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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 04, 2019


Fear of 'killer shrimps' could pose major threat to European rivers
The fear of invasive 'killer shrimps' can intimidate native organisms to such a degree that they are incapable of performing their vital role in river systems, a new study suggests.
'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas
As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up.
Female cannabis users underrepresented in health research, study reveals
Research at the University of York has shown that women are underrepresented in research into links between cannabis and psychosis, which could limit understanding of the impact of the drug.
Smartphone relaxation app helps some manage migraine
Migraine sufferers who used a smartphone-based relaxation technique at least twice a week experienced on average four fewer headache days per month, a new study shows.
Researchers discover cells that change their identity during normal development
The ability of a developed cell to transform into another type of cell is exceptionally rare.
Gene mutation evolved to cope with modern high-sugar diets
A common gene mutation helps people cope with modern diets by keeping blood sugar low, but close to half of people still have an older variant that may be better suited to prehistoric diets, finds a new UCL-led study.
Separation anxiety no more: A faster technique to purify elements
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new chemical separation method that is vastly more efficient than conventional processes, opening the door to faster discovery of new elements, easier nuclear fuel reprocessing, and, most tantalizing, a better way to attain actinium-225, a promising therapeutic isotope for cancer treatment.
Lymphoma trial finds combination targeted therapy effective prior to chemotherapy
Results of a Phase II clinical trial conducted at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed that combination targeted therapy, consisting of rituximab, lenalidomide and ibrutinib (RLI), had an 84.6 percent overall response rate (ORR) and 38.5% complete response rate (CRR) when given prior to any chemotherapy for newly diagnosed patients with a specific type of diffuse large b-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).
Could boosting the gut microbiome be the secret to healthier older age?
Fecal transplants from young to aged mice can stimulate the gut microbiome and revive the gut immune system, a study by immunologists at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK, has shown.
Labels of US probiotic products lacking, researchers find
When it comes to buying probiotics, most product labels do not give consumers enough information to make an informed decision, according to a Georgetown University Medical Center research team.
New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock
Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work.
Antibiotic produced by the microbiome kills bacteria by disturbing energy metabolism
A research team from the universities of Tübingen and Göttingen as well as from the German Center for Infection Research has investigated the mode of action of a new class of antibiotics that is highly effective against multidrug-resistant pathogens.
Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age
With the help of the common fruit fly (D. melanogaster), which ages quickly because it only lives about 60 days, FAU neuroscientists provide insights into healthy aging by investigating the effects of a foraging gene on age and stress tolerance.
Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process
Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells.
Rare fossils provide more detailed picture of biodiversity during Middle Ordovician
Marine fossil specimens unearthed in northern Portugal are filling a gap in understanding evolution during the Middle Ordovician period.
Gene-edited chicken cells resist bird flu virus in the lab
Scientists have used gene-editing techniques to stop the bird flu virus from spreading in chicken cells grown in the lab.
Sticking to sports can help kids adjust
By participating in organized physical activity from the age of 6, children will have less risk of emotional difficulties by the time they're 12, a new Canadian study finds.
SwRI's ActiveVision enables transportation agencies to automate traffic monitoring
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has announced the release of ActiveVision, a machine vision tool that transportation agencies can use to autonomously detect and report traffic condition changes.
Salmon get a major athletic boost via a single enzyme
A single enzyme anchored to the walls of salmons' blood vessels helps reduce how hard their hearts have to work during exercise by up to 27%.
Bees can link symbols to numbers: Study
We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math.
Companies battling shareholder complaints have a potent weapon-advertising
A new study in the Journal of Marketing explores how firms can configure advertising investments to respond to shareholder complaints and limit the damage of these public battles.
Would you eat genetically modified food if you understood the science behind it?
While genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered safe by an overwhelming majority of scientists, only about one third of consumers share that view.
Limiting warming to 2 degrees C will require emission cuts across entire food system
Better understanding agriculture and the food system's unique place in climate change -- as both drivers of climate change and victims of it -- is helping to increase support for climate action.
Everything will connect to the internet someday, and this biobattery could help
In the future, small paper and plastic devices will be able to connect to the internet for a short duration, providing information on everything from healthcare to consumer products, before they are thrown away.
