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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 03, 2019


Large national study tracks veterans' health, highlights areas of unmet needs
For the first time, a large national population of United States veterans (3,000+) used the same standardized tool, PROMIS-29, that the general population uses for tracking health, and self-reported outcomes that matched physician diagnoses documented in medical records.
NRG Oncology trial sets new standard regimen for women with uterine carcinosarcomas
Results from the phase III NRG Oncology clinical trial GOG 0261 comparing paclitaxel plus carboplatin (PC) to paclitaxel plus ifosfamide (PI) in women with stage I-IV, recurrent carcinosarcoma of the uterus or ovary, indicate that the PC combination treatment should be considered a standard of care for this patient population.
Implementation of Oregon paid family leave to ensure equality critical, research finds
Oregon is considering a bill to implement paid family leave, House Bill 2005, following in the footsteps of Washington, which approved a similar policy in 2017.
'Organs in a dish' pave the way for personalized medicine in gut and liver disease
One of the most exciting advancements in stem cell research has been the development of organoid systems, which are organ-like three-dimensional structures that mimic their corresponding organ in vivo.
People living with HIV face premature heart disease and barriers to care
People living with HIV face a higher risk of developing diseases of the heart and blood vessels compared to people without the disease.
Nationwide study finds breast cancer patients unaware of surgical options
The majority of women who underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy surgeries for breast cancer report that the scars from those surgeries negatively affect their daily lives.
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, June 3, 2019
ORNL story tips: Tiny test fuels by ORNL explore new reactor fuels more rapidly; ORNL-developed computing method detects, reports bugs in VA's healthcare data system; new heat transport study in thermoelectric materials may lead to better heat-to-electricity conversion.
Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers
Thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, scientists are able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers.
Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget
A Rice University laboratory develops and shares a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials.
ESO contributes to protecting Earth from dangerous asteroids
The unique capabilities of the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope have enabled it to obtain the sharpest images of a double asteroid as it flew by Earth on May 25.
Countries' essential medicines lists vary greatly from one another & WHO's model list
Countries' essential medicines lists vary from one another and from the World Health Organization's (WHO) model list, pointing to a potential need for greater care in selecting medicines that best meet the health care priorities of a population, suggests a study led by Toronto's St.
Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?
Researchers at the Earlham Institute, UK, have developed a new method to reliably measure plant circadian clocks and how different plants respond to day and night, and that these circadian rhythms change as they age.
Cleveland researchers test novel gene therapy for glioblastoma
A novel gene therapy clinical trial for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) shows promising results.
In the aftermath of company scandals, auditors charge higher fees or leave
CU Denver researcher predicts that auditors notice and incorporate media-provided ESG information in their risk response, which has not been examined before.
Despite safety standard, laundry packet exposures increase in older children, adults
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Abigail Wexner Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center investigated trends in calls to poison control centers across the country for exposure to liquid laundry detergent packets.
New TAILORx data guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients
New data from TAILORx, the largest-ever breast cancer trial, guides adjuvant therapy in younger breast cancer patients with even greater precision than the original findings: no benefit from chemotherapy if age 50 or less with a score of 16-20 on the 21-gene Recurrence Score (RS) test and at low risk, clinically (determined by tumor size/histologic grade).
Exotic pets can become pests with risk of invasion
In a new study, a team of researchers gain further insight into the dynamics of the exotic pet trade and the role it plays in the introduction of invasive vertebrate populations across the globe.
New interaction between thin film magnets discovered
An international research team has made a discovery that could significantly improve racetrack memory devices storing the data in nanowires in the form of oppositely magnetized areas, so-called domains.
High-performance data processing technology through a new database partitioning method
Improve query performance 4.2 times in average compared with Apache Spark SQL which is widely used parallel query processing system in both academia and industry.
Meditation goes digital in new clinical trial
Scientists at UC San Francisco have developed a personalized digital meditation training program that significantly improved attention and memory in healthy young adults -- a group already at the peak of brain health -- in just six weeks.
Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting.
