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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 20, 2019


Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped.
Long-term use of benralizumab appears safe, effective for severe asthma
Patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, who participated in three different Phase 3 trials of benralizumab (brand name Fasenra) and then enrolled in a long-term trial of the drug's efficacy and safety, continued to experience fewer exacerbations and improved pulmonary function and quality of life.
Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time
In a recent study published in BBA -- General Subjects, Kanazawa university researchers have used high-speed microscopy to investigate native structure and conformational dynamics of hemagglutinin in influenza A.
The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery
A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder.
Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests
Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress.
Professor Anu Masso: e-residency contributes to the reproduction of digital inequalities
In a situation of rapid digitalisation of public and private sector services the methods for digital identity verification and authentication are also becoming increasingly important for citizens.
Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors
Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs.
Pyrrolizidine alkaloid levels in dried and deep-frozen spices and herbs too high
Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) are natural constituents detected all over the world in more than 350 plant species and suspected to occur in more than 6,000.
Progress to restore movement in people with neuromotor disabilities
A study published in the advanced edition of April 12, 2019 in the journal Neural Computation shows that approaches based on Long Short-Term Memory decoders could provide better algorithms for neuroprostheses that employ Brain-Machine Interfaces to restore movement in patients with severe neuromotor disabilities.
Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests
The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests.
Just released: Proceedings from inaugural Medical Summit on Firearm Injury Prevention
Proceedings from the first-ever Medical Summit on Firearm Injury Prevention have been released and published on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website as an 'article in press' in advance of print publication.
Echolocation: Making the best of sparse information
New findings reported by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers challenge a generally accepted model of echolocation in bats.
Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire
The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Monica Turner and her team describe what happens when Yellowstone -- adapted to recurring fires every 100 to 300 years -- instead burns twice in fewer than 30 years.
Pseudohermaphrodite snails can help to access how polluted the Arctic seas are
Ivan Nekhaev, a postdoc at St Petersburg University, studied snails of the genus Boreocingula -- tiny gastropods as small as half a centimeter -- and first discovered that Arctic micromolluscs can show signs of pseudohermaphroditism.
Baylor Scott & White gastroenterology researchers share key takeaways from DDW 2019
Dr. Stuart J. Spechler among researchers from Baylor Scott & White Research Institute available to provide key takeaways from Digestive Disease Week 2019.
Key acid-activated protein channel identified
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart attack, cancer and inflammation.
The return of the wolves
Researchers examine global strategies for dealing with predators.
Crime fighting just got easier as burglars reveal all
First study of burglars committing crime in virtual reality could change the way we protect our homes from burglars.
Economists find net benefit in soda tax
A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a 'net good,' an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior.
Noninvasive electrophysiological biomarker for Parkinson's disease
Novel measures of brain activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be detected with scalp electrodes, according to a new analysis published in eNeuro.
Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction, study finds
Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Why are gels elastic?
They're in a range of consumer products -- everything from toothpaste and yogurt to fabric softeners and insoles for shoes.
Cardiac MRI may lead to targeted PAH therapy
Patients at greatest risk of dying from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be identified through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the information the noninvasive scan provides about the functional level of the heart's right ventricle.
Cutting the time on early disease diagnoses with extracellular vesicles
A research team led by the University of Notre Dame is working to cut the test time for disease biomarkers.
Nearly 1 in 5 parents say their child never wears a helmet while riding a bike
Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds.
'Spidey senses' could help autonomous machines see better
Purdue University researchers are building 'spidey senses' into the shells of autonomous cars and drones so that they could detect and avoid objects better.
Study identifies enzymes that prevent diabetic kidney disease
A new study from Joslin Diabetes Center has proven that certain biological protective factors play a large role in preventing diabetic kidney disease in certain people.
June's SLAS technology special collection now available
The June issue of SLAS Technology features the article, 'Next Generation Compound Delivery to Support Miniaturized Biology,' which focuses on the challenges of changing the established screening paradigm to support the needs of modern drug discovery.
Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time
Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm.
Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence
Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption.
Fiber-based imaging spectrometer captures record amounts of data
Researchers have developed a new compact, fiber-based imaging spectrometer for remote sensing that can capture 30,000 sampling points each containing more than 60 wavelengths.
How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy
Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment.
SLAS Discovery announces its June cover article
The June cover of SLAS Discovery features cover article 'A Perspective on Extreme Open Science: Companies Sharing Compounds without Restriction,' by Timothy M.
