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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 13, 2019


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Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention.
A step for a promising new battery to store clean energy
Researchers have built a more efficient, more reliable potassium-oxygen battery, a step toward a potential solution for energy storage on the nation's power grid and longer-lasting batteries in cell phones and laptops.
Study shows people fail to recognise male postnatal depression
A new study shows that people are almost twice as likely to correctly identify signs of postnatal depression in women than in men.
Brain researchers seek 'fingerprints' of severe mental diseases
McLean Hospital investigates brain network connectivity in patients with psychotic disorders.
The rich are outliving the poor in both Norway and USA
Inequalities in life expectancy by income in Norway were substantial, and increased between 2005 and 2015, according to a study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in collaboration with the Institute For Health Metrics And Evaluation (IHME).
We are more envious of things that haven't happened yet
We are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is an option to overcome barriers of traditional cardiac rehabilitation
Home-based cardiac rehabilitation may be an option for many who would benefit from cardiac rehabilitation after a heart attack or other heart procedure but can't attend medical center-based programs.
Prior eating disorders linked to long-term depression risk for mothers
A history of eating disorders and body image concerns before or during pregnancy are associated with future depressive symptoms among mothers, finds a new UCL-led study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.
New insights into treatment targets for men with advanced prostate cancers
A study published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Precision Oncology, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) journal, outlines findings from the largest-ever prospective genomic analysis of advanced prostate cancer tumors.
Political controversies about marginalized groups increase bullying in youths
Scientists have uncovered new evidence that heated political discourse over proposed laws involving marginalized groups, such as debates about the rights of LGBT people, can contribute to an increase in bullying linked to students' identity in schools.
Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers
Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or cannot read at all (complete illiterates)?
Obesity: The key role of a brain protein revealed
Regardless of how much you exercise or how balanced your diet is, controlling your weight is more brain-related than you might have thought.
Could locking all household guns reduce youth suicides, unintentional firearm deaths?
An increase in the number of firearm owners who live with children who lock up all their household guns could be associated with a reduction in youth firearm deaths by suicide and unintentional injury.
Long-term consequences of Zika virus infection
Mice exposed to the Zika virus during later stages of gestation present behaviors reminiscent of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, according to a study of genetically diverse animals.
OU study expands understanding of bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system
A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering.
Software library to serve for faster chemical reaction processing
Big Data has become ubiquitous in recent years, and especially so in disciplines with heterogeneous and complex data patterns.
Biochemical compound responsible for blood pressure drop in sepsis is discovered
International research group demonstrates the involvement of singlet molecular oxygen in vasodilation, causing a sharp decline in blood pressure in severe inflammatory processes such as sepsis.
Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae
Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded.
BU finds screenings for social determinants of health need to be tailored to clinics
An estimated 70 percent of the variation in healthcare outcomes is attributable to social determinants----but it is only in recent years that healthcare settings have begun formally looking at these factors to better understand and treat patients.
Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production
Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).
Texting while driving common among millennial, older parents
A distracted driving survey of millennial parents (ages 22 to 37) and older parents (37 and up) shows that most parents had read and written texts while driving in the part 30 days but millennial parents had higher survey scores that reflected more reckless driving behavior, including the use of email, social media and maps plus speed of travel.
New Mexico cancer patients have lower survival rate, study finds
Researchers at the Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine (BCOM) have found that cancer patients in New Mexico have lower chances of survival when compared to the rest of the nation.
How viable is your liver after you die?
In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics.
Five things to know about melanoma
'Five things to know about ... melanoma' in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides a brief overview of this malignant skin cancer for physicians and patients.
Want to expand your toddler's vocabulary? Find another child
Children glean all kinds of information from the people around them.
Physician procedure volume linked to outcomes after surgical abortion
Although surgically induced abortion is a low-risk procedure, women whose physician infrequently performs it have almost twice the risk of severe complications, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Turning off growth to make flowers grow
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report the final epigenetic events that terminate stem cell growth for proper flower development.
