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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 10, 2019


Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy
An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland.
Storm water banking could help Texas manage floods and droughts
A study by The University of Texas at Austin has quantified the amount of water flowing in major Texas rivers during heavy rains and found that there is enough room in coastal aquifers to store most of it.
Opioid doctor and pharmacy 'shoppers' may also shop at home, study finds
As states crack down on doctor and pharmacy 'shopping' by people who misuse opioids, a new study reveals how often those individuals may still be able to find opioids to misuse in their family medicine cabinets.
Study explores the use of robots and artificial intelligence to understand the deep-sea
Artificial intelligence (AI) could help scientists shed new light on the variety of species living on the ocean floor, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.
Can recreational sports really make you a better student?
A new Michigan State University study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year.
999 trial shows value of live video streaming
Using live video streaming from the scene of accidents and medical emergencies to the dispatch team of a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) has public support and the potential to be rolled out across the UK's ambulance network , according to the team behind a scientific study.
Unpacking the links: Chronic stress, fertility and the 'hunger hormone'
A new study suggests high levels of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates appetite and is also released during stress, could be harmful to some aspects of reproductive function.
Cancer screening rates decline when patients see doctors later in day
Decision fatigue and doctors falling behind schedule may lead to lower cancer screening rates, Penn study finds.
Two types of mid-latitude wave trains lead to extreme heat in South Korea and southern-central Japan
South Korea and southern-central Japan are frequently affected by extreme heat, and the extreme heat in these two regions tend to occur simultaneously.
Computing faster with quasi-particles
In collaboration with researchers from Harvard University, researchers from the University of Würzburg have made an important step on the road to topological quantum computers.
Manipulating superconductivity using a 'mechanic' and an 'electrician'
Strongly correlated materials can change their resistivity from infinity to zero with minute changes in conditions.
A case of the chimp sniffles or major outbreak? Syndromic surveillance may hold the key
Two sniffling chimps could be one too many for a wild chimpanzee community susceptible to respiratory disease outbreaks, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Minnesota.
Nanotubes enable travel of Huntington's protein
Nanotube tunnels extend like bridges for the toxic Huntington's disease protein, and spring back after delivery, a new study finds.
Measuring quality of life after pediatric kidney transplant
After receiving a kidney transplant, children may experience worrisome quality-of-life changes that underscore the importance of screening transplant recipients for psychosocial function, according to Children's research presented during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.
Smallest pixels ever created could light up color-changing buildings
The smallest pixels yet created -- a million times smaller than those in smartphones, made by trapping particles of light under tiny rocks of gold -- could be used for new types of large-scale flexible displays, big enough to cover entire buildings.
Researchers discover the Achilles' heel of an aggressive brain cancer
Researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, have discovered a chink in the armor of the tumor cells of glioblastoma, a lethal brain cancer.
Time of day associated with physicians ordering cancer screenings, patients completing them
The time of day of a primary care appointment was associated with the likelihood of a physician ordering cancer screenings and of patients completing those screenings in this study of 33 practices with patients eligible for breast or colorectal cancer screening.
Inspired by a soft body of a leech -- a wall-climbing robot
A research team led by Associate Professor Tomoaki Mashimo at Toyohashi University of Technology has successfully developed a leech-shaped robot, 'LEeCH,' which can climb vertical walls.
Cognitive enhancers to boost abilities at work considered acceptable by the public
The general public largely views the use of cognitive enhancers such as Adderall as an acceptable practice when used by adults in the workplace, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine neurologists, which published this week in AJOB Neuroscience.
New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C
Researchers studying hepatitis C virus have introduced small mutations into mouse liver cells to make the animals more susceptible to the virus, a step toward using mice in hepatitis C vaccine research.
Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known.
Following DASH diet can reduce heart failure risk in people under 75
A diet proven to have beneficial effects on high blood pressure also may reduce the risk of heart failure in people under age 75, according to a study led by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.
Research spotlights the role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance
An article in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide-resistant weeds.
Eat or be eaten: Street food vendors resist and adapt to changing society
Research from Japan's Kanazawa University examined various ways in which Indonesian street food vendors try to survive and adapt amid urbanization.
A new system for treating type 1 diabetes mellitus
Thanks to an innovative system of magnetic microcapsule separation, the Nanobiocel-CIBER BNN research group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country in collaboration with the BIOMICS group, also of the UPV/EHU, has managed to reduce the volume of microcapsule implants containing insulin-producing pancreatic cells by nearly 80%.
A metal sheet stamping simulation promises improved car part production
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University used the most up-to-date simulation techniques to determine how to make the best tools to stamp complex shapes into metal sheets without the resulting parts twisting out of shape.
Study finds Wi-Fi location affects online privacy behavior
Does sitting in a coffee shop versus at home influence a person's willingness to disclose private information online?
Location and brand affect people's trust in cloud services
People's stereotypes regarding different locations around the world influence whether they feel secure in storing their data in cloud service centers in those locations, according to researchers at Penn State, who also found that stereotypes regarding brand authority influence people's trust in cloud services.
A dance of two: Tailoring interactions between remote fluids of excitons
An international collaboration involving European, Israeli, and US scientists realize for the first time strong and directionally dependent interactions in quantum liquids of excitons, which contrasts with the spatial isotropy of the coupling between charged particles.
Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars
In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to Penn State researchers.
NASA Northern quadrant strength in Tropical Cyclone Lili
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in Tropical Cyclone Lili as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean.
Better microring sensors for optical applications
Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity.
E-cigarette use by young adults linked to childhood maltreatment
A new study led by VCU researchers finds young adults with a history of childhood abuse or neglect are more prone to using e-cigarettes during the transition to adulthood.
Treatment to restore natural heartbeat could be on the horizon for heart failure
A new therapy to re-engage the heart's natural electrical pathways -- instead of bypassing them -- could mean more treatment options for heart failure patients who also suffer from electrical disturbances, such as arrhythmias, according to research led by the University of Chicago Medicine.
Good sleep quality and good mood lead to good working memory with age
A team of psychologists has found strong associations between working memory -- a fundamental building block of a functioning mind -- and three health-related factors: sleep, age, and depressed mood.
New UM study highlights fundamental challenges of living with wildfire
Wildfires can have dramatic impacts on Western landscapes and communities, but human values determine whether the changes caused by fire are desired or dreaded.
HIV prevention drug can curb the epidemic for high-risk groups in India
A new study by an international research team suggests that making pre-exposure prophylaxis available to men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs in India may be a cost-effective way of curbing the HIV epidemic there.
Receiving weekend food improves school attendance among children living with hunger
Children living in food-insecure households are more likely to attend school on Fridays if they're participating in a food-distribution program that provides them with backpacks of meals for the weekend, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.
Expert panel calls for increased transparency so consumers can identify quality probiotics
Probiotics are increasingly being researched and marketed as functional ingredients to enhance health.
Study: Some biologic treatments for psoriasis may be safer for patients
In the largest study of its kind, Erica D. Dommasch, M.D., M.P.H., a dermatologist in the Department of Dermatology at BIDMC, and colleagues found a decreased risk of infection in patients with psoriasis using some of the newer, more targeted medications compared to those taking methotrexate, a drug widely used since the 1960s as a first line treatment for moderate-to-severe psoriasis.
Study sheds new light on urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women
A UT Southwestern study suggests why urinary tract infections (UTIs) have such a high recurrence rate in postmenopausal women -- several species of bacteria can invade the bladder walls.
A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods
A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods.
Research on repetitive worm behavior may have implications for understanding human disease
Studying microscopic worms, Rockefeller scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives repetitive behavior -- providing potential clues for understanding some human psychiatric conditions.
New study shows scientists who selfie garner more public trust
Many scientists today have embraced social media as tools to communicate their research and to engage broader audiences in scientific discovery and its outcomes.
Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers.
Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs
Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the UK, according to research led by ZSL's Institute of Zoology, UCL and Queen Mary University of London published today in Global Change Biology.
What is association of age with risk of death for ICU patients?
This study of nearly 134,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in France examined the association of age with risk of death in the hospital and then three months and three years after discharge.
Our history in the stars
Astronomers map the substance aluminum monoxide (AlO) in a cloud around a distant young star -- Origin Source I.
Prince Charming's kiss unlocking brain's regenerative potential?
Kyoto University researchers find that 'waves' of Hes1 and Ascl1 gene expression control the quiescent and active state of adult neural stem cells.
Trial remedies racial disparities in treatment for early-stage lung and breast cancer
UNC School of Medicine's Samuel Cykert, MD, a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, co-led a five-year, multi-institutional trial aimed at reducing the disparity in treatment and outcomes for black versus white lung and breast cancer patients.
People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information
Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors.
Army discovery opens path to safer batteries
In the latest issue of the journal Nature, Army researchers and the University of Maryland demonstrate a transformative step in battery technology with the identification of a new cathode chemistry.
Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces
Wild pigs -- a mix of wild boar and domestic swine -- are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.
Comparison of global climatologies confirms warming of the global ocean
A report describes the main features of the recently published World Ocean Experiment-Argo Global Hydrographic Climatology.
Statins' potential to treat MS unrelated to lowering cholesterol
The widely prescribed statin, simvastatin, can medically help patients with secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS) -- for reasons that might be unrelated to the drug's intended cholesterol lowering affects, a UCL study has found.
New efficient way to engineer nanostructures mimicking natural immune response complexes
Collaboration between Novo Nordisk and Professor Kurt Gothelf's laboratory at Aarhus University yields novel method to engineer large multi-antibody-like nanostructures using DNA nanotechnology.
A cup of Joe and you're good to go!
Latte, cappuccino or short black, a morning coffee is an essential for many people looking to kick start their day.
Making a meal of it: Mosquito spit protein controls blood feeding
Researchers led by Kanazawa University developed a transgenic approach to inactivating the mosquito salivary protein AAPP.
Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed
Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America -- often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants.
2D insulators with ferromagnetism are rare; researchers just identified a new one
Collaborating scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Princeton University have discovered a new layered ferromagnetic semiconductor, a rare type of material that holds great promise for next-generation electronic technologies.
Post-bypass survival linked to civil status and class
Civil status, education, and income are factors shown to be clearly associated with duration of survival after a bypass operation.

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