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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 23, 2019


The age of water
Groundwater in Egypt's aquifers may be as much as 200,000 years old and that's important to know as officials in that country seek to increasing the use of groundwater, especially in the Eastern Desert, to mitigate growing water stress and allow for agricultural projects.
Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time
Years of home-schooling don't appear to influence the general health of children, according to a Rice University study.
Social media data reveal benefits or threats to biodiversity by visitors to nature locations
Social media data reveal global patterns of visitation rates, attractiveness and pressure to more than 12,000 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs).
Game theory highlights power of local reporting in vaccine decisions
Computational modeling of social networks suggests that vaccination programs are more successful in containing disease when individuals have access to local information about disease prevalence.
Bacteria in fermented food signal the human immune system, explaining health benefits
Researchers have discovered that humans and great apes possess a receptor on their cells that detects metabolites from bacteria commonly found in fermented foods and triggers movement of immune cells.
Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes
If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs?
Better gene knockout in aneuploid cell lines
CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones.
The new quadruped robot HyQReal tested by pulling 3 tons airplane
Researchers at IIT presented at ICRA 2019 the new version of the hydraulic quadruped robot HyQ: HyQReal.
Nerve stimulation could provide new treatment option for most common type of stroke
Research led by a UCLA scientist found that a new nerve stimulation therapy to increase blood flow could help patients with the most common type of stroke up to 24 hours after onset.
UC Davis study shows temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs
A UC Davis study that compared the effects of cold and warm temperatures on the development of frog eggs into larvae found that environmental temperature significantly changes how the nervous system develops.
Study predicts shift to smaller animals over next century
Researchers at the University of Southampton have forecast a worldwide move towards smaller birds and mammals over the next 100 years.
Variation of FTO gene linked to weight gain and obesity in children
Researchers have discovered that children who do not have obesity, but who are at risk for the chronic disease due to a common genetic variant eat more, according to a new study to be published in the June 2019 issue of Obesity.
Embedded psychiatrist in pediatric clinic improves evaluation access, short-term treatment
A novel method of embedding child psychiatric care in an urban pediatrics clinic was found to be feasible and a promising way to increase access to and engagement in psychiatric care among a primarily Latino population, according to new study from Boston Medical Center researchers.
These fruit bats trade food for sex
Egyptian fruit bat females living in captivity will consistently take food right from the mouths of their male peers.
Reading with toddlers reduces harsh parenting, enhances child behavior
People who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive, a Rutgers-led study finds.
Scientists recommend measures to contain rapid woody weed spread in Baringo County, Kenya
A team of international scientists, including CABI's Dr Urs Schaffner, have recommended ways to manage the devastating spread of the woody weed Prosopis juliflora, where in Baringo County, Kenya, its coverage rapidly increased by 2,031% in just 28 years.
Tortoises on the menu
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück, Germany, have observed wild chimpanzees in the Loango National Park, Gabon, eating tortoises.
Passive radiative cooling in delignified wood material
A newly engineered, wood-based material successfully reflects heat, or infrared radiation, and could cut the energy costs associated with cooling buildings by up to 50%, according to a modeling analysis of its application in 16 US cities.
Thoughts on body image in pregnancy important indicator of emotional wellbeing
Researchers have shown that a new way of assessing women's relationship with their bodies during pregnancy could help predict how well the mother might bond with her unborn baby and her longer-term emotional wellbeing.
Phase transitions: The math behind the music
Physics Professor Jesse Berezovsky contends that until now, much of the thinking about math and music has been a top-down approach, applying mathematical ideas to existing musical compositions as a way of understanding already existing music.
Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema
Piedmont Atlanta Hospital is the first in the state of Georgia to offer a new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema, a severe form of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).
New flatland material: Physicists obtain quasi-2D gold
Researchers from the MIPT Center for Photonics and 2D Materials have synthesized a quasi-2D gold film, showing how materials not usually classified as two-dimensional can form atomically thin layers.
Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment
Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science.
Why you should care about better fiber optics
With a new method, the gallium antimonide is initially distributed throughout the silicon.
Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region
Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.
New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves.
Information and language in news impact prejudice against minorities
Researchers at the Institute of Psychology show how news about immigrants and language describing immigrants shape prejudice against immigrants and other social minorities, as part of the project 'Immigrants in the Media.' For instance, nouns used for describing the ethnicity of immigrants enhance prejudice against immigrants more than adjectives.
Growing cardiovascular genetics field calls for special multidisciplinary clinical programs to better identify and treat inherited heart conditions
In a new scientific statement, the American Heart Association supports the creation of specialized multidisciplinary clinical programs that combine cardiovascular medicine and genetics expertise.
Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative
While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers.
