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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 19, 2019


New risk scores help physicians provide better care for high-risk pulmonary patients, study finds
Study of more than 17,000 patients finds new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with a severe pulmonary disorder that has no cure can help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for patients at the end of life.
Driverless cars working together can speed up traffic by 35%
A fleet of driverless cars working together to keep traffic moving smoothly can improve overall traffic flow by at least 35%, researchers have shown.
Sedation and controlled paralysis do not improve survival of ICU patients with ARDS
Reversibly paralyzing and heavily sedating hospitalized patients with severe breathing problems do not improve outcomes in most cases, according to a clinical trial conducted at dozens of North American hospitals.
Big data reveals hidden subtypes of sepsis
Much like cancer, sepsis isn't simply one condition, but rather many conditions with varying clinical characteristics that could benefit from different treatments, according to the results of a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study involving more than 100,000 patients.
Diabetes patients at higher risk of deadly liver disease, finds study of 18 million people
Many patients with potentially deadly liver cirrhosis and liver cancer are being diagnosed at late advanced stages of disease, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow.
Tumor-suppressing protein may be novel target in PAH therapy
In addition to suppressing tumors, the protein tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) may play a role in preventing or treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).
Children who walk to school less likely to be overweight or obese, study suggests
Children who regularly walk or cycle to school are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who travel by car or public transport, a new study suggests.
Environmental toxins can impair sexual development and fertility of future generations
Exposure to environmental pollutants can cause alterations in brain development that affect sexual development and fertility for several generations, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019.
Many with mild asthma, low sputum eosinophils respond equally well to steroids as placebo
A study of nearly 300 patients with mild persistent asthma found that inhaled steroids -- long considered the gold standard for asthma treatment -- were no more effective than placebo in nearly three-fourths of the study patients, all over age 12.
Bacterial pneumonia predicts ongoing lung problems in infants with acute respiratory FAI
Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure.
Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?
An aggressive new strain of sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, has turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to timber production.
Walking and strength training may decrease the risk of dying from liver disease
Physical activity, including walking and muscle-strengthening activities, were associated with significantly reduced risk of cirrhosis-related death, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019.
Researchers document impact of coffee on bowels
Coffee drinkers know that coffee helps keep the bowels moving, but researchers in Texas are trying to find out exactly why this is true, and it doesn't seem to be about the caffeine, according to a study presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019.
Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed
Prof. FENG Yingang and his colleagues from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed the structural and functional mechanism of the SigI/RsgI factors from C. thermocellum.
Growth in life expectancy in Australia slows, research finds
After 20 years of rapid increases in life expectancy at birth, the rate of growth in Australia is now falling behind most other high-income nations, meaning better control of health risk factors such as obesity will be needed if further life expectancy increases are to be achieved, research shows.
SCAI and ACVP release consensus statement on cardiovascular catheterization laboratory economics
A newly released expert consensus statement provides recommendations for optimizing the financial operations of the cardiovascular catheterization laboratory (CCL) while providing cutting-edge patient care.
Hard carbon nanofiber aerogel becomes superelastic
a research team led by Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China developed a simple and general method to fabricate superelastic and fatigue resistant hard carbon aerogels with nanofibrous network structure by using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin as a hard carbon source.
Sleep problems in teenagers reversed in just one week by limiting screen use
Sleep in teenagers can be improved by just one week of limiting their evening exposure to light-emitting screens on phones, tablets and computers, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019.
Scientists at DGIST develop polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature
DGIST announced on May 8 that a polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature was developed by Professor Chang-Hee Cho's team in the Department of Emerging Materials Science, in collaboration with Professor Seong-Ju Park at GIST and Professor Ritesh Agarwal at University of Pennsylvania.

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