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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 21, 2019


Predictors of refugee adjustment: The importance of cognitive skills and personality
An increased willingness to take risks, reciprocating friendliness, and a conviction that they are in control of their own lives lead to refugees gaining a foothold in Germany faster.
Food insecurity in Nunavut increased after Nutrition North Canada introduced
Food insecurity, meaning inadequate or insecure access to food because of a lack of money, has worsened in Nunavut communities since the introduction of the federal government's Nutrition North Canada program in 2011, found research published in CMAJ.
Soy foods linked to fewer fractures in younger breast cancer survivors
A new paper in JNCI Cancer Spectrum, published by Oxford University Press, is the first study to find that diets high in soy foods are associated with a decreased risk of osteoporotic bone fractures in pre-menopausal breast cancer survivors.
Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish
A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon -- and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake.
Bad marketing encourages consumers to opt for lower quality products
A new framework to enable retailers to better position their products to consumers has been devised by Tamer Boyaci and Frank Huettner at ESMT Berlin together with Yalcin Akcay from Melbourne Business School.
Study identifies our 'inner pickpocket'
Researchers have identified how the human brain is able to determine the properties of a particular object using purely statistical information: a result which suggests there is an 'inner pickpocket' in all of us.
Algorithm steers catheters to the right spot to treat atrial fibrillation
Some patients with atrial fibrillation or A-Fib need an ablation, which requires a catheter and an advanced 3D map of the heart.
McMaster researchers create a better way to transport life-saving vaccines
Researchers at McMaster University have invented a stable, affordable way to store fragile vaccines for weeks at a time at temperatures up to 40C, opening the way for life-saving anti-viral vaccines to reach remote and impoverished regions of the world.
Multiple brain regions moderate and link depressive mood and pain
University of California San Diego School of Medicine research expands and deepens the association between clinical depression and pain, identifying specific regions of the brain that drive, influence and moderate depressive mood and its relationship to perceiving physical pain.
Improved air quality in Los Angeles region leads to fewer new asthma cases in kids
Improved air quality in the Los Angeles region is linked to roughly 20% fewer new asthma cases in children, according to a landmark USC study that tracked Southern California children over a 20-year period.
Developing biosecurity tool to detect genetically engineered organisms in the wild
If a genetically or synthetically engineered organism gets into the environment, how will we tell it apart from the millions of naturally occurring microorganisms?
The insulin under the influence of light
By understanding how the brain links the effects of insulin to light, researchers (UNIGE) are deciphering how insulin sensitivity fluctuates according to circadian cycles.
Want to eliminate workplace bias? Watch your rating system, study says
A new study looking at student ratings of university teaching performance shows that a substantial gender gap under a 10-point system disappears when the system used only has six points.
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests.
Global agreement reached on standards for clinical trials in children with MS
The International Pediatric MS Study Group -- a group of care providers and researchers looking to optimize worldwide care, education and research in pediatric multiple sclerosis -- was convened with sponsorship by the National MS Society and the MS Society of Canada.
Head injury effects halted by xenon gas, finds first ever life-long study in mice
Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), xenon prevented early death, improved long-term cognition, and protected brain tissue in mice in a new study.
Bring on faster internet: Device packs more into optical fiber
A research team has developed a light beam device that could lead to faster internet, clearer images of space and more detailed medical imaging.
Early life exposure to nicotine alters neurons, predisposes brain to addiction later
Neonatal exposure to nicotine alters the reward circuity in the brains of newborn mice, increasing their preference for the drug in later adulthood, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine in a published study.
Optical illusions reveal regular waves of brain activity enable visual feature integration
Rhythmic waves of brain activity cause us to see or not see complex images that flash before our eyes.
Stem cell differences could explain why women are more likely to develop adrenal cancer
Scientists have discovered a potential biological reason why women are more likely to develop adrenal disorders, including cancer.
Women and older people are most likely to be exposed to shortcomings in heart failure care
The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford investigated the medical care received by heart failure patients from the time of diagnosis up to a year later, examining variations over time based on patient characteristics such as age, sex, and socioeconomic status, as well as across outpatient and inpatient settings.