Group practice of Transcendental Meditation dramatically reduced violence in Cambodia, new study shows
According to a new peer-reviewed study published in Studies in Asian Social Science, group practice of the Transcendental Meditation® and TM-Sidhi® programs in Cambodia between 1993 and 2008 was associated with a 96.2% decline in sociopolitical violence in that war-torn country compared to violence in the preceding three years.
Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18
A swarm of more than 3,000 small earthquakes in the Maple Creek area (in Yellowstone National Park but outside of the Yellowstone volcano caldera) between June 2017 and March 2018 are, at least in part, aftershocks of the 1959 quake.
How does the nervous system create behavior? Muscle activity map in Hydra gives insight
Accomplishing perhaps a world first, researchers at Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have mapped the full-body muscular activity of an animal while it was moving and behaving.
Study reveals the evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria
Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year.
Report finds California above national average for sexual harassment rates
A new study shows California sexual harassment rates above national average.
New approach captures detailed mid-infrared images for medical diagnostics
Researchers have developed a unique high-resolution imaging method that can capture mid-infrared spectral images of fast events or dynamic processes that take place on the order of milliseconds.
The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time
The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research.
New in Ethics & Human Research, May-June 2019
Parent experiences when approached for research in a pediatric intensive care unit, the role of inclusion benefits in ethics committee assessment of research, and more in the current issue.
First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity
The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.
Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation
Belgian research groups from the VIB, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, and the biotech company argenx have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma.
Artificial atomic scale materials: Discovering how electrons fatten!
A single and isolated electron has a clear electrical charge, magnetic moment and mass, and its free movement can be precisely predicted.
Could there be life without carbon? (video)
One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon.
Research reveals how personality affects susceptibility to persuasion
Researchers at Edge Hill University in England have helped identify personality traits which make people more (or less) susceptible to persuasion than others.
Targeting key gene could help lead to down syndrome treatment
Targeting a key gene before birth could someday help lead to a treatment for Down syndrome by reversing abnormal embryonic brain development and improving cognitive function after birth, according to a Rutgers-led study.
Chemical juggling with three particles
Chemists from the University of Bonn and their US colleagues at Columbia University in New York have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis.
A Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli
Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens.
Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage
One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves.
Virtual reality can spot navigation problems in early Alzheimer's disease
Virtual reality (VR) can identify early Alzheimer's disease more accurately than 'gold standard' cognitive tests currently in use, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.
Widespread permafrost degradation seen in high Arctic terrain
Rapid changes in terrain are taking place in Canada's high Arctic polar deserts due to increases in summer air temperatures.
Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology
A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.
Potential solutions for limiting exposure to Candida auris in healthcare facilities
Researchers show that procedures used to contain Candida auris infection in an animal facility can potentially be applied to hospitals and nursing homes to limit its spread.
Exposure to air pollution before and after birth may affect fundamental cognitive abilities
A study finds that exposure to fine particulate matter in the first years of life is associated with poorer performance in working memory and executive attention.
Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species
What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms?
Surprise: The survival of coral reefs hinges on the hidden lives of the sea's tiniest fishes
The survival of coral reef ecosystems and their menagerie of rainbowed residents relies on seldom seen, historically overlooked cryptobenthic reef fishes -- the smallest of marine vertebrates.
Scientists create new standard genome for heavily studied worm
A new Cornell University-led study finds that the genome for a widely researched worm, on which countless studies are based, was flawed.
On Mars, sands shift to a different drum
In the most detailed analysis of how sands move around on Mars, a team of planetary scientists led by the UA found that processes not involved in controlling sand movement on Earth play major roles on Mars.
100% renewables doesn't equal zero-carbon energy, and the difference is growing
While 160 companies around the world have committed to use '100% renewable energy,' that does not mean '100% carbon-free energy.' The difference will grow as power grids become less reliant on fossil power, according to a new Stanford study.
The effect of sleep quality on peptic-ulcer relapse in older adults
Poor sleep quality and peptic ulcer disease (PUD, a condition when sores known as ulcers develop on the lining of your stomach or in the first part of your small intestine) are both major public health problems that affect the physical and psychological wellbeing of older adults.
Chemistry of stars sheds new light on the Gaia Sausage
Chemical traces in the atmospheres of stars are being used to uncover new information about a galaxy, known as the Gaia Sausage, which was involved in a major collision with the Milky Way billions of years ago.
Marching for climate change may sway people's beliefs and actions
Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in.
Bringing human-like reasoning to driverless car navigation
With aims of bringing more human-like reasoning to autonomous vehicles, MIT researchers have created a system that uses only simple maps and visual data to enable driverless cars to navigate routes in new, complex environments.
Do physicians properly advise women with dense breasts on cancer risk?