Potential new therapy takes aim at a lethal esophageal cancer's glutamine addiction
Medical University of South Carolina investigators have exploited a metabolic quirk of certain cancers known as glutamine addiction to identify a potential new therapy for esophageal cancer.
Australian drivers ready to embrace phone restriction apps -- if they can still talk
Almost 70 per cent of drivers would be willing to install smartphone apps that block texting and browsing according to new Australian research from Queensland University of Technology -- but only if they can still do hands-free calls and listen to Bluetooth music.
Overweight adolescents are as likely to develop heart disorders as obese adolescents
Brazilian researchers arrived at this conclusion after conducting cardiovascular fitness tests with boys and girls aged 10-17.
Scientists succeed in testing potential brain-based method to diagnose autism
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have taken the first step in developing an objective, brain-based test to diagnose autism.
Pinterest homemade sunscreens: A recipe for sunburn
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Brooks College of Health at University of North Florida examined how homemade sunscreens were portrayed on Pinterest.
New investigational therapy shows promise for asthma patients in Phase 2 trial
In a Phase 2 trial, RTB101, which belongs to a class of drugs known as TORC1 inhibitors, was observed to be well tolerated and to reduce the incidence of respiratory tract infections in adults age 65 and older when given once daily for 16 weeks during winter cold and flu season.
New recommendations for stroke systems of care to improve patient outcomes
To translate advances in scientific knowledge and innovations in stroke care into improvements in patient outcomes, comprehensive stroke systems of care must be in place to facilitate optimal stroke care delivery.
SCAI releases multi-society endorsed consensus on the classification stages of cardiogenic shock
A newly released expert consensus statement proposes a classification schema for cardiogenic shock that will facilitate communication in both the clinical and research settings.
A better understanding of the von Willebrand Factor's A2 domain
A team of Lehigh University researchers is working to characterize the mysterious protein known as the Von Willebrand Factor (vWF).
Teens with ADHD get more traffic violations for risky driving, have higher crash risk
Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD.
Novel technique reduces obstruction risk in heart valve replacement
Researchers at the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a novel technique that prevents the obstruction of blood flow, a common fatal complication of transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR).
Professor rethinks living spaces for refugee camps
New technologies have made the world smaller. Rana Abudayyeh, a professor of interior architecture, asks how architects respond to shifting perspectives of space for displaced people.
Progress in family planning in Africa accelerating
A new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that women in eight sub-Saharan African countries are gaining access to and using modern contraception at a faster rate than previously projected.
Neurobiology: Doubly secured
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain.
Free-standing emergency departments in Texas' big cities are not reducing congestion at hospitals
Free-standing emergency departments (EDs) in Texas' largest cities have not alleviated emergency room congestion or improved patient wait times in nearby hospitals, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University.
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures?
Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto
Computer simulations provide compelling evidence that an insulating layer of gas hydrates could keep a subsurface ocean from freezing beneath Pluto's icy exterior, according to a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience.
New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer
For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument.
MedStar Franklin Square to offer new treatment option for qualified emphysema patients
MedStar Franklin Square is the first medical facility in the state to offer endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR), using a new FDA-approved lung valve that is positioned in damaged lung airways without surgery, and allows patients with severe emphysema to breathe easier.
Computer program designed to calculate the economic impact of forest fires
Visual Seveif software measures the economic impact of a fire, taking into account both material resources and their utility for leisure and recreation, the landscape's value and, now, carbon fixation.
Mount Sinai discovers placental stem cells that can regenerate heart after heart attack
Study identifies new stem cell type that can significantly improve cardiac function.
Behold the Bili-ruler: A novel, low-cost device for screening neonatal hyperbilirubinemia
A team from Brigham and Women's Hospital recently reported the creation and validation of a novel tool, the Bili-ruler, designed for use by frontline health workers to screen for hyperbilirubinemia in low-resource settings.
More detailed picture of Earth's mantle
The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed.
Air pollution affects tree growth in São Paulo
Researchers in Brazil find that high levels of heavy metals and particulate matter suspended in the atmosphere restrict the growth of tipuana trees, which are ubiquitous in São Paulo, the largest Brazilian city.
Younger miners more likely to die from black lung disease than older generations
Black lung disease and other non-malignant respiratory diseases appear to account for a greater proportion of deaths in younger generations of coal miners.
Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique
Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing.
