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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 15, 2019


Twitter image colors and content could help identify users with depression, anxiety
Penn study shows users who score high on a depression and anxiety survey often post photos that are less aesthetically appealing, less vivid in color or display little depth of field
Clinicians could prescribe fitness apps to help cancer survivor's exercise
Fitness apps could be prescribed by clinicians to help patients recovering from cancer increase their physical activity levels, new research in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship reports.
Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans.
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Washable, wearable 'batteries': based on cheap, safe and environmentally-friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics, have been developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge.
Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells
A new way to cleanly separate out cancer cells from a blood sample enables comprehensive genetic profiling of the cancer cells, which could help doctors target tumors and monitor treatments more effectively.
Companies benefit from giving congressional testimony, study finds
Researchers studied the effect of congressional testimony given by representatives of large companies and found that investors responded favorably to several aspects of testimony.
New AI sees like a human, filling in the blanks
Computer scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have taught an artificial intelligence agent how to do something that usually only humans can do -- take a few quick glimpses around and infer its whole environment, a skill necessary for the development of effective search-and-rescue robots that one day can improve the effectiveness of dangerous missions.
Big data helps identify better way to research breast cancer's spread
Michigan State University researchers are analyzing large volumes of data, often referred to as big data, to determine better research models to fight the spread of breast cancer and test potential drugs.
Framework improves 'continual learning' for artificial intelligence
Researchers have developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence (AI) systems to better learn new tasks while 'forgetting' less of what it has learned regarding previous tasks.
Coherent? Voice disorders significantly affect listeners, too
Researchers conducted a study to see if there are differences in speech intelligibility (a listener's ability to recover a speaker's message) in healthy voices compared to those who have voice disorders like hoarseness.
Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment
By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought.
Applying precious metal catalysts economically
Researchers have developed a new method of using rare and expensive catalysts as sparingly as possible.
China's Chang'E 4 mission discovers new 'secrets' from far side of the moon
A lunar lander named for the Chinese goddess of the moon may have lessened the mystery of the far side of the moon.
Scientists suss out the secrets of human screams
Screaming is well-studied in animals, but much less is known about how human screams function in communication, or how similar or different human screams are from those of other species.
What are the neurological side effects of CAR T-cell therapy?
A team at Brigham and Women's Hospital recently cataloged the neurological symptoms of patients who had received CAR T-cell therapy to better understand its neurotoxic side effects.
Membrane madness: The ins and outs of moving materials through the cell
The cell membrane is a fatty layer that forms a border between the inside of the cell, its various structures and the outside world.
Brown undergraduate researcher teaches robots handwriting and drawing
Working with a Brown University faculty member, an undergraduate student developed an algorithm that enables robots to reproduce human-like pen strokes just by looking at images of handwriting or sketches.
Century-scale deep-water circulation dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean
Dr Moriaki Yasuhara, Dr Hisayo Okahashi, and Dr Huai-Hsuan May Huang from School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with scientists in Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Duke University, and US Geological Survey have recently reported their discovery on a key driver of past and perhaps future abrupt climate change that is deep-water dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean in the journal Geology.
Molecular basis of brain dysfunction and embryo malformation associated with thalidomide
Scientists at the Tokyo Medical University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology identified the molecule involved in thalidomide-related dysfunctions associated with in utero brain and organ development.
Johns Hopkins researchers find widely 'inconsistent' use of antibodies in lab experiments
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Center say they have affirmed widespread inconsistencies in the use of a common laboratory procedure called immunohistochemical staining, and say the variations are making many laboratory experiments unreliable.
New clinical pathway for cancer patients leads to better outcomes, lower health care costs
A new clinical pathway for cancer patients at Christiana Care Health System's Helen F.
What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins
Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies.
Stoic, resourceful -- and at risk for suicide
A new study led by a University of Georgia researcher, in collaboration with epidemiologists from the Georgia Department of Public Health, has identified some common factors associated with farmer suicide that may help health providers develop strategies to reduce suicide risk.