Patients who lose significant weight before a transplant are at higher risk of dying
Unexpected weight loss can be the sign of a serious health problem, especially in kidney transplant patients whose body systems are already under duress.
Contact with nature during childhood could lead to better mental health in adulthood
Almost 3,600 people participated in a European study on the impact of green and blue spaces on mental health and vitality.
CBD reduces craving and anxiety in people with heroin use disorder
Mount Sinai study highlights the potential of cannabidiol as a treatment option for opioid abuse.
Dead cells disrupt how immune cells respond to wounds and patrol for infection
Immune cells prioritise the clearance of dead cells overriding their normal migration to sites of injury.
How molecular escorts help prevent cancer
The anti-tumor protein p53 can decide on the life or death of a cell: If it detects damage in the cell's genome, the protein pushes the cell to suicide.
Ammonium fertilized early life on earth
A Syracuse University professor has demonstrated that ammonium -- an odiferous chemical compound, often used in fertilizer -- was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth.
Widespread testing, treatment of Hepatitis C in US prisons improves outcomes
At current drug prices, testing all persons entering prison for Hepatitis C, treating those who have at least 12 months remaining in their sentence, and linking individuals with less than 12 months in their sentence to care upon their release would result in improved health outcomes.
First report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in Florida could spell trouble for papaya
In the fall of 2017, leaves of phasey bean plants in Homestead, Florida, displayed powdery fungal growth, which appeared in the form of white spots on both sides of the leaves.
With a hop, a skip and a jump, high-flying robot leaps through obstacles with ease
First unveiled in 2016, Salto the jumping robot stands at little less than a foot, but can vault over three times its height in a single bound.
Tropical Pacific variability key for successful climate forecasts
The warming of the Earth by the human-caused greenhouse effect is progressing.
Expert consensus published on use of imaging to guide heart attack treatment
Imaging provides a more precise diagnosis of a heart attack that can be used to individualise treatment.
Scientists discover potential breakthrough in the understanding of tumor dormancy
Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center may have uncovered a primary method through which cancer cells exist undetected in an organism and received more than $1 million to investigate the potential for novel therapeutics that target and destroy cells in a specific state of tumor dormancy.
CBD clinical trial results on seizure frequency in dogs 'encouraging'
Dr. Stephanie McGrath found in a small study that 89 percent of dogs who received CBD in the clinical trial had a reduction in the frequency of seizures.
Formation of the moon brought water to Earth
As the only terrestrial planet, the Earth has a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis.
Innovative treatment option rapidly reduces harmful cholesterol levels after heart attack
Results from the multi-center, randomized PREMIER clinical trial show a new treatment option dramatically lowers rates of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) for heart attack patients following an interventional cardiology procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.
Scientists discovered an entirely new reason for methane venting from the Arctic Shelf
Russian scientists have discovered a previously unknown mechanism of influence of salts migration on the degradation of gigantic intra permafrost gas (methane) hydrate reserves in the Arctic Shelf.
How usable is virtual reality?
Virtual Reality takes over ever more areas of our lives so it is important that virtual worlds offer high usability.
First prospective registry confirms FFR impact treatment plans for patients with CAD
A prospective, multicenter, multinational study examines how fractional flow reserve (FFR) can impact treatment plans and outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases
A team led by Ivaylo Ivanov of Georgia State University used the 200-petaflop IBM AC922 Summit system, the world's smartest and most powerful supercomputer, to develop an integrative model of the transcription preinitiation complex (PIC), a complex of proteins vital to gene expression.
New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number
Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies.
Exercise: Psych patients' new primary prescription
A new study advocates for exercise as the primary method of treatment and intervention, rather than psychotropic medications, within inpatient psychiatric facilities.
Heart failure patients in UK do not receive the long-term care they need
Management of people with heart failure in the UK has shortcomings in screening, continuity of care, and medication doses, which disproportionally impact women and older people, according to a study led by Nathalie Conrad and Kazem Rahimi of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford, UK, published May 21 in PLOS Medicine.
New podcast explores why 'statistically significant' is so misunderstood
It's a controversial topic. Probability values (p-values) have been used as a way to measure the significance of research studies since the 1920s, with thousands of researchers relying on them since.
What's the right amount of 'zapping' in epilepsy laser surgery?
