 2.4 times what Medicare would pay
Hospital costs account for nearly half of all personal health spending for the privately insured, but relatively is known about how much more the privately insured pay hospitals relative to Medicare patients.
New model of measles-elimination progress may help target vaccination efforts
A country's progress towards measles elimination can be mapped on a 'canonical path' that in turn can guide vaccination strategies, according to a study from scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research.
Scientists find link between digital media use and depression in Chinese adolescents
Adolescents in China who either spend more time on screen activities, such as watching TV or surfing the Web, or less time on non-screen activities, including physical activity, are at risk and significantly more likely to experience depression, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier.
Diabetes linked to numerous cancers in large Chinese study
A new Journal of Diabetes study from China, which has the highest number of people with diabetes among all countries, found that type 2 diabetes was linked with an elevated risk of 11 types of cancer in men and 13 types of cancer in women.
Can adverse childhood experiences worsen lupus symptoms?
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) encompass traumas such as abuse, neglect, and household challenges.
Are otters threatening amphibian populations?
The Eurasian otter typically eats fish, but amphibians, which are in global decline, are also part of its diet, especially when fish are scarce.
Nurse care coordinators are key to success of patient-centered medical home programs
In a new study, George Mason University faculty researchers assessed primary care provider experiences with the CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program.
Hummingbird robot uses AI to soon go where drones can't
Purdue University researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, trained by machine learning algorithms based on various techniques the bird uses naturally every day.
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology and The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Whole body MRI may help to detect spread of cancers more quickly
Trials with people with newly-diagnosed colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer suggest that whole body MRI could reduce the time it takes to diagnose the stage of cancers.
Plants and the art of microbial maintenance
How plants use chemicals to sculpt their ecological niche.
Do most Americans believe in human-caused climate change?
A survey of more than 7,000 US adults finds that three format changes produce significant changes in estimates of acceptance of human-caused climate change.
'Robopets' can benefit health and wellbeing of older care home residents
Robotic pets that respond to human interaction can benefit the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes, a study from the University of Exeter Medical School has found.
Stem cells provide information about neuron resilience in ALS
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a stem cell based model in order to study the resilience and vulnerability of neurons in the neurodegenerative disease ALS.
Detection of unusual hybrid schistosomes in Malawi
LSTM's Professor Russell Stothard is senior author on a new paper in which researchers from the UK and Malawi have described the unusual occurrence of novel schistosome hybrids infecting children along the Shire River Valley.
The heart 'talks' to fat cells, Temple scientists discover
Like sending a letter through the mail or a text over a cellular network, the heart can generate messages that travel long distances through the body.
Meditation needs more research: Study finds 25% suffer unpleasant experiences
More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate have had a 'particularly unpleasant' psychological experience related to the practice, including feelings of fear and distorted emotions, a UCL-led study has found.
Inflammatory bowel disease during childhood linked to higher cancer rates and early death
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study revealed an increased risk of cancer and early death in individuals who developed inflammatory bowel disease-including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) -- during childhood.
Researchers develop viable, environmentally-friendly alternative to Styrofoam
Washington State University researchers have developed an environmentally-friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.
EU sustainable development policy defines entrepreneurship in three distinct ways
A new study has found three distinct ways in which the European Union defines what entrepreneurship means for sustainable development, producing a blurry message of the role entrepreneurs and business owners have to play in tackling the global issue.
Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene
Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day.
Scientists grow precursors for human pigment cells
Our hair, skin and eyes are colored by a pigment called melanin, which is produced by pigment cells called melanocytes.
Finnish researchers discover a new moth family
Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery.
North York General study shows safest method for prostate cancer biopsies
Only one percent of testing for prostate cancer in North America is done using TPBx.
Gravitational forces in protoplanetary disks may push super-Earths close to their stars
Penn State-led astronomers found that as planets form out of the chaotic churn of gravitational, hydrodynamic -- or, drag -- and magnetic forces and collisions within the dusty, gaseous protoplanetary disk that surrounds a star as a planetary system starts to form, the orbits of these planets eventually get in synch, causing them to slide -- follow the leader-style -- toward the star.
Opposites attract and, together, they can make surprisingly gratifying decisions
Little is known about how consumers make decisions together. A new study by researchers from Boston College, Georgia Tech and Washington State University finds pairs with opposing interpersonal orientations -- the selfish versus the altruistic -- can reach amicable decisions about what to watch on TV, or where to eat, for example.
Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria
Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that performs photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor to maximize their light-harvesting capacity under different light environments.
A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down.
Will MSC micropellets outperform single cells for cartilage regeneration?
Repair of cartilage injuries or defects is aided by the introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be incorporated into hydrogels to amplify their effects.