Researchers identify link between more frequent, intense heat events and deaths in Las Vegas
New research led by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) traces the relationship between extreme heat and mortality rates, identifying a clear correlation between heat wave episodes and heat-related deaths in Las Vegas over the last ten years.
Heart disease deaths nearly halved in a decade -- but condition remains UK's biggest killer
A new analysis of global heart disease deaths has revealed the number of UK people dying from the condition halved between 2005 and 2015, with the death rate falling from 80 deaths per 100,000 to 46 per 100,000.
Building blocks of the Earth
Geologists from the Universities of Cologne and Bonn gain new insights regarding the Earth's composition by analysing meteorites.
Home exercise program reduces rate of falling in at-risk seniors
An in-home exercise program reduced subsequent falls in high-risk seniors by 36%, according the results of a 12-month clinical trial published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Glyphosate in tampons? No indication of residues of any health significance
Just like other feminine hygiene products, tampons consist mainly of cotton.
Novel insights into cholesterol regulation may lead to new therapies for heart disease
In a landmark study, scientists at Houston Methodist Research Institute discovered what makes white blood cell counts spike in individuals who have high cholesterol, possibly leading to new therapies for heart disease.
Beta blockers can block the effects of stress and anger in patients prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation
Individuals who are prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from taking beta blockers.
Researchers study surveillance MRI in breast cancer survivors
The addition of breast MRI to mammography in screening breast cancer survivors for new cancers results in higher cancer detection rates, but also more biopsies that are benign, according to a large study.
Do images of food on kids' clothes influence eating behavior?
As some sweet treat fans celebrate National Doughnut Day on June 7, 2019 a pediatrician examines the new trend of donuts showing up on children's clothing.
You survived a heart attack -- now what about the depression?
Heart attack patients with prolonged depression or anxiety are at a higher risk of death.
High blood pressure during pregnancy increases risk of heart attacks and strokes
Women who have high blood pressure during their pregnancies, or a related more severe condition called pre-eclampsia, are at much higher risk of heart attacks and strokes than those who have normal blood pressure, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference today in Manchester.
Estimating the wear and tear of ice on structures over coming decades or even centuries
Mechanisms behind the effects of ice on physical structures -- particularly over the long term -- have remained an open question in a time of continuous environmental change.
Frogs find refuge in elephant tracks
Frogs need elephants. That's what a new WCS-led study says that looked at the role of water-filled elephant tracks in providing predator-free breeding grounds and pathways connecting frog populations.
Widowed and divorced men more at risk of dying from serious heart conditions than women
Surviving some of the most common heart and circulatory diseases may be impacted by your gender and marital status, according to new research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference in Manchester.
Is there a demographic need for migration in Europe?
A European Commission-IIASA flagship report has found that an increase in the EU population aged 65+ is certain -- regardless of higher fertility or migration.
Beta blockers reduce stress-induced irregular heart rhythm
Taking beta blockers -- medications that reduce blood pressure and treat many heart conditions -- can blunt the negative effects of stress and anger on people with a history of atrial fibrillation, or irregular heart rhythm, said Yale researchers.
Researchers develop breakthrough process to create cancer-killing drugs
A new strategy for drug development can be used to produce targeted therapies against a variety of diseases.
Physical inactivity proved risky for children and pre-teens
At what age do children lose the desire to exercise?
Exposing modern forgers
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger used old materials.
Brains of children with epilepsy able to re-map after surgery to retain visual perception
For children with severe epilepsy, surgery is the last resort used to prevent seizures but the treatment can often come with the risk of both visual and cognitive impairments.
Deep learning techniques teach neural model to 'play' retrosynthesis
Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new technique based on reinforcement learning that trains a neural network model to correctly select the 'best' reaction at each step of the retrosynthetic process.
New approach optimizes use of future wave electricity generators during disaster
When hurricanes strike, electricity loss ranks as one of the top concerns.
Exercise fine-tunes brain's connections, eases autism spectrum disorder in mouse model
A mouse model of autism has revealed how exercise changes the structure of the brain by eliminating the excess connections between neurons characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
For Latinos with diabetes, new study looks at ways to improve medication adherence
A new study shows certain lifestyle changes and low-cost interventions may improve how Latino patients with diabetes manage their medication regimen.