Lower-amp ECT appears effective against suicidal thoughts
Nearly half the amplitude typically used in standard electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) seems to be effective at treating suicidal thoughts, investigators report.
Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells
Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness, with the bacterium's toxins causing the damage.
No benefit from pazopanib in advanced kidney cancer after surgery to remove metastases
The results of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group's phase three trial, E2810, show no disease-free survival benefit with the use of one year of pazopanib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer) who had no evidence of disease following surgery to remove further metastases.
Ultrafast metal-ion batteries based on new organic cathode material have been developed
Researchers from Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology, IPCP RAS and D.I.
Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech
A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying to deal with the 'cocktail party effect.' The device can provide immediate multisensory enhancement without any training.
Concussion is a leading cause of injury for children in recreational sports
In a two-year study of children between ages 5-11 who play recreational sports, more suffered concussions than most any other sports-related injury.
New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease
Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease.
A little formula in first days of life may not impact breastfeeding at 6 months
A study has lodged a new kink in the breastfeeding dilemma that adds to the angst of exhausted new parents: While most newborns lose weight in the first days of life, do you or don't you offer a little formula after breastfeeding if the weight loss is more than usual?
Which brain hemorrhage patients have treatable underlying conditions
A new study identifies patients more likely to have underlying lesions from brain-bleeds, a finding that could help doctors treat the condition more rapidly.
Networking with ghosts in the machine... and speaking kettles
Imagine for just a moment that your kettle could speak?
LGBTQ adolescents experiencing weight-based bullying found to have increased substance use
Weight-based victimization among sexual and gender minority youth is associated with increased offs of alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and cigarette use.
Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans
A universal flu vaccine that could prevent a potential influenza pandemic has been a holy grail for epidemiologists around the world ever since the first flu vaccines were developed in 1938.
Fathers aid development of larger brains
The bigger the brain, the more intelligent a mammalian species is.
Heat, not drought, will drive lower crop yields, researchers say
Climate change-induced heat stress will play a larger role than drought stress in reducing the yields of several major US crops later this century, according to Cornell University researchers who weighed in on a high-stakes debate between crop experts and scientists.
Water management helped by mathematical model of fresh water lenses
In this paper, the homeostasis of water lenses was explained as an intricate interaction of the following physical factors: infiltration to the lens from occasional (sporadic) rains, permanent evaporation from the water table, buoyancy due to a density contrast of the fresh and saline water, and the force of resistance to water motion from the dune sand.
Research overcomes key obstacles to scaling up DNA data storage
Researchers have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems, addressing two of the key obstacles to widespread adoption of DNA data storage technologies.
Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms
Algal blooms in the Red Sea can be detected with a new method that accounts for dust storms and aerosols.
Diets of Latinos and blacks have greatest environmental impact per dollar spent on food
Despite spending less than white households on food overall, black and Latino households have more impact on the environment per dollar spent on food than white households, according to a new study published in Environmental Engineering Science.
How a leap of faith can take science forward
A new study by SMU Associate Professor Reddi Kotha reveals that language choices alone can influence whether inventors receive financial backing from their organizations.
A more accurate, low-cost 39 GHz beamforming transceiver for 5G communications
Researchers at Tokyo Tech and NEC Corporation, Japan, present a 39 GHz transceiver with built-in calibration for fifth-generation (5G) applications.
Lack of sleep may increase likelihood of teens engaging in risky sexual behaviors
Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may be at an increased risk of engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
Sponges collect penguin, seal, and fish DNA from the water they filter
Just like humans leave DNA in the places we inhabit, water-dwelling animals leave DNA behind in the water column.
To tackle child labor, start with consumers
A new study by SMU Assistant Professor Fang Xin finds evidence that educating consumers about the social impact of their purchases can help reduce child labor in global supply chains.
What causes battery electrode failure?
'It's impossible to have every single grain of rice identical in terms of their shapes and how far away it is to its neighbor,' Lin said.
Brush your teeth -- postpone Alzheimer's
Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway have discovered a clear connection between oral health and Alzheimer´s disease.