Migraines may increase risk of pregnancy complications
In a study of women in Denmark with and without migraines who became pregnant, migraines were associated with an increased risk of pregnancy-associated hypertension disorders in the mother.
Fracture risk tool useful in women with breast cancer initiating aromatase inhibitor therapy
The FRAX® tool takes into account certain factors to determine the risk of bone fracture in the general population.
Ancient DNA suggests that some Northern Europeans got their languages from Siberia
Most Europeans descend from a combination of European hunter-gatherers, Anatolian early farmers, and Steppe herders.
A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective drug delivery
Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to researchers at McGill University.
Statins linked to lower risk of early death in patients with colorectal cancer
Use of statins before or after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer was linked with a lower risk of premature death, both from cancer and from other causes, in a Cancer Medicine analysis of published studies.
Neurodevelopmental disorders may be rooted in genetics and mitochondrial deficits
A new study published in Neuron provides the first evidence showing that individual nerve cells fail to make the right number of connections.
New analysis predicts top 25 US counties at risk for measles outbreaks
A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019.
Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc
The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era.
How genomics profiling can help identify the best treatment for bladder cancer
A new computational tool -- a single-patient classifier -- effectively enables physicians to assign a bladder cancer subtype to an individual patient's cancer using that patient's genomic data.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Lili
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Cyclone Lili, located north of the coast of Australia's Northern Territory.
White people struggle to perceive emotion on black people's faces
Being able to accurately identify emotions in others is important for social interaction in general, but particularly so in interracial contexts, which are prone to misinterpretations and misunderstandings.
Researchers create standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy
An international team of researchers has developed a standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy that will improve the care for current and future patients with the condition.
Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness
An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind.
Assessing battery performance: Compared to what?
A team from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, University of Warwick, OVO Energy, Hawaii National Energy Institute, and Jaguar Land Rover reviewed the literature on the various methods used around the world to characterize the performance of lithium-ion batteries to provide insight on best practices.
Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes
Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats.
What do parents of children with cancer search for online?
When a child has cancer, what kind of information do parents seek out?
Does sunscreen compromise vitamin D levels?
Sunscreen can reduce the sun's adverse effects, but there are concerns that it might inhibit the body's production of vitamin D.
AMP recommends minimum set of alleles for all clinical CYP2C9 genotyping testing
AMP and CAP have published consensus, evidence-based recommendations to aid in the design and validation of clinical CYP2C9 assays, promote standardization of testing across different laboratories and improve patient care.
Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits
Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat.
Biodiversity and carbon: perfect together
Biodiversity conservation is often considered to be a co-benefit of protecting carbon sinks such as intact forests to help mitigate climate change.
In lab, SLU researchers flip pain switch in spinal cord cells
Facing an urgent need for safer and more effective therapies for those suffering from debilitating pain in the midst of an opioid crisis, Saint Louis University researchers are on a mission to find a non-narcotic off-switch for pain.
An electric tongue can handle more spicy foods than you can
Spicy food is huge business, and Washington State University researchers have found that an electronic tongue, or e-tongue, is more effective and accurate in taste-testing fiery foods than sensitive human taste buds.
The bird that came back from the dead
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'.
Precise temperature measurements with invisible light
NIST researchers have invented a portable, remarkably stable thermometer capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius.
Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod
Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth that allowed it to crush its prey.
Opioids: Leading cause of pregnancy-related death in new Utah moms
Postpartum women who have previously or currently struggle with substance abuse are at greater risk of overdosing.
Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt
Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China -- the northernmost tree species on Earth -- are growing faster as a result of climate change.
For teens, online bullying worsens sleep and depression
Teens who experience cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, which in turn raises levels of depression, found a University at Buffalo study.
Like submicroscopic spacecrafts: graphene flakes to control neuron activity
Like in a science fiction novel, miniscule spacecrafts able to reach a specific site of the brain and influence the operation of specific types of neurons or drug delivery: graphene flakes, the subject matter of the new study of the group of SISSA professor Laura Ballerini, open up future scenarios in research and for developing possible therapies for neurological diseases.
Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America
A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world.
Specific identification of chronic lung disease in premature babies
Infants born prematurely frequently develop a form of chronic lung disease known as Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.
Routine sickle cell disease screening among migrants may help save lives
Hematologists are zeroing in on the escalating humanitarian crisis in southern Europe by assessing the burden of blood disorders among refugees and identifying strategies to facilitate more timely identification and treatment of refugees with sickle cell disease (SCD).
Marcus regime in organic devices: Interfacial charge transfer mechanism verified
Physicists from the Research Cluster Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) of the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Spain, Belgium and Germany, were able to show in a study how electrons behave in their injection into organic semiconductor films.
Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation
Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study.
Painting a fuller picture of how antibiotics kill
MIT researchers have used machine-learning algorithms to discover a secondary mechanism that helps some antibiotics kill bacteria.
New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs
Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from.
Appendix removal associated with development of Parkinson's disease
Patients who had their appendix removed were more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those whose appendix remained in place, according to the largest study to address the relationship between the two conditions.
Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness
Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
Location is everything for plant cell differentiation
During development, plant cell differentiation is guided by location rather than lineage.
Patient registries could help control spread of antibiotic bacteria
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) -- bacteria that have high levels of resistance to most antibiotics -- could be reduced if only 25 percent of the largest health care facilities in a region used a patient registry, a database that can track which patients are carrying CRE.
Study shows one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol
Using electronic health records from the Indiana Network for Patient Care, a new population health study of entire state found that one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol.
HSS researchers advance understandings of the cellular mechanisms driving rheumatoid arthritis
Newly identified subsets of cell types present in the joint tissue of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and how they interact may help develop future precision medicine strategies.
New treatment could become first targeted therapy designed for 'untreatable' childhood brain cancer
A new type of drug that targets a genetic weakness in an untreatable childhood brain cancer could become the first ever treatment designed to target the disease.
To cheat or not to cheat? Researchers uncover the moral dilemmas of doping
Elite athletes are less likely to take banned substances if they consider the morality of what they are doing, and not just the health consequences of doping, according to a new study led by the University of Birmingham and funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).
Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop
Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region.
With uncanny accuracy, computer model predicts how certain policies impact air pollution
A multi-institution team unveiled a new tool for understanding and controlling the health and climate impacts of shipping goods -- a source not only of greenhouse gases but of soot and smog threatening our health.
Study questions current regulations on light pollution and calls for paradigm shift
Researchers from the Universities of Granada and Krakow have warned that Spain's current legislation on light pollution fails to take into account all the necessary factors -- including human vision itself.
How to generate a brain of correct size and composition
To build the neocortex, a brain area involved in higher cognitive functions, stem cells produce billions of neurons of various types.
Secrets of fluorescent microalgae could lead to super-efficient solar cells
Tiny light-emitting microalgae, found in the ocean, could hold the secret to the next generation of organic solar cells, according to new research carried out at the universities of Birmingham and Utrecht.
Researchers create 'force field' for super materials
Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials -- graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT).
How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests
Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation.
Adverse childhood experiences negatively impact adults with lupus
Adults with lupus who report having had adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as abuse, neglect and household challenges, report higher disease activity, depression and poorer overall health compared to those without such experiences, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Obesity in early pregnancy linked to pregnancy complications
In a prospective study published in Obesity of 18,481 pregnant women in China who had never given birth before, obesity in early pregnancy was linked to higher risks of spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and large birth weight in newborns.
New HIV vaccine strategy 'pumps' the immune system
A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model.
How Nipah virus spreads from person to person: Lessons from 14 years of investigations
The deadly Nipah virus, which is carried by bats and occasionally infects people, is more likely to be transmitted from person to person when the infected patient is older, male and/or has breathing difficulties, according to a study co-led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
BU finds tight pants and pubic-hair removal increase risk of vulvodynia
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that the risk of vulvodynia is nearly doubled by wearing tight-fitting jeans or pants four or more times a week, or removing hair from the mons pubis.
Fooling nerve cells into acting normal
In a new study, scientists at the University of Missouri have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally.
Milk expression within 8 hours associated with lactation success for VLBW infants in NICU
A study led by physician researchers at Boston Medical Center has shown that first milk expression within eight hours of giving birth is associated with the highest probability of mothers of very low-birth-weight infants being able to provide milk throughout hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit.
Biomarker may help identify men with prostate cancer at greater risk of tumor metastasis
Ten percent of patients with prostate cancer develop locally invasive and metastatic disease, which increases the severity of the disease and likelihood of death and limits treatment options.
Scientists locate brain area where value decisions are made
Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have pinpointed the brain area responsible for value decisions that are made based on past experiences.
Illinois researcher Amy LaViers introduces novel perspective in robotic capability
University of Illinois Assistant Professor Amy LaViers has introduced a new point of view from which to observe robotic capabilities in her paper, 'Counts of Mechanical, External Configurations Compared to Computational, Internal Configurations in Natural and Artificial Systems.'
VA-led study of combat personnel with brain injuries pinpoints abnormal brain waves
A VA-led study finds that veterans and service members with a history of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury have much higher levels of abnormally fast brain waves in a region that plays a key role in consciousness.
VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia
Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research by the University of Kent has discovered.