Exomoons may be home to extra-terrestrial life
Computer simulations were run to calculate whether a moon orbiting outside the ring system of J1407b caused gaps.
How chronic inflammation may drive down dopamine and motivation
A new computational method will allow scientists to measure the effects of chronic inflammation on energy availability and effort-based decision-making.
Mortality rate 'weekend effect' not a reliable measure of care quality in hospitals
The higher mortality rate for weekend hospital admissions should not be used as an indicator of quality of care due to the lack of data preceding patient admission and on the severity of their illness, a new study conducted at the University of Warwick Medical School has concluded.
Nitric oxide-scavenging hydrogel developed for rheumatoid arthritis treatment
The research team of POSTECH utilized NO-cleavable-crosslinker that reacts to NO and developed a NO-scavenging nano-sized hydrogel (NO-Scv gel).
Using physics to print living tissue
3D printers can be used to make a variety of useful objects by building up a shape, layer by layer.
Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution, according to Conco
Concordia University biology professor Jean-Philippe Lessard reviews the ant traits system developed by Alan Andersen and calls for the creation of a global framework to help categorize the world's ant population.
Exploring deeper understanding and better description of networks
In network science, switching the focus from node degrees to network cycles could reveal many interesting properties from the perspective of totally homogenous networks.
'Cannibalism' is a double-whammy for cell health
University of Sydney mathematician Hugh Ford has developed a model tested by experiment that shows cell cannibalism is an important driver in the build-up of cholesterol and other harmful materials.
Red and white meats are equally bad for cholesterol
Contrary to popular belief, consuming red meat and white meat such as poultry, have equal effects on blood cholesterol levels, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
'Only the stressed die young'
A new study has found that fruit flies lacking the transcription factor Ets21c live longer in a favourable, unstressed environment, but die earlier under stress.
Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business
Mathematicians from Queen Mary University of London have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead.
Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)
A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests.
Civility still matters to some in cyberspace
In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the ''best answer.''
Dowsing for electric fields in liquid crystals
Nematic liquid crystals can be oriented in a curious way termed the 'dowser texture', which is sensitive to external conditions.
No increased risk of birth defects in children of fathers treated for testicular cancer
New research has found no increased risk of congenital malformations associated with treatment with radiotherapy or chemotherapy in children of fathers with testicular cancer.
Vulnerability to Ebola and Lassa fever can now be properly assessed
Identifying vulnerabilities to outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever is possible following new research from the University of Surrey and University of Cambridge.
Killing the unkillable cancer cells
We all know someone affected by the battle against cancer.
Study: Cholesterol in eggs tied to cardiac disease, death
The risk of heart disease and death increases with the number of eggs an individual consumes, according to a UMass Lowell nutrition expert who has studied the issue.
The Lancet Psychiatry: Despite increase in rates of non-suicidal self-harm, few people receive medical or psychological support
A new study of non-suicidal self-harm in England, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, suggests that rates grew from around 2% to 6% of the population between 2000 and 2014.
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop.
Sleepless nights linked to high blood pressure
A bad night's sleep may result in a spike in blood pressure that night and the following day, according to new research led by the University of Arizona.
Children's brains reorganize after epilepsy surgery to retain visual perception
Children can keep full visual perception -- the ability to process and understand visual information -- after brain surgery for severe epilepsy, according to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
New process to rinse heavy metals from soils
Poisonous heavy metals contaminating thousands of sites nationwide threaten to enter the food chain, and there's been no easy way to remove them.
Extra finger 'birth defect' could provide blueprint for robotic extra limbs
New research on two people born with extra functional fingers has shown how the brain adapts to the workload imposed by more digits.
Researchers develop superconducting quantum refrigerator
University of Rochester researchers harnessed superconductivity to conceive of a quantum refrigerator that could cool atoms to nearly absolute zero temperatures.
Psychological model of defectologist's readiness for professional development
In this new paper, the researchers theorize that professional competences of a defectologist (a Russian term for educators engaged in assisted teaching for disabled individuals) rely on their psychological readiness for such a profession.
Chemists could make 'smart glass' smarter by manipulating it at the nanoscale
Colorado State University chemists have devised a potentially major improvement to both the speed and durability of smart glass by providing a better understanding of how the glass works at the nanoscale.