A new study has shown that more than half of physicians -- primary care doctors and specialists -- may be unaware that dense breasts are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and nearly half reported not being aware of laws requiring physicians to inform women about mammography-related breast density risks and supplemental screening options.
Researchers investigate hormonal links between diet and obesity
Scientists have found another hint that time of day may play a role in how the body burns fuel, with implications for weight gain and heart health.
Interactive quantum chemistry in virtual reality
Scientists from the University of Bristol's Intangible Realities Laboratory (IRL) and ETH Zurich have used virtual reality and artificial intelligence algorithms to learn the details of chemical change.
Live fast, die young: Study shows tiny fishes fuel coral reefs
Scientists have long sought to understand how coral reefs support such an abundance of fish life despite their location in nutrient-poor waters.
How a zebrafish could help solve the mysteries of genetic brain disease
A close look at the rapidly developing zebrafish embryo is helping neuroscientists better understand the potential underpinnings of brain disorders, including autism and schizophrenia.
Oldest meteorite collection on Earth found in one of the driest places
Earth is bombarded every year by rocky debris, but the rate of incoming meteorites can change over time.
Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride
Indiana University researchers have synthesized a powerful new molecule to trap chloride salts.
Creativity: A question of impulsiveness
How can employees' working time be organized so as to enable them to perform in the best possible way when completing both creative and routine tasks?
A family of comets reopens the debate about the origin of Earth's water
Where did the Earth's water come from? Although comets, with their icy nuclei, seem like ideal candidates, analyses have so far shown that their water differs from that in our oceans.
Obsessive-compulsive disorder research needs more focus on patients, new study asserts
In a review of recent literature on obsessive-compulsive disorder, researcher/practitioner Professor Adam Radomsky writes that cognitive science is becoming further and further removed from the people those studies are supposed to help: OCD patients and the therapists who treat them.
Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada
Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada.
Tiny fish a big lure for life on coral reefs
Researchers from Simon Fraser University have discovered how coral reefs support such an abundance and diversity of life.
Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity
With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address.
Initially threatened by change, people adapt to societal diversity over time
With time, people can adapt to societal diversity and actually benefit from it, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Oxford.
High-intensity exercise may restore heart function in people with type 2 diabetes
University of Otago researchers have discovered that high-intensity exercise can reduce or reverse the loss in heart function caused by type 2 diabetes.
New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors
'A major aspect of our research is that it just really illustrates how complex all these different components are going on inside a person's body,' said Andrew Ford.
GRACE data contributes to understanding of climate change
The University of Texas at Austin team that led a twin satellite system launched in 2002 to take detailed measurements of the Earth, called the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), reports in the journal Nature Climate Change on the contributions that their nearly two decades of data have made to our understanding of global climate patterns.
Scientists proposed a novel configuration of nanoscopes
TPU scientists proposed using special diffraction gratings with gold plates instead of microlenses to accelerate the generation of images from nanoscopes without losing any magnification power.
The geometry of an electron determined for the first time
Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom.
Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents.
A step closer to identifying cause of a blinding disease
A recent study, led by researchers at McGill University and published in the journal Scientific Reports, offers an important step in unlocking the mystery of LHON's cause.
Did Leonardo da Vinci have ADHD?
Leonardo da Vinci produced some of the world's most iconic art, but historical accounts show that he struggled to complete his works.
Older male crickets attract more females -- but have less sex
Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them -- but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.
Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels
Wasted food can be affordably turned into a clean substitute for fossil fuels.
Building next gen smart materials with the power of sound
Researchers have used sound waves to precisely manipulate atoms and molecules, accelerating the sustainable production of breakthrough smart materials.
Women are less likely than men to be diagnosed with minor stroke
New study by University of Toronto and University of Calgary researchers find women experiencing a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are less likely to be diagnosed with a stroke compared to men -- even though they describe similar symptoms in emergency departments.
Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis
Researchers at EPFL are working on a technology to exploit osmotic energy -- a source of power that's naturally available at estuaries, where fresh water comes into contact with seawater.
Egyptian fruit bats trade food for sex
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that female Egyptian fruit bats form bonds with particular male bats to exchange mating for nourishment.
Energy storage in the Midwest and beyond: A timely analysis
As the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released an update to last year's order on energy storage, MRS Energy & Sustainability today publishes a timely collection of papers that unpack the issue of energy storage in the Midwest and beyond.
Researchers reveal new strategy for preventing holiday weight gain
To avoid putting on extra pounds at the holidays, researchers have found that US adults who engage in daily self-weighing can prevent holiday weight gain, according to a new study to be published in the June 2019 issue of Obesity.