A multicenter trial of minimally invasive laser surgery to treat epileptic seizures reveals approaches for better seizure control with fewer side effects.
Studies find no yield benefit to higher plant populations
Curtis Adams and his colleagues at Texas A&M AgriLife Research reviewed plant population studies published in 2000 or later.
Global AFIB patient registry shows new tools needed to assess patient risk
Initial results from the AVIATOR 2 international registry are being presented as late-breaking clinical science at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2019 Scientific Sessions.
Johns Hopkins researchers publish digital health roadmap
In the dizzying swirl of health-related websites, social media and smartphone apps, finding a reliable source of health information can be a challenge.
Novel therapeutic approach effective at reducing pressure for heart failure patients
Results from a first-in-man proof of concept study found occlusion of the superior vena cava (SVC) rapidly and effectively reduces pressure and volume in the heart.
Female firefighters more likely to suffer PTSD, contemplate suicide
Female firefighters are fighting for their mental health as they perform their grueling duties.
Rare pulmonary side effects of brigatinib often resolve without treatment discontinuation
'This study shows that [rare pulmonary side effects of brigatinib] can disappear within days despite continued exposure to the drug,' says D.
Women are less likely to be resuscitated and survive a cardiac arrest than men
Women who have a cardiac arrest outside the hospital setting are less likely to receive resuscitation from bystanders and more likely to die than men, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal.
First in human results show early bird device effective in early detection of internal bleeding
New study results validate the effectiveness of the Saranas Early Bird Bleed Monitoring System to sense bleeding events during endovascular related procedures by using sensors to detect relative changes in tissue bioimpedance.
Road to cell death mapped in the Alzheimer's brain
Scientists have identified a new mechanism that accelerates aging in the brain and gives rise to the most devastating biological features of Alzheimer's disease.
Providing state-of-the-art guidance and clarification concerning IC imaging
Intra-coronary (IC) imaging has been available for over two decades.
Penguins and their chicks' responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation
Endangered penguins respond rapidly to changes in local fish numbers, and monitoring them could inform fisheries management and marine conservation.
Why lack of sleep is bad for your heart
People who sleep fewer than 7 hours per night have lower levels of gene-regulating molecules, or microRNAs, which help dampen down inflammation in cells and support vascular health.
Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented
A new study of UK lake sediment records stretching back over several centuries has found that the floods that hit Northern England in 2009 and 2015 ('Storm Desmond'),were the largest in 600 years, pointing to the impact of climate changes on the frequency and magnitude of these extreme events.
Bravo-3 clinical trial shows strong safety profile for Proglide suture device
Results from an analysis of a large randomized trial shows ProGlide vascular closure device (VCD) was associated with lower rates of vascular complications, lower rates of acute kidney injury (AKI) and shorter hospitalizations after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) when compared with Prostar XL.
Children with cancer wait an average of 6.5 years longer than adults to access new drugs
An analysis of 117 cancer drugs approved by the US FDA over a 20-year period finds the drugs took a median of 6.5 years to go from the first clinical trial in adults to the first trial in children.
Experts urge stronger emphasis on cancer prevention in older population
Cancer prevention efforts rarely focus on the distinct needs and circumstances of older people, who are at greatest risk for developing cancer, but society can do more to reduce cancer risk and preserve health as adults enter their 60s, 70s, and beyond -- according to a new supplement to the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America.
New lidar instruments peer skyward for clues on weather and climate
Researchers have developed a set of diode-based lidar instruments that could help fill important gaps in meteorological observations and fuel a leap in understanding, modeling and predicting weather and climate.
3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved.
Water formation on the Moon demonstrated by UH Manoa scientists
Chemistry Professor Ralf I. Kaiser and HIGP's Jeffrey Gillis-Davis designed the experiments to test the synergy between hydrogen protons from solar wind, lunar minerals, and micrometeorite impacts.
Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds
Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' -- they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires.
The Lancet Public Health: Firearm mortality highest in young men, and is associated with race and education
Firearms are a leading contributor to mortality in men aged 15-34 years in the USA, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia, according to an observational study using national data for 106.3 million deaths, including 2.5 million firearm deaths in these 4 countries, published in The Lancet Public Health journal.