Wearable motion detectors identify subtle motor deficits in children
A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children whose impairments may be overlooked by doctors and parents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Measuring impact of product placement
Researchers from Indiana University and Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which reveals the impact of product placement in television programming.
Precision calibration empowers largest solar telescope
An article published in the SPIE publication Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems (JATIS), 'Polarization Modeling and Predictions for DKIST Part 5: Impacts of enhanced mirror and dichroic coatings on system polarization calibration,' marks a substantial advance in ensuring the accurate solar information measured and collected by the Daniel K.
Native Hawaiians at far greater risk for pancreatic cancer
Native Hawaiians are at highest risk for pancreatic cancer, according to a USC study that provides a surprising look at disparities surrounding the deadly disease.
NASA sees strong storms in developing gulf system 91L
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in the developing low pressure area designated as System 91L is it moved through the Gulf of Campeche just north of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula.
Anti hypertensive drug use was associated with a decreased dementia risk
Various clinical trials indicate what effects can be expected from standardized intervention programs on the basis of existing evidence.
Germline gene therapy pioneer, teenage son make case for safe treatment
An internationally known embryologist and his son make the case for using gene-editing tools to prevent inherited disease, in an editorial published today in the journal Nature Medicine.
Combination checkpoint blockade effective in pre-surgical setting for early-stage lung cancers
Neoadjuvant, or pre-surgical, treatment with nivolumab plus ipilimumab resulted in an overall major pathologic response (MPR) rate of 33 percent of treated patients with early-stage, resectable non-small cell lung cancers, meaning these patients had less than or equal to 10 percent viable tumor remaining at surgery.
Drug-resistant tuberculosis reversed in lab
About 1.5 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2017, making it the most lethal infectious disease worldwide.
Lithium boosts muscle strength in mice with rare muscular dystrophy
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that lithium improves muscle size and strength in mice with a rare form of muscular dystrophy that causes weakness in the shoulders and hips.
NCI-MATCH trial finds the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib effective
Findings from NCI-MATCH Arm H, orally presented on Monday, June 3rd at the ASCO 2019 annual meeting in Chicago, show that in a heavily pre-treated cohort of 17 distinct tumor types -- several rare -- with BRAF mutations, the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib showed promising activity outside of currently approved FDA indications.
Immune cells determine how fast certain tumors grow
By examining brain tumors in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Immunotherapy better than aggressive chemo as first-line treatment in head and neck cancer
Immunotherapy used with chemotherapy or on its own is a better first-line treatment for people with head and neck cancer that has returned than standard aggressive chemotherapy, new clinical trial results show.
Scientists stack algorithms to improve predictions of yield-boosting crop traits
To help researchers better predict high-yielding crop traits, a team from the University of Illinois have stacked together six high-powered, machine learning algorithms that are used to interpret hyperspectral data -- and they demonstrated that this technique improved the predictive power of a recent study by up to 15 percent, compared to using just one algorithm.
Phosphorylation of Regnase-1 lets IL-17 run amok
A research team led by Osaka University found that the cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 triggers the phosphorylation of mRNA-degrading enzyme Regnase-1, resulting in excessive inflammation.
NIH-supported study reveals a novel indicator of influenza immunity
A study of influenza virus transmission in Nicaraguan households reveals new insights into the type of immune responses that may be protective against influenza virus infection, report investigators.
Texas A&M research team develops bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D
A team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine.
Evidence of multiple unmonitored coal ash spills found in N.C. lake
Coal ash solids in sediments collected from Sutton Lake in 2015 and 2018 suggest the North Carolina lake has been contaminated by multiple coal-ash spills, most of them apparently unmonitored and unreported.
Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment
Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role in permanently removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
Sensitive new laser technique detects volatile organic compounds
Researchers have developed a new way of operating miniature quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to rapidly measure the absorption spectra of different organic molecules in the air simultaneously.
New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past
A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths.
Urban pollution enhances up to 400% formation of aerosols over the Amazon rainforest
This phenomenon affects cloud production and rainfall, with consequences for the local and global climate, which researchers have warned about in the study published in Nature Communications.