China unlikely to curb fentanyl exports in short-term
China has pledged to crack down on the illicit export of the synthetic opioid fentanyl to the US, but a new analysis finds that may be difficult given the way that China regulates its larger drug and chemical industries.
Army researcher defends dissertation, pursues safeguarded technology
An electronics engineer at the Army's corporate research laboratory successfully defended his doctoral dissertation, while working to safeguard fielded technology for the Soldiers of today and tomorrow.
Inflammation induces anhedonia in women but not men
Inflammation reduces the brain's response to rewards in women, but not in men, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.
SAEM 2019:Gun safety, over testing and more
Michigan Medicine experts highlighted new research during the keynote address and plenary session at the annual Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting.
Bristol academic cracks Voynich code, solving century-old mystery of medieval text
A University of Bristol academic has succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed - by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript.
Enzyme PHLPP2 could be a viable drug target for treating prostate cancer
Researchers propose a new druggable target that can put a damper on the spread of prostate cancer.
Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke.
Software locates sugarcane genes of interest
Brazilian researchers develop a program for high-performance computers to map specific portions of plant DNA faster and less expensively for use in breeding more productive and stress-resistant varieties.
Physicists create prototype superefficient memory for future computers
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands have achieved material magnetization switching on the shortest timescales, at a minimal energy cost.
The Lancet Global Health: 1 in 7 babies worldwide born with a low birthweight
More than 20 million babies were born with a low birthweight (less than 2500g; 5.5 pounds) in 2015--around one in seven of all births worldwide.
Mindfulness smoking-cessation app can change the brain
Brown University researchers have found that a mindfulness-based smartphone app designed to help people stop smoking was effective at reducing study participants' self-reported daily cigarette consumption.
Energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses
The invention uses magnets to record computer data which consume virtually zero energy, solving the dilemma of how to create faster data processing speeds without high energy costs.
New technique prepares 2D perovskite single crystals for highest photodetectivity
A research group led by Professor Liu Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr.
Researchers pinpoint why lymphoma patients may become resistant to specific therapy
Researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have discovered a mechanism of drug resistance to Venetoclax®, also known as ABT-199, a BCL-2 targeting drug commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia.
Chronic insomnia and memory problems: A direct link is established
The Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging, involving almost 30,000 adults aged 45 and over, has concluded that chronic insomnia disorder has a direct negative impact on cognitive functions, independent of other health issues.
Where there's waste there's fertilizer
Scientists recycle phosphorus by combining dairy and water treatment leftovers.
Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS
The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected.
Does fracture risk differ between 2 common types of weight-loss surgery?
This study used Medicare claims data to compare risk of fracture among about 42,000 patients who had weight-loss surgery.
'Striking' differences in rates of HIV/AIDS within African nations
Despite the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2000, HIV/AIDS is still the most common cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa, according to data from the Global Burden of Disease.
How climate change will affect the rural northeast: Expect three weeks of heat
While extreme cold and snow often make headlines in the Northeast, by 2060, there will be far more record heat.
Yale study identifies how cancer drug inhibits DNA repair in cancer cells
According to researchers at Yale Cancer Center, a cancer drug thought to be of limited use possesses a superpower of sorts: It is able to stop certain cancer cells from repairing their DNA in order to survive.
Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows
Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research.
Opioid-exposed newborns may react to pain differently after birth
Babies exposed to opioids while their mothers were pregnant with them may need special care even before they start to experience withdrawal symptoms, according to Penn State research.
Liquid biopsy could identify cancer patients at risk of metastatic disease
Analyzing fragments of DNA that are shed by tumors into the bloodstream, could indicate early on whether patients are at risk of their cancer spreading, according to new research presented today.
Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development
Scientists have discovered a curious phenomenon taking place in mouse skin: cells compete with one another for the chance to develop into mature tissue.
Enhanced anticancer compound may allow precise activation and tracking of treatment
Wistar and University of South Florida researchers have advanced a novel compound that specifically targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that is frequently hyperactivated in cancer and promotes survival of cancer cells during stressful conditions.