People in higher social class have an exaggerated belief that they are better than others
People who see themselves as being in a higher social class may tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Enzyme may represent new target for treating asthma
An enzyme called diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) appears to play an important role in suppressing runaway inflammation in asthma and may represent a novel therapeutic target.
Giving rural Indians what they want increases demand for cookstoves
Adopting common business practices, such as robust supply chains, market analysis and rebates, can increase the adoption of improved cookstoves by as much as 50% in rural India, according to a new study led by Duke University researchers.
Counter-intuitive climate change solution
A seemingly counterintuitive approach -- converting one greenhouse gas into another -- holds promise for returning the atmosphere to pre-industrial concentrations of methane, a powerful driver of global warming.
People with benign skin condition willing to trade time, money to cure disorder
People with benign hyperpigmentation (the darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin), are willing to pay (WTP) nearly 14 percent of their monthly income and approximately 90 minutes a day to cure their condition.
Hyperspectral camera captures wealth of data in an instant
Rice University scientists and engineers develop a portable spectrometer able to capture far more data much quicker than other fiber-based systems.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy prevalence increases, while incidence remains steady
In the first study of its kind involving Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in the US, researchers from the Deerfield Institute found that while the number of new cases has remained stable, there has been an uptick in prevalence -- largely attributed to enhanced treatments and longevity.
Sexual minority cancer survivors face disparities in access to care and quality of life
Results from a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, point to the need for improved access to medical care for sexual minority cancer survivors, in particular female survivors.
Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
Infant deaths highlight danger of misusing car seats, other sitting devices
Car safety seats are vital to protect children while traveling, but a new infant death study underlines the need to follow the seats' instructions and to use them only for their intended purpose.
Weight gain and loss may worsen dementia risk in older people
Older people who experience significant weight gain or weight loss could be raising their risk of developing dementia, suggests a study from Korea published today in the online journal BMJ Open.
Synthesis of helical ladder polymers
Researchers at Kanazawa University synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry, as they reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
Bolstering biopsies: Testing individual cells to guide treatment
In research that could make biopsies more useful for many diseases, scientists have used a powerful new tool to zero in on individual cells in a patient's diseased organ and reveal the cells' underlying glitches in gene expression -- information that may allow for more precise and effective treatment.
Key drug target shown assembling in real-time
Over one-third of all FDA-approved drugs act on a specific family of proteins: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs).
Statin use associated with reduced risk of dementia after concussion in older adults
Concussion is a common brain injury. This observational study of nearly 29,000 adults (66 and older) diagnosed with concussion examined whether statin use was associated with risk of long-term dementia after a concussion.
Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists
Artificial intelligence was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment.
Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives
Producing cement takes a big toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process.
Why do women military vets avoid using VA benefits?
Many women military veterans turn to the Veterans Administration (VA) for health care and social services only as a 'last resort' or 'safety net,' typically for an emergency or catastrophic health event, or when private health insurance is unaffordable.
Bacteria change behavior to tackle tiny obstacle course
It's not exactly the set of TV's 'American Ninja Warrior,' but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food.
Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia
Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, suffer from an additional disease called cachexia.
Artificial intelligence becomes life-long learner with new framework
A project of the US Army has developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence systems to better learn new tasks while forgetting less of what they have learned regarding previous tasks.
High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize
Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize.
Rocky mountain spotted fever risks examined
In Mexicali, Mexico, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, one of the deadliest tickborne diseases in the Americas, has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008.
New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development
A a new method of assessing the actions of medicines by matching them to their unique protein receptors has the potential to greatly accelerate drug development and diminish the number of drug trials that fail during clinical trials.
New single vaccination approach to killer diseases
Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases.
Studies: Benralizumab not effective reducing exacerbations in moderate to very severe COPD
New research published online May 20, 2019 by the New England Journal of Medicine and co-led by Temple's Gerard J.
New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients
Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?
How Earth's mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting
To geologists, the mantle is so much more than that.
Strawberry tree honey inhibits cell proliferation in colon cancer lines
Spanish and Italian researchers have proven that when honey from strawberry trees, a product typical of Mediterranean areas, is added to colon cancer cells grown in the laboratory, cell proliferation is stopped.
Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide
A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end.
Epidemiology: Measures for cleaner air
Worldwide, a broad range of measures have been introduced to reduce outdoor air pollution.
SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost
A collaborative research team from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has now developed 'Signal Amplification by Exchange Reaction' (SABER), a highly programmable and practical method that significantly enhances the sensitivity as well as customization and multiplexing capabilities of FISH analysis.
Ultra-thin superlattices from gold nanoparticles for nanophotonics
The group of Prof. Dr. Matthias Karg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry at Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) in Germany is creating ultra-thin, highly ordered layers of spherical hydrogel beads that encapsulate gold or silver particles.
Zebrafish help researchers explore alternatives to bone marrow donation
UC San Diego researchers discover new role for epidermal growth factor receptor in blood stem cell development, a crucial key to being able to generate them in the laboratory, and circumvent the need for bone marrow donation.
Lupus treatments can be tailored to patient's individual cells, study shows
A new report shows how tissue samples from some lupus patients can accurately predict those more likely than not to respond to therapy.
Noninvasive biomarker for Parkinson's disease possibly found in EEG data
Specific angles and sharpness of brain waves seen in unfiltered raw data from scalp electroencephalograms have been tied to Parkinson's disease.
Circadian mechanism may not be driver behind compound linked to obesity and diabetes
SR9009 is a compound that can lead to a wide range of health benefits in animals, including reduced risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.
Worst form of black lung disease is on the rise but the cause remains unknown
Progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), the worst form of black lung disease, is rising among coal miners, but the reasons for this trend remain unclear, according to research presented at ATS 2019.
Superconductor's magnetic persona unmasked
In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star.
New flying/driving robot developed at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Possible commercial uses are package deliveries since it can quickly fly to a target zone and then drive using its wheels safely and quietly to reach the recipient's doorstep.
New Finnish study: Dietary cholesterol or egg consumption do not increase the risk of stroke
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a moderately high intake of dietary cholesterol or consumption of up to one egg per day is not associated with an elevated risk of stroke.
Anxiety might be alleviated by regulating gut bacteria
People who experience anxiety symptoms might be helped by taking steps to regulate the microorganisms in their gut using probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements, suggests a review of studies published today in the journal General Psychiatry.
Eliminating extended work shifts improves sleep duration for senior resident physicians
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital comparing the work hours and sleep obtained by pediatric resident physicians working extended shifts with those whose scheduled shift lengths were limited to no more than 16 consecutive hours found that hours of sleep per week increased under a modified schedule.
Estonian scientists took a big step forward in studying a widespread gynecological disease
Endometriosis is a women's disease that affects 10-15% of all reproductive-aged women.
Giant impact caused difference between Moon's hemispheres
The stark difference between the Moon's heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.
Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems.
Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability
Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study on the alpine marmot.
Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior
Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviors of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute.
Preparing low-income communities for hurricanes begins with outreach, Rutgers study finds
Governments seeking to help their most vulnerable residents prepare for hurricanes and other disasters should create community-based information campaigns ahead of time, according to a Rutgers study of economically disadvantaged New Jerseyans in the areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.
Researchers link new protein to Parkinson's
Cells depend on a protein called Parkin, which is mutated in some forms of Parkinson's disease, to get rid of damaged mitochondria.
Dog-like robot made by students jumps, flips and trots
Stanford students developed a dog-like robot that can navigate tough terrain -- and they want you to make one too.
Young children willing to punish misbehavior, even at personal cost, new research shows
Children as young as three years old are willing to punish others' bad behavior, even at personal cost, finds a new study by psychology researchers.
Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate
Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers.
Bonobo mothers help their sons to have more offspring
In many social animal species individuals share child-rearing duties, but new research from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, finds that bonobo mothers go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers.
Discovery in mice could remove roadblock to more insulin production
A new discovery made mainly in mice could provide new options for getting the insulin-making 'factories' of the pancreas going again when diabetes and obesity have slowed them down.
New cognitive training game to improve driving skills among the elderly
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new cognitive training game aimed at improving road safety among elderly drivers.
Seasonal clock changing helps to synchronize human sleep/wake cycle across latitude
In winter, the sleep/wake cycle is dominated by sunrise. Wake-up times tend to occur during the winter twilight regulated by the circadian photorecpetive mechanism.
Thinking outside the box: 'Seeing' clearer and deeper into live organs
Scientists using a unique approach have developed a new biomedical imaging contrast agent.
Chinese-Americans abused earlier in life face greater abuse risk as elders
Chinese-Americans who were victims of child abuse or intimate partner violence are at a greater risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a Rutgers study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.