Bid to beat superbugs boosted by immune defence discovery
The fight against superbugs could be helped by the discovery of a potential therapy based on the body's natural immune defences.
Patients who received PBI without chemotherapy experienced less fatigue, slightly poorer cosmesis
Patient-reported outcome (PRO) data indicates that partial breast irradiation (PBI) is more convenient than whole breast irradiation (WBI) for women with breast cancer who do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy.
US abortion politics: How did we get here and where are we headed?
After Roe v. Wade, the pro-life movement accelerated rapidly, describes Munson in a new paper, 'Protest and Religion: The US Pro-Life Movement,' published last week in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics.
Adding targeted therapy to treatment extends lives of those with metastatic breast cancer
A UCLA-led study has found that using a drug called ribociclib in combination with a common hormone therapy may help premenopausal women with the most common type of breast cancer live longer than if they only receive the hormone therapy.
CRISPR baby mutation significantly increases mortality
Six months ago, a Chinese scientist announced that he had edited the genomes of two babies born last year.
Study delivers insight into possible origins of immunological memory
Natural killer cells are part of the innate immune system.
Newfound autoimmune syndrome causes muscle pain, weakness
A previously unknown autoimmune muscle disease involving sudden onset of debilitating muscle pain and weakness has been identified by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Major stem cell discovery to boost research into development and regenerative medicine
A new approach has enabled researchers to create Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) of both pig and human cells.
Feathers came first, then birds
New research, led by the University of Bristol, suggests that feathers arose 100 million years before birds -- changing how we look at dinosaurs, birds, and pterosaurs, the flying reptiles.
Pop-up parks deliver big benefits in small spaces
'Pop-up parks' represent one possible means to help meet the demands of urbanites for more opportunities to connect with nature in their neighborhoods, serve important conservation functions by providing small-scale habitat refuges for a wide variety of threatened plants and animals in urban environments, and deliver a suite of ecosystem services to urban residents and wildlife alike.
Mapping groundwater's influence on the world's oceans
Researchers at The Ohio State University have created high-resolution maps of points around the globe where groundwater meets the oceans -- the first such analysis of its kind, giving important data points to communities and conservationists to help protect both drinking water and the seas.
Emotions from touch
Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by the psychologists from the Higher School of Economics in a recent empirical study.
Most detailed X-ray image of batteries yet to reveal why they still aren't good enough
A multi-institute team of researchers has developed the most comprehensive view yet of lithium-ion battery electrodes, where most damage typically occurs from charging them repeatedly.
An island haven for frogs in a sea of extinctions
New Guinea is one of the only places in the world where frogs are safe from the chytrid fungus that has made more than 90 species extinct.
UNH researchers find slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar
According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, when the rate of the Earth's air temperature slows down for a significant amount of time, so can phenology.
Climate action urgently required to protect human health in Europe
In this landmark report, the European Academies' Science Advisory Council (EASAC) focuses on the consequences of climate change for human health in Europe and the benefits of acting now to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to stabilize the climate.
New sub-species of pilot whale identified in Pacific Ocean
Short-finned pilot whales are found over a wide swath of the world's oceans, with habitats in the Indian, and Pacific, and North Atlantic oceans.
How common is nonsuicidal self-injury among sexual minority, heterosexual adolescents?
This study describes how common nonsuicidal self-injury has been over time among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents.
UT Southwestern develops test to predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancer
A novel imaging test shows promise for identifying kidney cancer patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy.
Plastic water bottles may one day fly people cross-country
A research group led by Washington State University scientists has found a way to turn regular plastic waste products into jet fuel.
POLO trial for advanced pancreatic cancer: a new standard of care
Treatment with the drug olaparib significantly reduced the risk of disease progression or death from metastatic pancreatic cancer, according to findings from the recently completed, international, phase-III POLO (Pancreas cancer OLaparib Ongoing) trial.
Video GP surgeries could curb need for face-to-face visits
Patients consulting their doctor by video link could reduce the need for GP visits but it is not suitable for everyone, a pilot study led by the University of Edinburgh has found.