New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia are featured by Weed Technology
Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides.
Association between benzodiazepine use in early pregnancy, miscarriage risk
Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs used to treat anxiety, insomnia and mood disorders.
rTMS improves memory in younger and older adults
Magnetic stimulation of the brain improves working memory, offering a new potential avenue of therapy for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, according to new research from the Duke University School of Medicine.
Optimizing device implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke
According to clinical studies, about a third of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer a stroke during their lifetime.
How a new father views his relationship with his partner
A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests.
Renal infarction is associated with acute kidney injury in patients with cardiac amyloidosis
Systemic amyloidosis is a major cause of renal injury, mostly due to direct kidney damage caused by deposits of abnormal protein called amyloid, in the kidney parenchyma.
Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA
The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch.
Tracking symptoms: New Regenstrief and IU tool helps providers identify underlying causes
An easy to use, brief, inexpensive new tool that tracks symptoms such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, memory problems, anxiety and depression in older adults, developed and validated by researchers at the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University, will help healthcare providers potentially identify early onset of more complex, serious underlying issues that could otherwise go undetected.
Young adults distressed by labels of narcissism, entitlement
Young adults both believe and react negatively to messages that members of their age group are more entitled and narcissistic than other living generations, suggests new research presented by Joshua Grubbs of Bowling Green State University, Ohio, and colleagues in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019.
Same computer password for the last 10 years? You might need a vibrating cybernudge
Technology used in exercise and lifestyle apps may hold the key to answering that most difficult of challenges -- getting people to change their passwords and better protect their online privacy and data.
New strategy of reprogramming regulatory T cells may improve cancer therapies
Therapies that harness the power of the immune system against cancer have made remarkable progress against certain tumors but still remain ineffective in most cancer patients.
Mapping microbial symbioses in forests
Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria.
Helping robots remember: Hyperdimensional computing theory could change the way AI works
A paper by University of Maryland researchers just published in the journal Science Robotics introduces a new way of combining perception and motor commands using the so-called hyperdimensional computing theory, which could fundamentally alter and improve the basic artificial intelligence (AI) task of sensorimotor representation -- how agents like robots translate what they sense into what they do.
New research finds unprecedented weakening of Asian summer monsoon
Rainfall from the Asian summer monsoon has been decreasing over the past 80 years, a decline unprecedented in the last 448 years, according to a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters.
What's causing your vertigo? Goggles may help with diagnosis
Vertigo is a form of severe dizziness that can result in a loss of balance, a feeling of falling, trouble walking or standing, or nausea.
On the way to fighting staph infections with the body's immune system
Researchers have gained a greater understanding of the biology of staphylococcus skin infections in mice and how the mouse immune system mobilizes to fight them.
Toy transformers and real-life whales inspire biohybrid robot
Researchers create a remote-controlled soft robot that can transform itself to conduct targeted drug delivery against cancer cells.
Feeling healthy: A good start, but not always a good indicator of heart disease risk
Most people feel they have a general idea of how healthy they are based on their diet and exercise regimen and how often they get sick.
Embryogenesis reveals the role of the 'second brain' in digestion
Two muscles in the gut move along and mix together ingested food, and in between them is an autonomous network of neurons.
Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation
Researchers at The University of Tokyo developed a microelectromechanical device that detects terahertz radiation at room temperature.
Researchers identify new therapeutic target for metastatic prostate cancer
Researchers in New York have found that treating human prostate cancer cells with a drug that targets a protein called PHLPP2 may prevent the cancer cells from spreading to other organs in the body.
New surface treatment could improve refrigeration efficiency
Unlike water, liquid refrigerants and other fluids that have a low surface tension tend to spread quickly into a sheet when they come into contact with a surface.
Researchers block protein that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease
In recent years, it has become increasingly clear to researchers that the protein galectin-3 is involved in inflammatory diseases in the brain.