New Ohio University study profiles the changing face of suicide within the state
According to a new study released by The Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health (The Alliance), suicide's identity is increasingly comprised of individuals both young and old, with suicide rates rising more than 36 percent for those ages 20 to 29 and approximately 57 percent for those aged 60 or older in the last 10 years.
Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds
Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy.
Underwater power generation
Underwater vehicles, diving robots, and detectors require their own energy supply to operate for long periods independent of ships.
A new treatment for stroke in mice reduces brain damage and promotes motor recovery
New research shows that brain fluids can be normalized with adrenergic receptor antagonists, a combination of drugs to block the activity of (nor)adrenaline in the brain.
Family dynamics: Molecules from the same family have different effects in cancer prognosis
Researchers at Hiroshima University have found that different levels of two molecules of the same family -- TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 -- can influence prognosis of liposarcoma.
The death of a close friend hits harder than we think
The trauma caused by the death of a close friend endures four times longer than previously believed, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).
1 in 5 civil monetary penalties due to EMTALA violations involved psychiatric emergencies
Nearly one in five civil monetary penalty settlements related to Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) violations involved psychiatric emergencies.
NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Ann threatening Queensland
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ann in the Coral Sea, off the east coast of Queensland, Australia.
Physicists discover new type of spin waves
Advances in IT technologies are hampered by the ever increasing demand for energy and by fundamental limits on miniaturization.
New recommendations for a thyroid and cardiovascular disease research agenda
New Recommendations for a Thyroid and Cardiovascular Disease Research Agenda have been co-published in Thyroid® and Circulation.
How to starve triple negative breast cancer
A team of Brazilian researchers has developed a strategy that slows the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells by cutting them off from two major food sources.
Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber
Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest.
Distracted driving more frequent among millennial than older parents
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital sought to understand and compare the texting and driving patterns of millennial parents versus older parents.
Catch a virus by its tail
At a glance: Research uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the deadliest human RNA viruses to orchestrate the precise copying of the individual pieces of their viral genome and replicate.
Signals to noise in acoustic vehicles alerting systems
If you've wished for a quieter commute, you may be in luck: The low-emission electric vehicles of tomorrow are expected to lower noise pollution as well as air pollution.
Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology
A research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed an approach to co-culture a complex human gut microbiome in direct contact with intestinal tissue for at least five days using 'organ-on-a-chip' (Organ Chip) microfluidic culture technology.
Bone cells suppress cancer metastases
A subpopulation of bone cells releases factors that can halt the growth of breast cancer that's traveled to the bone, putting the cells in stasis.
Tomato pan-genome makes bringing flavor back easier
Store-bought tomatoes don't have much flavor. Now, scientists from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) may have spotlighted the solution by developing the tomato pan-genome, mapping almost 5,000 previously undocumented genes, including genes for flavor.
Measuring chromosome imbalance could clarify cancer prognosis
Researchers have found that higher levels of aneuploidy lead to much greater lethality among prostate cancer patients.
Echo chambers may not be as dangerous as you think, new study finds
Following the 2016 presidential election, echo chambers have oft been blamed for the polarization of contemporary American politics.
Alzheimer therapy from Jülich passes another important test
The Alzheimer drug candidate PRI-002 developed at Forschungszentrum Jülich has successfully completed Phase I of clinical research involving healthy volunteers.
Families with a higher socioeconomic position have a greater risk of exposure to chemicals
A European study analyses the exposure of 1,300 mothers and their children to 41 different chemical contaminants
'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field
Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can 'be scientists,' but remain more confident that they can 'do science.'
BTI scientists create new genomic resource for improving tomatoes
Tomato breeders have traditionally emphasized production traits, like larger and more fruits per plant.
Preventing cell death as novel therapeutic strategy for rheumatoid arthritis
A collaborative study by research groups from the University of Cologne, VIB, Ghent University, the Βiomedical Sciences Research Center 'Alexander Fleming' in Athens and the University of Tokyo identified a new molecular mechanism causing rheumatoid arthritis.
Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study
Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable.
Room for thought: Brain region that watches for walls identified
To move through the world, you need a sense of your surroundings, especially of the constraints that restrict your movement: the walls, ceiling and other barriers that define the geometry of the navigable space around you.
Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost
Many US households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy.
25 US counties identified as most at risk for measles outbreaks
Twenty-five counties across the country have been identified to be most at risk for a measles outbreak due to low-vaccination rates compounded by a high volume of international travel, according to an analysis by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University.
New study finds people are using Twitter to bridge political divides
Given the current atmosphere of political polarization, conventional wisdom suggests that conversations about politics -- especially those taking place online -- are both unpleasant and unproductive.
Research sheds light on UK's new unsustainable viewing habits
A team of computing researchers at Lancaster University has taken the closest look yet at the nature and extent of how household viewing habits have changed -- providing valuable new evidence for the researchers, who are interested in our changing viewing habits and how this links to the huge increases in Internet data traffic
How acoustics detected artillery in WWI
During WWI, William Lawrence Bragg led the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely throughout the British army.
Study explores privatization of public systems of justice
A new study sought to determine the points at which individuals who encounter public systems of justice are charged by private entities.
Keeping things in proportion: Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling
A research team led by Hiroshima University found that inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2, backed up by endoplasmic reticulum protein Lnp1, acts as a valve to control the flow of the membrane into and out of the nuclear envelope.
WVU researcher studies incurable blood disease usually diagnosed in children
Most people with Fanconi anemia are diagnosed before they turn 12 but don't live past 30.
Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds
Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
New tool to predict epileptic seizures in pregnancy could save lives
A new risk calculator for pregnant women with epilepsy, developed by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, has been found to accurately predict the risk of seizures during pregnancy and up to six weeks after delivery, and could save the lives of mothers and babies.
Workplace interventions may improve sleep habits and duration for employees
Simple workplace interventions, like educating employees about the importance of sleep and providing behavioral sleep strategies, may produce beneficial results, according to a new review.
Skoltech researchers developed new perovskite-inspired semiconductors for electronic devices
The collaborative effort of researchers from Skoltech, SB RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, and RAS Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics translated into the development of advanced lead-free semiconductors for solar cells, based on complex antimony and bismuth halides.
Radioisotope couple for tumor diagnosis and therapy
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics -- a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements.
Is being bullied as teen associated with growing up in areas of income inequality?
A survey study of about 874,000 adolescents from 40 European and North American countries suggests growing up in areas with income inequality was associated with being bullied after accounting for some other mitigating factors.
Quantum world-first: researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon
After being the first team to create a two-qubit gate in silicon in 2015, UNSW Sydney engineers are breaking new ground again: they have measured the accuracy of silicon two-qubit operations for the first time -- and their results confirm the promise of silicon for quantum computing.
Detecting dementia's damaging effects before it's too late
Patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called Primary Progressive Aphasia, or PPA, show abnormalities in brain function in areas that look structurally normal on an MRI scan.
Reviews highlight new advances in our understanding of focal and sclerotic bone diseases
A new special edition of 'Calcified Tissue International' provides expert commentary and insight into the advances in the knowledge of several rare focal and sclerotic bone diseases including Paget's disease of bone and related syndromes, fibrous dysplasia of bone and McCune-Albright syndrome, Melorheostosis and Osteopoikilosis, chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis, as well as Camurati-Engelmann disease.
Weighing up trade-offs between food security and climate mitigation
IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues in Japan to clarify the impacts of stringent climate mitigation policies on food security.
Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef
Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe.
The Lancet: Preventative antibiotics after assisted childbirth almost halve maternal infection rate and reduce overall antibiotic use
Giving a single dose of preventative antibiotics to all women after childbirth involving forceps or vacuum extraction could prevent almost half of maternal infections including sepsis--equivalent to over 7,000 maternal infections every year in the UK, and around 5,000 in the USA.
Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone
Militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication.
When Possible, Upper and Lower GI Endoscopies Should Be Done on Same Day
If your car needs work on its front and rear axles, it's obviously more convenient, efficient and cost effective to have both repairs done at the same time.