In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago.
Using 3D to test personalised treatments in five days
Researchers (UNIGE) have devised a cell co-culture platform that reproduces a patient's tumour structure in 3D.
BU finds elevated chemical levels in nail technicians' blood
Last year, the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) implemented new requirements for active ventilation at nail salons.
What makes a place a home?
Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass.
Stellar waltz with dramatic ending
Astronomers at the University of Bonn and their colleagues from Moscow have identified an unusual celestial object.
Eastern forests shaped more by Native Americans' burning than climate change
Native Americans' use of fire to manage vegetation in what is now the Eastern United States was more profound than previously believed, according to a Penn State researcher who determined that forest composition change in the region was caused more by land use than climate change.
Study supports effectiveness of new fast-acting antidepressant, esketamine nasal spray
New research supports the effectiveness and safety of esketamine nasal spray in treating depression in people who have not responded to previous treatment.
Study reveals breakthrough in understanding long-term memory retrieval
UNLV researchers have discovered a novel method for how two parts of the brain -- the hippocampus and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) -- work together to retrieve long-term memories.
'Implicit measures' better assess vocabulary for those with autism than standard tests
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research.
Blood proteins help predict risk of developing heart failure
Two blood proteins help predict more accurately the risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure hospitalization.
Interventions with paclitaxel drug-coated balloons
This PCR statement on paclitaxel drug-coated balloons (DCB) use in peripheral interventions addresses the controversy raised by the meta-analysis of K.
A considerable percentage of deaths in HIV patients are due to cryptococcal infections
Cryptococcal meningitis causes about one in ten HIV-related deaths, according to a study of autopsies performed in Mozambique and Brazil and coordinated by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa'.
Testifying while black: A linguistic analysis of disparities in court transcription
A new study has found that court reporters transcribe speakers of African American English significantly below their required level of accuracy.
Space travel and your joints
A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints?
Toward zero hunger: More food or a smarter food system?
When thinking about ways to end global hunger, many scholars focus too narrowly on increasing crop yields while overlooking other critical aspects of the food system.
Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders
Results of a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT).
River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese
The Han Chinese are the world's largest ethnic group, making up 91.6% of modern-day China.
New method could shed light on workers' historical radiation exposure
Researchers in the UK have developed a new method for evaluating plutonium workers' historical internal radiation exposure in a study funded by the National Institute for Health Research.
Discrimination against older people needs attention, study says
Ever cracked a joke about old people? It might seem funny, but in a world where the population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups, ageism is no laughing matter, says a University of Alberta researcher.
Strain enables new applications of 2D materials
Superconductors' never-ending flow of electrical current could provide new options for energy storage and superefficient electrical transmission and generation.
UC studies links between air pollution and childhood anxiety
A new study from researchers at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center looks at the correlation between exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and childhood anxiety, by looking at the altered neurochemistry in pre-adolescents.
New technique promises improved metastatic prostate cancer detection
Results reported in Biomicrofluidics promise a new way to detect prostate cancer through a simple device, which forces cell samples through channels less than 10 microns wide.
BU researchers discover a new beneficial function of an ancient protein
Cell boundaries are made of lipids. When cells are severely damaged, these lipids need to be rapidly removed to avoid toxicity and facilitate tissue healing.
New framework improves performance of deep neural networks
Researchers have developed a new framework for building deep neural networks via grammar-guided network generators.
First-of-its-kind clinical trial shows improvement of outcomes in cardiogenic shock patients
A new study is the first to establish a nationwide treatment protocol that can save lives of patients with cardiogenic shock (CS), a deadly heart attack complication.
New study finds distinct microbes living next to corals
Symbiotic algae living inside corals provide those animals with their vibrant color, as well as many of the nutrients they need to survive.
Nerve fibers in skin involved in initiating neurofibromas in patients with disfiguring NF1
A study published today in PLOS ONE discovered the origin of severely disfiguring masses of cells, called neurofibromas, that gradually develop throughout the skin of patients afflicted with Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1).
How to program materials
Can the properties of composite materials be predicted? Empa scientists have mastered this feat and thus can help achieve research objectives faster.
Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering.