UV light may illuminate improvements for next generation electronic devices
NITech scientists have developed the method to make sure the mechanisms to connect between the two-dimensional layer of atoms and the semiconductors as perfect as possible, which will lead to develop novel optoelectronic devices.
NASA-NOAA satellite sees system 91L's eeach into the western gulf of Mexico
System 91L is an area of tropical low pressure located in the Bay of Campeche.
Solving the sun's super-heating mystery with Parker Solar Probe
It's one of the greatest and longest-running mysteries surrounding, quite literally, our sun -- why is its outer atmosphere hotter than its fiery surface?
UTA researcher uses nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to combat cancer
A physicist at The University of Texas at Arlington has proposed a new concept for treating cancer cells, further advancing the University's status as a leader in health and the human condition.
New way to estimate current induced magnetization switching efficacy in ultrathin systems
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from South Ural State University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed an alternative method for numerical evaluation of the current induced local magnetization effect in ultrathin ruthenium-cobalt-ruthenium films with a wolfram layer added.
WVU study: Diabetics exposed to common household chemicals have lower heart disease rates
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deemed exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances -- a class of chemicals used in cookware, cleaning products and paint--a public health concern.
Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals
Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems.
A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera.
Scientists crack origin of the Persian walnut
Prized worldwide for its high-quality wood and rich flavor of delicious nuts, the Persian walnut (Juglans regia) is an important economic crop.
Opioids are not sleep aids, and can actually worsen sleep research finds
Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics from the University of Warwick in partnership with Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
Many kids with pneumonia get unnecessary antibiotics, chest X-rays
Preschool children with community-acquired pneumonia often receive unnecessary tests and treatment at outpatient clinics and emergency departments, according to a nationally representative study led by Todd Florin, M.D., MSCE, from Ann & Robert H.
Choosing the right drug to fight cancer
Biochemists at Université de Montreal discover a new mechanism to better predict whether an anti-cancer therapy will work.
Deaths from falls increase among older US adults
Death rates from falls for US adults 75 or older increased from 2000 to 2016 in this study that analyzed nationally representative vital statistics data.
Should STEMI patients recover in the ICU?
Providers need more clear guidance on whether a patient who has suffered from STEMI heart attack should recover in the intensive care unit, a new University of Michigan study, published in The BMJ, finds.
Snout dated: Slow-evolving elephant shark offers new insights into human physiology
Slow-evolving elephant shark reveals hormonal adaptation and offers new insights into human physiology.
Early lives of Alaska sockeye salmon accelerating with climate change
An ample buffet of freshwater food, brought on by climate change, is altering the life history of one of the world's most important salmon species.
Consumers want food labelling details spoon-fed
A new study found consumers want information on bioengineered foods -- they just want it spoon-fed to them.
Scientists call on funders to make research freely available immediately
Scientific research usually takes months to be published by academic journals, and once it is, many of the papers can only be read by scientists from wealthy institutes that subscribe to the journals.
The physical limit of quantum optics resolves a mystery of computational complexity
Recently, Prof. Man-Hong Yung, associate professor of SUSTech and his colleagues published a paper 'Universal bound on sampling bosons in linear optics and its computational implications' in National Science Review (NSR), offering a complete solution to the open problem posed by Prof.
New material with magnetic shape memory
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have developed a new material whose shape memory is activated by magnetism.
Dartmouth study reveals how ACOs use home visits to improve care and reduce hospital use
Dartmouth-led study offers new details about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are using home visits to improve care management and identify patient needs while aiming to reduce costs.
Facial bones of black adults age differently than other races, Rutgers study finds
Facial bones in black adults maintain higher mineral density as they age than other races, resulting in fewer changes to their facial structure, a Rutgers study finds.
Geoscience data group urges all scientific disciplines to make data open and accessible
Institutions, science funders, data repositories, publishers, researchers and scientific societies from all scientific disciplines must work together to ensure all scientific data are easy to find, access and use, according to a new commentary in Nature by members of the Enabling FAIR Data Steering Committee.
Bats have an ambulance in their ears
'The Doppler shift patterns produced by the ear motions could give these bat species the option to concentrate their energy in a narrow frequency band yet be also able to tell target direction.'
Opioid analgesics increase the risk of pneumonia among persons with Alzheimer's disease
Opioid analgesics were associated with a 30% increase in the risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...