What's your attitude about body hair removal?
New study lays bare cultural reasons around the globe for bikini waxing and man-scaping.
Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV
The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA.
Quality -- not quantity -- of sleep linked to better health in teens
With summer break and longer days ahead, parents of young teens may be wondering whether to let good sleep habits slide over the next couple of months.
Study looks at path to recovery of full daily function after mild TBI
This study describes the path to recovery of daily function in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using data from a study that followed a group of patients with mTBI over time.
Study: Underrepresented faculty play an uneven role in advancing diversity and inclusion
A team of researchers at Colorado State surveyed faculty members from ecology and evolutionary biology programs at universities across the United States and found that while most respondents reported engaging in diversity and inclusion activities, those who participated in these activities at the highest levels were more likely to identify themselves as non-white, non-male or the first generation in their family to attend college.
NUS researchers uncovers promising cancer target for liposarcoma
A study conducted by a team of researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore has revealed a close association between liposarcoma (LPS), a type of cancer that develops from fat cells, and the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein family.
Research sheds light on the importance of police trust in the public
A recent study finds that police officers who place more trust in the public are also more likely to pursue cases on their own initiative -- termed proactive policing -- and have higher arrest rates.
Ready, jet... print!
Inkjet printing could produce high-efficiency organic solar cells with commercial potential.
Downpours of torrential rain more frequent with global warming
The number of extreme downpours increased steadily between 1964 and 2013 -- a period when global warming also intensified, according to research published in the journal Water Resources Research.
Plant lineage points to different evolutionary playbook for temperate species
An ancient, cosmopolitan lineage of plants is shaking up scientists' understanding of how quickly species evolve in temperate ecosystems and why.
Six fingers per hand
A congenital additional finger brings motor advantages.
Accurate probing of magnetism with light
Probing magnetic materials with extreme ultraviolet radiation allows to obtain a detailed microscopic picture of how magnetic systems interact with light -- the fastest way to manipulate a magnetic material.
Physicists can predict the jumps of Schrodinger's cat (and finally save it)
Yale researchers have figured out how to catch and save Schrödinger's famous cat, the symbol of quantum superposition and unpredictability, by anticipating its jumps and acting in real time to save it from proverbial doom.
Organ and tissue donation in patients considering MAiD: new guidance helps navigate emerging area
A new publication in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) aims to help health care teams navigate clinical and ethical issues that arise when patients choose to donate organs or tissue after medical assistance in dying (MAiD) or withdrawal of life-sustaining measures.
Researchers develop new method to gauge atmosphere's ability to clear methane
Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) react with methane and break it down, but it's been hard for scientists to get a handle on how much OH is present in the atmosphere at high-enough spatial and temporal resolution to be useful.
Tuning the topological insulator Sb2Te3: Just add iron
Iron-doping of the topological insulator Sb2Te3 results in useful electronic and magnetic properties, quantified in a recent FLEET study at the University of Wollongong.
Ecosystem service mapping and assessment: Research collection on methods and applications
Methods, data, applications and research insights to guide scientists and practitioners through the process of mapping and assessment of ecosystems and their services are the topic of the latest open science collection published in the open-access journal One Ecosystem.
Suggested benefit in PCV chemoradiotherapy for both IDH-mutant WHO-defined molecular subgroups
A recent, updated predictive analysis of the three WHO-defined molecular subgroups based on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH) mutation status and 1p/19q co-deletion status represented in the high-risk treatment arms of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 9802 indicates that both IDH-mutant sub-groups (IDHmut-noncodel and IDHmut-codel) could benefit from the addition of PCV chemotherapy to radiotherapy treatment.
Is 'clean eating' just dirty rhetoric?
Study looks at #cleaneating as a healthy or harmful dietary strategy and explores perceptions of clean eating and associations with disordered eating among young adults.
Researchers explore augmented ACL reconstruction procedure
An innovative procedure that explores the use of amnion, bone marrow concentrate and suture tape in ACL reconstruction may result in earlier return to play protocols for athletes, suggests a new study from the Marshall University Joan C.