Study explains why some parasitic worms persist in people
A new study co-led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln may explain why some people struggle to expel parasitic worms that infect their intestines.
Re-designing hydrogenases
EPFL chemists have synthesized the first ever functional non-native metal hydrogenase.
African-Americans with COPD appear less likely to use pulmonary rehab
African-American patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are less likely to participate in pulmonary rehabilitation programs than white patients, even when there are programs nearby.
Doctors can estimate patient adherence by simply asking about medication routine
Doctors know patients do not always take their medications as prescribed.
Original kilogram replaced -- new International System of Units (SI) entered into force
In addition to Ampere, Kelvin, Mol and Co., the kilogram also is now defined by a natural constant.
Did cholesterol levels improve among us kids, adolescents?
This study examined cholesterol levels in children and adolescents in the US from 1999 to 2016.
What happens to young adults after a first heart attack?
Heart attacks among adults younger than 50 years of age are on the rise.
Solving a scientific mystery and finding a solution for industry
In solving a scientific mystery, researchers from the University of Houston and the nation's national laboratories also discovered a new avenue for clearing toxins from water, including wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing.
Dawn-to-sunset fasting suggests potential new treatment for obesity-related conditions
Fasting from dawn to sunset for 30 days increased levels of proteins that play a crucial role in improving insulin resistance and protecting against the risks from a high-fat, high-sugar diet, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2019.
Novel index accurately predicts PCI success post procedure compared to standard measurement metrics
Results from a comprehensive analysis demonstrate the effectiveness of measuring a non-hyperemic pressure ratio (NHPR), pressure distal/pressure aortic (Pd/Pa) alongside fractional flow reserve (FFR) post percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
Life in evolution's fast lane
Most living things have a suite of genes dedicated to repairing their DNA, limiting the rate at which their genomes change through time.
Mathematicians revive abandoned approach to Riemann Hypothesis
Many ways to approach the Riemann Hypothesis have been proposed during the past 150 years, but none of them have led to conquering the most famous open problem in mathematics.
Fish fences across the tropical seas having large-scale devastating effects
Huge fish fences which are commonly used in tropical seas are causing extensive social, ecological and economic damage and are threatening marine biodiversity and human livelihoods, according to a new study.
Where best to provide patient-centered HIV care: In the community or the clinic?
Delivery of antiretroviral HIV treatment via community-based clubs can reduce retention of patients in care, according to a new research study published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Colleen Hanrahan of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md., and colleagues.
New opioid speeds up recovery without increasing pain sensitivity or risk of chronic pain
A new type of non-addictive opioid developed by researchers at Tulane University and the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System accelerates recovery time from pain compared to morphine without increasing pain sensitivity, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation.
Most e-cigarette users want to quit, Rutgers study finds
Most people who smoke e-cigarettes want to quit and many have tried to reduce their use, according to Rutgers researchers.
The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon.
Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks
Several University of Georgia researchers teamed up to create a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis.
Inhibition of protein phosphorylation promotes optic nerve regeneration after injury
Research results from a recent study led by a Waseda University-led team suggest that the inhibition of phosphorylation of microtubule-binding protein CRMP2 could be a novel approach to the development of treatments for optic neuropathies, such as glaucoma and traumatic injury.
Only half of US kids and teens have ideal cholesterol levels
Cholesterol levels in US youth have improved from 1999 to 2016, but only half of children and adolescents are in the ideal range and 25% are in the clinically high range, according to a study published in JAMA, led by Amanda Marma Perak, M.D.
Subtropical storm Andrea jumps the gun as the first storm of 2019 Atlantic season
Andrea becomes the first subtropical storm for the 2019 season although we are two weeks short of the official start date of June 1, 2019.
First-of-its-kind study finds positive outcomes for chronic kidney disease patients
A new study exams the effects of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation on patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).
Young athletes who require ACL reconstruction may benefit from additional procedure
An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, an injury of the knee, can be devastating to a young athlete.
After GWAS studies, how to narrow the search for genes?
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often turn up a long list of genes that MIGHT help cause the trait of interest.
UTSA political scientist analyzes the UN's Twitter feed to improve diplomatic relations
Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter.

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Now Playing: Science for the People

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