THE SIGNS study by Duke-NUS researchers identify factors affecting active and productive ageing
Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School's Centre for Ageing Research and Education (CARE) conducted a longitudinal study between 2016-2017 looking at factors influencing health, well-being, activity and productivity levels in older Singaporeans.
A new view of wintertime air pollution
The team's unexpected finding suggests that in the US West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire.
Personalized 'Eye-in-a-Dish' models reveal genetic underpinnings of macular degeneration
Using stem cells derived from six people, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers recapitulated retinal cells in the lab.
Copper oxide photocathodes: laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss
Solar cells and photocathodes made of copper oxide might in theory attain high efficiencies for solar energy conversion.
Mathematical framework explores how the brain keeps a beat
A new mathematical model demonstrates how neurons in the brain could work together to learn and keep a musical beat.
New brain tumor imaging technique uses protein found in scorpion venom
A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial.
Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage
Research funded in part by the US Army identified properties in materials that could one day lead to applications such as more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information even after a device has been powered off.
The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects.
Scientists discover a new class of single-atom nanozymes
A research team led by Prof. DONG Shaojun from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a new class of single-atom nanozymes, which integrates state-of-the-art single-atom technology with intrinsic enzyme-like active sites.
Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here's why
A genetic variation known to affect sickle cell disease might be the reason why some college football players experience adverse clinical outcomes during periods of extreme physical exertion and others do not.
Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance
Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development.
Serotonin boosts neuronal powerplants protecting against stress
Research from the Vaidya and Kolthur-Seetharam groups (TIFR) shows that the neurotransmitter serotonin enhances the production and functions of neuronal mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, and protect against stress.
Minimally invasive procedure shows promise in combatting obesity
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG), a relatively new, minimally invasive weight-loss procedure, resulted in significant total body weight loss in the first long-term study to follow patients' progress over five years, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019.
Childhood maltreatment linked to e-cigarette use during young adulthood
Young adults who experienced maltreatment during childhood are more prone to use e-cigarettes, according to a study published in The American Journal on Addictions.
How the cytoplasm separates from the yolk
The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of the fish larva.
Back to the sources of neural diversity
The diversity of the tasks the cortex can perform is reflected in the diversity of the neurons that compose it.
Bullying linked to student's pain medication use
In a school-based survey study of all students in grades 6, 8, and 10 in Iceland, the use of pain medications was significantly higher among bullied students even when controlling for the amount of pain they felt, as well as age, gender, and socioeconomic status.
Methane-consuming bacteria could be the future of fuel
Northwestern University researchers have found that the enzyme responsible for the methane-methanol conversion in methanotrophic bacteria catalyzes the reaction at a site that contains just one copper ion.
Stem cell scientists clear another hurdle in creating transplant arteries
Recent work highlights a better way to grow smooth muscle cells, one of the two cellular building blocks of arteries, from pluripotent stem cells.
When people get along, fish thrive
Investments in building community capacity that focus on establishing communication, trust, and a shared understanding among direct resource competitors may improve ecological conditions in coral reef fisheries.
'Fire streaks' ever more real in the collisions of atomic nuclei and protons
Collisions of lead nuclei take place under extreme physical conditions.
The origins of neuronal diversity in the developing mouse brain
They way neural progenitor cells produce more daughter cells, of different types, shifts with the individual neuroprogenitor's development, according to a new study of mouse brains.
New connection found between NAFLD and rare pregnancy complication
A new link has been found between a rare and serious condition that typically presents as itchy palms during pregnancy and the world's most common chronic liver disease, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019.
New clues about how ancient galaxies lit up the Universe
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that some of the Universe's earliest galaxies were brighter than expected.
Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
A study led by Indiana University researchers reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive.
First randomized controlled trial of FMT for obesity shows potential progress
Using capsules filled with fecal matter from a lean donor, researchers successfully changed some of the composition of the gut microbiota of patients with obesity, a possible step toward a new treatment for weight loss.
Predicting disease transmission from bushmeat
Trade of bushmeat and other wildlife for human consumption presents a unique set of challenges to policymakers who are confronted with multiple trade-offs between conservation, food security, food safety, culture, and tradition.
Substrate defects key to growth of 2D materials
Creating two-dimentional materials large enough to use in electronics is a challenge despite huge effort but now, Penn State researchers have discovered a method for improving the quality of one class of 2D materials, with potential to achieve wafer-scale growth in the future.
Increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder among children with immigrant father
Children born in Finland who had an immigrant father were two times more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than those with two Finnish parents, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku in Finland.
Gravitational waves leave a detectable mark, physicists say
New research shows that gravitational waves leave behind plenty of 'memories' that could help detect them even after they've passed.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.