Losing muscle to fat: misdirected fate of a multipotent stem cell drives LGMD2B
The sudden appearance of clinical symptoms in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B is due to a unique extracellular environment in which a specific membrane repair protein coaxes fibro/adipogenic precursors to first proliferate and then differentiate into fatty tissue, rather than play their normal role of helping the muscle fibers repair.
Grassland areas should be chosen wisely
According to researchers from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University, choosing the best areas to convert from cereals to grasslands depends on whether you prioritize improvement of nature and the aquatic environment, how much biomass you can produce, or how much land is needed to so do -- or a combination.
New research addresses incidence of atrial fibrillation after aortic valve replacement
UAB investigators have outlined the incidence and implications of atrial fibrillation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.
For many, friends and family, not doctors, serve as a gateway to opioid misuse
In a common narrative of the path to opioid misuse, people become addicted to painkillers after a doctor prescribed them pills to treat an injury and then, later, switch to harder drugs, such as heroin.
A fast all-visible-light molecular switch with 100 nm band separation
A consortium of scientists from the Medical Imaging Center (University Medical Center Groningen), Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (University of Amsterdam), Palacky University in Olomouc, the University of Nantes, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry (University of Groningen) and the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy in Florence have developed an entirely new class of molecular photoswitches that meet many of the 'holy grail' requirements so far thought to be impossible to achieve.
Combination of water scarcity and inflexible demand puts world's river basins at risk
Nearly one-fifth of the world's population lives in a stressed water basin where the next climate change-driven incident could threaten access to an essential resource for agriculture, industry and life itself, according to a paper by University of California, Irvine researchers and others, published today in Nature Sustainability.
Researchers first to develop models of 'seeds and soil' to combat breast cancer metastasis
Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have identified key biological pathways that regulate the spread of tumor cells to vital organs.
International clinical trial of new drug for men with advanced prostate cancer yields strong result
First results of phase III international clinical study called TITAN, which evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a new drug, apalutamide, to treat advanced prostate cancers.
SYNGO Consortium releases public data resource for universal reference in synapse research
Disruptions to the brain's synapses lie at the root of many disorders.
Vitamin D could help cancer patients live longer
Michigan State University physicians have found that vitamin D, if taken for at least three years, could help cancer patients live longer.
2017 North Korean nuclear test 10 times larger than previous tests, new study finds
North Korea detonated a nuclear device in 2017 equivalent to about 250 kilotons of TNT, a new study in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth estimates.
Featured research findings from Nutrition 2019
Press materials are now available for Nutrition 2019, the flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, to be held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center.
2D crystals conforming to 3D curves create strain for engineering quantum devices
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory explored how atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals can grow over 3D objects and how the curvature of those objects can stretch and strain the crystals.
New device sheds light on mechanism, efficacy of arthritis treatment
The debate over how one of the most popular osteoarthritis treatments should be federally regulated could change, thanks to a Cornell University study and a new device that provides a better understanding of the science behind hyaluronic acid (HA) injections.
Snapshot of chikungunya could lead to drugs, vaccines for viral arthritis
A team at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers
Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont.
Trap-and-release accelerates study of swimming ciliated cells
J. Mark Meacham and Minji Kim in his lab studied cilia in an acoustic trap that allows them to analyze hundreds of cells in minutes.
An effective sweeper closes DNA replication cycling
IBS scientists reported a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of PCNA cycling during DNA replication.
Can computers make decisions like humans? A new study may have the answer
A team of British researchers has developed a method that enables computers to make decisions in a way that is more similar to humans.
Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals
Floriculture is an economically important industry in Michigan. The health of these crops is threatened by Pythium ultimum (root rot), a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants.
Supercomputing dynamic earthquake rupture models
Multiple interactions found in postulated network of faults in the Brawley seismic zone in southern California.
Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought, study finds
A new study UC Irvine and collaborators of Patagonia's ice fields finds that many glaciers in the region are much thicker than previously thought.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...