Russian scientists discover one of the mechanisms of water formation on the moon
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered one of the mechanisms for how water forms on the moon.
Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica
Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap -- wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.
Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water
When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process.
Spanish flu may have lingered two years before 1918 outbreak and vaccine could have treated it
The most severe pandemic in recent history, killing some 50 million people worldwide, the Spanish influenza, may have emerged up to two years earlier than previously believed.
Scientists teach old worms new tricks
Model organisms have advanced the study of genomics, eukaryotic biology, and evolution.
Hot new approach to 'green' hydrogen production is 'next logical step'
Electrifying the conventional fossil-fueled approaches to steam-methane reforming (SMR) enables a 'greener' approach to industrial hydrogen production, one that maximizes methane conversion while limiting the formation of unwanted carbon byproducts, researchers report.
Efficient, stable thermoelectric module based on high-performance liquid-like materials
Based on high-performance liquid-like materials, scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics and Northwestern University innovatively fabricated a Cu2Se/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 thermoelectric module with eight n-type Ni/Ti/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 legs and eight p-type Ni/Mo/Cu2Se legs.
What we think we know -- but might not -- pushes us to learn more
Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.
A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi
A team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Meiji University, and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, led by Professor Takayuki Arazoe, has recently established a series of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of targeted gene disruption and new gene 'introduction' using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae.
Climate change may make the arctic tundra a drier landscape
With climate change, the Arctic tundra is likely to become drier.
How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics
A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing.
New study recommends legal recommendations for dealing with false memories in court
Although kids are known for their active imaginations, research shows that children are actually less likely than adults to create false memories.
Proof it's possible to enhance or suppress memories
Boston University neuroscientist Steve Ramirez and collaborators have published a new paper showing memories are pliable if you know which regions of the brain's hippocampus to stimulate, which could someday enable personalized treatment for people with PTSD, depression and anxiety.
Holidays disrupt drug routines of children with diabetes
Children with type 1 diabetes find it difficult to adhere to their drug routines during school holidays and weekends.
New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature
A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.
How plant cells neutralize the potential for self-harm
Photosynthesis makes our atmosphere oxygen-rich and forms the bedrock of our food supply.
Daily self-weighing can prevent holiday weight gain
Researchers at the University of Georgia have shown that a simple intervention -- daily self-weighing -- can help people avoid holiday weight gain.
Wolf-dog 'swarms' threaten Europe's wolves
'Swarms' of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research.
The healing power of fish skin for a dog named Stella
Michigan State University veterinarians used a creative approach to treat the burns of Stella, a 1-year-old Rottweiler puppy, who escaped a house fire.
Experimental fertility preservation provides hope for young men
Testicular tissue samples obtained from 189 males who were facing procedures that could imperil fertility were cryopreserved at one university, proving the feasibility of centralized processing and freezing of testicular tissue obtained from academic medical centers, including Children's National, scattered around the world.
Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria
Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell.
Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels
Joint Danish, Italian and German efforts reveal that low oxygen is required for proper development of plants.
New stimulant formulations emerging to better treat ADHD
A comprehensive new review of the expanding scope of stimulants available to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) serves as a valuable guide to clinicians as they choose from among the many new drug formulations and technologies available to treat this complex disorder.
Light and nanotechnology prevent bacterial infections on medical implants
An ICFO and B. Braun Surgical, S.A. study published in Nano Letters and highlighted in Nature Photonics reports on a new technique that could prevent bacterial contamination and infection in medical implants by using light combined with gold nanoparticles.
Family crucial to orca survival
Orcas live in stable, structured social groups. And their survival directly depends on it.
Studying the function of liver cancer genes in mini-organs
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute developed a human model in which they use organoids, or mini organs, to study the function of specific genes that are mutated in liver cancer.
Rare volcanic rocks lift lid on dangers of little-studied eruptions
Unusual rocks discovered on a remote mountainside have alerted scientists to the dangers posed by a little-studied type of volcano.
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: benefit remains unclear
Meaningful studies are lacking for certain patient groups. Disease-specific registries could help close the data gap.
Plumbene, graphene's latest cousin, realized on the 'nano water cube'
Nagoya University-led researchers have created 'plumbene,' a 2D-honeycomb sheet of lead atoms.
ALS research reveals new treatment approach
New research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) has revealed that a protein called membralin plays a key role in the disease process.
Menopausal changes to female heart happen earlier than thought
A new University of Guelph study is the first to reveal hidden changes that are happening to the female heart during perimenopause -- the stage before menopause sets in.
Carnegie Mellon researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties
A team of polymer chemists and engineers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties.
Tiny fish live fast, die young
Fish on coral reefs manage to thrive in isolated areas where there are very low levels of nutrients for them to use.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...