Common food additive found to affect gut microbiota
Experts call for better regulation of a common additive in foods and medicine, as research reveals it can impact the gut microbiota and contribute to inflammation in the colon, which could trigger diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.
Study: Glassy menagerie of particles in beach sands near Hiroshima is fallout debris
A years-long study that involved scientists and experiments at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley concludes that an odd assortment of particles found in beach sands in Japan are most likely fallout debris from the 1945 Hiroshima A-bomb blast.
Princeton scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer
Princeton researchers have discovered that Pseudomonas bacteria can detect the speed (shear rate) of flow regardless of the force.
The moon is quaking as it shrinks
A new analysis suggests that the moon is actively shrinking and producing moonquakes along thousands of cliffs called thrust faults spread over the moon's surface.
New research accurately predicts Australian wheat yield months before harvest
Topping the list of Australia's major crops, wheat is grown on more than half the country's cropland and is a key export commodity.
Being bullied as a teen is associated with growing up in areas of income inequality
Growing up in areas with income inequality is associated with being bullied, according to a new study, which surveyed approximately 874,000 children in 40 medium and high income countries in Europe, North America and Israel.
Trade could be key to balancing conservation of freshwater sources and food security
An IIASA study published in the journal Nature Sustainability today, evaluated whether water for the environment could be prioritized under growing competition from other sectors.
Just like toothpaste: fluoride radically improves the stability of perovskite solar cells
Solar cells made of perovskite hold much promise for the future of solar energy.
Study details bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections
A new finding by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs).
CDC concurs with panel led by Regenstrief scientist on misapplication of opioid guidelines
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is clarifying its guidelines on opioid prescribing, citing the findings of a review panel led by Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kurt Kroenke, M.D.
BU finds rare gene mutations may prevent heart disease
A kind of rare gene mutation may prevent heart disease, according to a new study co-led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher.
Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity
Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.
Cost-effectiveness analysis of 12 cervical cancer screenings
This cost-effectiveness analysis incorporates women's preferences and estimates quality of life and economic outcomes for 12 cervical cancer screening strategies.
New data platform illuminates history of humans' environmental impact
Animal remains found at archaeological sites tell the millennia-long story of how humans have hunted, domesticated and transported wildlife, altered landscapes and responded to environmental changes such as shifting temperatures and sea levels.
T2Bacteria panel rapidly and accurately diagnoses common bloodstream infections
In a clinical trial, the T2Bacteria Panel showed promise for rapidly and accurately diagnosing bloodstream infections or sepsis caused by five common bacteria.
A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance
A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki has found a ground breaking new method to facilitate the observation of photosynthetic dynamics in vegetation.
Half of all patients with syncope have CT head performed with a yield of 1.2% to 3.8%
More than half of patients with syncope underwent CT head with a diagnostic yield of 1.1% to 3.8%.
How mutations lead to neurodegenerative disease
Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease.
Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures
When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M.
New approach uses magnetic beads to treat preeclampsia
A new proof of concept study shows that functionalized magnetic beads reduced blood levels of a harmful molecule by 40%, which doubled the effect of a different molecule that aids blood vessel function, opening new perspectives for the treatment of preeclampsia.
Artificial intelligence could select heart failure patients for expensive treatment
Artificial intelligence (AI) has shown promise to select heart failure patients for expensive treatments to prevent lethal arrhythmias, reports a study presented today at ICNC 2019.
Bladder drug linked to atherosclerosis in mice
A drug used in the treatment of overactive bladder can accelerate atheroclerosis in mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Why Hodgkin's lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably
Although classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery.
Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower
In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals.
Humanwide program uses data-driven, integrated team approach to predict, prevent disease
A Stanford Medicine pilot program combining cutting-edge tools of biomedicine with a collaborative, team-based method, offers a new approach to personalized health care that captures the promise of Precision Health: to predict, prevent and treat disease based on the individual patient.
Stopping inflammation in its tracks: A leap forward for new anti-inflammatory drugs
Treatments for chronic inflammatory diseases are one step closer as University of Queensland researchers discover a way to stop inflammation in its tracks.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...