3D images reveal how infants' heads change shape during birth
Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3D images that show how infants' brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery.
Research links civic engagement to resilience
Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks.
Over-fed bacteria make people sick
In a new hypothesis, a CRC 1182 research team suggests that inflammatory diseases are caused by an over-supply of food, and the associated disturbance of the intestine's natural bacterial colonisation.
University of Idaho study finds scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth
Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model produced by University of Idaho researchers.
Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations
With growing evidence of gender bias on student course evaluations, a new intervention developed by Iowa State University researchers may help reduce bias against women instructors.
Cancer Research UK: Less chemotherapy better for older patients with some advanced cancers
Less chemotherapy is as effective at controlling disease for elderly or frail patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or oesophagus (food pipe), and leads to fewer side effects such as diarrhoea and lethargy.
Clean and effective electronic waste recycling
E-waste recycling is far below what it should be to reduce its impact on the environment and human health simply because it is not economically feasible.
A new way of diagnosing and treating disease -- without cutting skin
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery -- all without cutting skin.
Climate change, maternal care & parasitic infection all connected in SA fur seals
South American fur seal pups with high levels of hookworm infection spend more time in the water, but that's not necessarily a good thing, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia.
Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's
As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies.
End-of-career transitions for older surgeons
A special communication article focuses on end-of-career transitions for older surgeons.
Legal marijuana reduces chronic pain, but increases injuries and car accidents
The legalization of recreational marijuana is associated with an increase in its abuse, injury due to overdoses, and car accidents, but does not significantly change health care use overall, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials
Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.
First smartphone app that can hear ear infections in children
Researchers at the University of Washington have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper and a smartphone's microphone and speaker.
Some LGBT employees feel less supported at federal agencies
Workplace inequality is visible when it involves gender and race, but less so with sexual identity and gender expression.
User-friendly smartphone platform sounds out possible ear infections in children
Scientists have created a user-friendly smartphone-based platform that can quickly detect the presence of fluid in the middle ear -- a likely indicator of ear infections -- in children.
Quantum cloud computing with self-check
With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics.
Magic numbers make nickel nucleus stronger
Researchers provide the first direct evidence for a rare kind of atomic nucleus.
A recent study confirms the new trend in feminist reggaeton music
Reggaeton has traditionally been considered as a sexist music genre and the lyrics and choreographies usually associated with it are seen as a way of promoting the objectification of women.
Older adults expect to lose brainpower, but most don't ask doctors how to prevent dementia
Many Americans in their 50s and early 60s are worried about declining brain health, especially if they have loved ones with memory loss and dementia, a new national poll finds.
Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films
A team of researchers from Osaka University, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka City University, and The University of Shiga Prefecture have found excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing at room temperature in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films.
Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear
Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street.
Protection by the malaria vaccine: not only a matter of quantity but also of quality
The quantity and quality of antibodies recognizing the end region of the malaria parasite's CSP protein is a good marker of protection by the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine, shows a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results provide valuable information for guiding the design of future, more effective vaccines.
When biodegradable plastic isn't
The ubiquitous plastic bag is handy for transporting groceries and other items home from the store.
Ancient fish ponds in the Bolivian savanna supported human settlement
A network of fish ponds supported a permanent human settlement in the seasonal drylands of Bolivia more than one thousand years ago, according to a new study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriela Prestes-Carneiro of Federal University of Western Para, Brazil, and colleagues.
Iceland volcano eruption in 1783-84 did not spawn extreme heat wave
An enormous volcanic eruption on Iceland in 1783-84 did not cause an extreme summer heat wave in Europe.
Genomic collision may explain why many kidney transplants fail
Up to 1 in 7 kidney donors and recipients may have a type of genetic incompatibility that leads to organ rejection, researchers at Columbia University have found.
Robot therapists need rules
Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives.
As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too
A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult.
Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago
Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic.
Transfer of EU powers leads to silent erosion of UK pesticide regulation
New analysis by the UK Trade Policy Observatory is warning of a significant weakening of enforcement arrangements covering the approval of pesticides as part of legislative changes carried out under the EU Withdrawal Act.
