Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 02, 2019
Industry uses non-profit organisation to campaign against public health policies
A new study shows how a non-profit research organisation has been deployed by its backers from major food and beverage corporations to push industry-favorable positions to policy makers and international bodies under the guise of neutral scientific endeavor.

Using facial recognition technology to continuously monitor patient safety in the ICU
A team of Japanese scientists has used facial recognition technology to develop an automated system that can predict when patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk of unsafe behaviour such as accidentally removing their breathing tube, with moderate (75%) accuracy.

Law backs doctors who prescribe opioids to the dying
Some doctors fear litigation and professional ruin if they are seen to have overprescribed opioids to terminally ill patients, according to a University of Queensland researcher.

A treasure map to understanding the epigenetic causes of disease
Researchers have identified special regions of the genome where a blood sample can be used to infer epigenetic regulation throughout the body, allowing scientists to test for epigenetic causes of disease.

Blood transfusion during liver cancer surgery linked with higher risk of cancer recurrence and death
Receiving a blood transfusion during curative surgery for the most common type of liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) is associated with a much higher risk of cancer recurrence and dying prematurely, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress.

Enzalutamide improves survival for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer
Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, can improve outcomes for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), according to a large study presented by Christopher Sweeney, MBBS of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

No increase in deaths from cardiac arrests at the weekend
People admitted to NHS hospitals with a cardiac arrest over the weekend do not face a higher risk of dying compared to those admitted during the week, according to new research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference in Manchester.

Only one in five doctors aware of patient feedback about their care online, survey reveals
Around one in five doctors are aware of patient feedback about themselves on review and ratings websites, according to a new survey of health professionals.

Coffee not as bad for heart and circulatory system as previously thought
Drinking coffee might keep us up at night, but new research has given us a reason to sleep easy knowing that the popular drink isn't as bad for our arteries as some previous studies would suggest.

High body fat (but not BMI itself) linked to four-fold increase in mortality risk after heart bypass surgery
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Vienna, Austria (June 1-3, 2019) shows that mortality in patients who had undergone heart bypass surgery was over 4 times higher in individuals with a high body fat mass, while body mass index (BMI) by itself was not associated with an increase in mortality.

Chest cavity fire during emergency cardiac surgery
At this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress (the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology) in Vienna, Austria (1-3 June), doctors present the unique case of a man who suffered a flash fire in his chest cavity during emergency heart surgery caused by supplemental oxygen leaking from a ruptured lung.
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