Blood flow command center discovered in the brain
An international team of researchers has discovered a group of cells in the brain that may function as a 'master-controller' for the cardiovascular system, orchestrating the control of blood flow to different parts of the body.
Faster walkers more likely to live longer
People who report that they have a slower walking pace have a lower life expectancy than fast walkers, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre -- a partnership between Leicester's Hospitals, the University of Leicester and Loughborough University.
How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on
Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation.
Artificial intelligence tool vastly scales up Alzheimer's research
Researchers at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have found a way to teach a computer to precisely detect one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in human brain tissue, delivering a proof of concept for a machine-learning approach to distinguishing critical markers of the disease.
'Smart' molecules that selectively target abnormal cell growth in blood vessels may reduce reoccurring blockage after stenting
Artificial 'smart' molecules that selectively target certain blood-vessel cells and prevent abnormal growth, appear to reduce reoccurring blockages in blood vessels previously opened by stents, while sparing healthy endothelial cells lining the blood vessel.
Hearing device separates simultaneous voices, amplifies the 'target' speaker
Picking out one voice from many at a crowded party is a challenge for assistive hearing devices.
Amount of carbon stored in forests reduced as climate warms
Accelerated tree growth caused by a warming climate does not necessarily translate into enhanced carbon storage, an international study suggests.
Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Australia's Cape York Peninsula
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Queensland's Cape York Peninsula.
From Earth's deep mantle, scientists find a new way volcanoes form
Far below Bermuda's pink sand beaches and turquoise tides, geoscientists have discovered the first direct evidence that material from deep within Earth's mantle transition zone -- a layer rich in water, crystals and melted rock -- can percolate to the surface to form volcanoes.
New drug could help treat neonatal seizures
A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns.
Blood test can measure effectiveness of treatments for aggressive skin cancers
Blood tests that track the amount of tumor DNA can -- after only one month of drug therapy -- detect how well treatment is working in patients with skin cancer, a new study finds.
Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms
The results of the study, released in Neuroscience journal, show that significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function can persist for months, or even years, following concussion.
Captive chimpanzees spontaneously use tools to excavate underground food
Chimpanzees in captivity can successfully work out how to use tools to excavate underground food, even if they've never been presented with an underground food scenario before, according to a study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alba Motes-Rodrigo and colleagues and directed by Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar from the University of Oslo.
How loud is too loud when it comes to sports whistles?
Referees and others using whistles on the job need a simple way to determine whether it's harmful to their hearing, so researchers set out to put it to the test and to provide some clarity and damage risk criteria for impulse noise exposures.
New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines
Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats.
Do you trust politicians? Depends on how you define trust
For decades, political scientists have measured the public's trust in the federal government consistently, using measures that are largely unchanged since the 1960s -- despite the momentous changes happening over the last five decades in the United States.
Can sound protect eagles from wind turbine collisions?
Every year, bald and golden eagles are killed when they inadvertently fly into wind turbine blades.
Concerns as MPs' links to organization backed by tobacco industry revealed
No fewer than 25 serving Conservative MPs, including several leadership candidates, are connected to an organization part-funded by the tobacco industry and responsible for a series of attacks on public health initiatives, reveals an investigation by The BMJ.
Obesity medicine association announces major updates to its adult obesity algorithm
The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) announced the immediate availability of the 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm, with new information for clinicians including the relationship between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemia, and Cancer; information on investigational Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy; treatments for Lipodystrophy; and Pharmacokinetics and Obesity.
New study analyzes tweets to reveal how ISIS still inspires low-level attacks
By analyzing 26.2 million Twitter comments in the Arabic language, researchers found that despite losing territory, ISIS remains successful at inspiring low-level attacks because of its messaging for a 'call for lone jihad.' The study, 'ISIS at its apogee: The Arabic discourse about support for ISIS on Twitter and what we can learn from that,' was recently published in SAGE Open.

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