Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 05, 2019


Nanotechnology treatment shows promise against multiple sclerosis
A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers.
Combating undetected lung inflammation in patients with an autoimmune disorder
An observational study involving 50 patients with APECED -- a genetic autoimmune disorder -- has demonstrated that targeting T and B cell activity combats a serious lung-related complication often overlooked or misdiagnosed in patients with the condition.
Video gamers design brand new proteins
By encoding their specialized knowledge into the computer game Foldit, university researchers enabled citizen scientists to successfully design synthetic proteins for the first time.
Study offers comprehensive roadmap for regulating political activity by nonprofits
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer's comprehensive approach yields surprising and controversial solutions, beginning with the creation of a simple and broad definition of political activity that charities will be prohibited from engaging in.
A biomarker for diagnosing celiac disease in people on a gluten-free diet
Researchers at the UPV/EHU and the BioCruces-Bizkaia Institute of Healthcare Research (IIS) have recently published an article in the Human Molecular Genetics journal in which they report on the discovery of a biomarker that could enable celiac disease to be diagnosed in the blood of people on a gluten-free diet.
Human impact on the activities and social behaviour of urban capuchin monkeys
To better understand how primates adapt to the increasing presence of humans, researchers monitored a group of 17 capuchin monkeys for a year and a half.
Salty diet reduces tumor growth by tackling immune cells
A study by an international research team led by Professor Markus Kleinewietfeld (VIB-UHasselt) shows that high salt intake inhibits tumor growth in mice.
New mechanism allows lower energy requirement for OLED displays
Scientists from RIKEN and the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with international partners have found a way to significantly reduce the amount of energy required by organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).
Visible public health leadership needed to boost vaccine coverage
Public health expert Professor John Ashton is calling for local directors of public health to provide visible leadership to address the recent systematic deterioration of vaccine coverage levels.
Brain disorder leaves lasting legacy of disability, study finds
Four out of five people with a hidden brain condition that causes limb weakness or paralysis experience lasting physical difficulties.
Telomere length unaffected by smoking
A new study has surprised the medical world, finding that smoking does not shorten the length of telomeres -- a marker at the end of our chromosomes that is widely accepted as an indicator of aging.
Was Mona Lisa's smile a lie?
Using chimeric, or mirror, images researchers have determined that one half of Mona Lisa's smile displays happiness while the other half is neutral reflecting a non-genuine emotion.
Economic downturns may affect children's mental health
Research linking economic conditions and health often does not consider children's mental health problems.
A pluralistic approach to thinking about the human microbiome
In 'The Conceptual Ecology of the Human Microbiome,' published in the June 2019 issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology, Nicolae Morar and Brendan J.
'Lubricating' sediments were critical in making the continents move
Plate tectonics is a key geological process on Earth, shaping its surface, making it unique among the Solar System's planets.
US soldiers have worse heart health than civilians
A smaller proportion of active Army personnel are in ideal cardiovascular health compared to civilians.
Working landscapes can support diverse bird species
Privately-owned, fragmented forests in Costa Rica can support as many vulnerable bird species as can nearby nature reserves, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
As hot as the sun's interior
Physicists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) have developed a new method for producing plasma, enabling them to deal with some of the problems that stand in the way of this extremely difficult process.
Verifying 'organic' foods
Organic foods are increasingly popular -- and pricey. Organic fruits and vegetables are grown without synthetic pesticides, and because of that, they are often perceived to be more healthful than those grown with these substances.
DNA from 31,000-year-old milk teeth leads to discovery of new group of ancient Siberians
Two children's milk teeth buried deep in a remote archaeological site in north eastern Siberia have revealed a previously unknown group of people lived there during the last Ice Age.
Is there a limit to human endurance? Science says yes
From the Ironman to the Tour de France, some competitions test even the toughest endurance athletes.
The Earth's rotation moves water in Lake Garda
Lake Garda has not yet revealed all of its secrets.
Estimating microplastic consumption
Since the mass production of plastics began in the 1940s, the versatile polymers have spread rapidly across the globe.
How deep-ocean vents fuel massive phytoplankton blooms
A new study suggests vents in the seafloor may affect life near the ocean's surface and the global carbon cycle more than previously thought.
Adjusting carbon emissions to Paris commitments would prevent heat-related deaths
Thousands of annual heat-related deaths could be potentially avoided in major US cities if global temperatures are limited to the Paris Climate Goals compared with current climate commitments, a new study led by the University of Bristol has found.
Cool, nebulous ring around Milky Way's supermassive black hole
New ALMA observations reveal a never-before-seen disk of cool, interstellar gas wrapped around the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way.
New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.
Surprising enzymes found in giant ocean viruses
A new study led by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Swansea University Medical School furthers our knowledge of viruses -- in the sea and on land -- and their potential to cause life-threatening illnesses.
Metal foam stops .50 caliber rounds as well as steel -- at less than half the weight
Researchers have demonstrated that vehicle armor using composite metal foam (CMF) can stop ball and armor-piercing .50 caliber rounds as well as conventional steel armor, even though it weighs less than half as much.
Study links irregular sleep patterns to metabolic disorders
A new study has found that not sticking to a regular bedtime and wake up schedule -- and getting different amounts of sleep each night -- can put a person at higher risk for obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, high blood sugar and other metabolic disorders.
Weak upper and lower body physical performance associated with depression and anxiety
Physical fitness is associated with a number of key health outcomes, including heart disease, cognition, mortality, and an overall feeling of well-being.
Most-detailed-ever simulations of black hole solve longstanding mystery
An international team has constructed the most detailed, highest resolution simulation of a black hole to date.
Epilepsy drugs during pregnancy linked with later childhood behavioral problems
A new Epilepsia study has uncovered an increased risk of behavioral problems in children of mothers with epilepsy who took common antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy.
Maternal blood test is effective for Down syndrome screening in twin pregnancies
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing, which involves analyzing fetal DNA in a maternal blood sample, is a noninvasive and highly accurate test for Down syndrome in singleton pregnancies, but its effectiveness in twin pregnancies has been unclear.
Foam-free methane storage promoter proposed
Associated petroleum gas is wasted in the billions of cubic meters every year in many countries.
Brighter possibilities for treating blindness
Advances in preclinical research are now being translated into innovative clinical solutions for blindness, a review published in the 10th anniversary series of science Translational Medicine depicts.
Molecular bait can help hydrogels heal wounds
Rice University bioengineers develop modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure.
Augmenting microgrid technology: A new way for reliable power
A group of American and Chinese researchers has designed and tested a microgrid system that is both robust and reliable -- and therefore capable of delivering energy safely and without interruptions.
Predicting post-injury depression and PTSD risk
Addressing the psychological effects of injury can improve health and reduce the negative outcomes of injury.
Analysis: World's protected areas safeguard only a fraction of wildlife
A new analysis published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment shows that the world's protected areas (PAs) are experiencing major shortfalls in staffing and resources and are therefore failing on a massive scale to safeguard wildlife.
Obesity worsens disability in multiple sclerosis
Obesity is an aggravating factor in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the most common form of the disease.
Breathing in black carbon from polluted air linked to alterations in lung blood vessels
Evidence that breathing in tiny particles of black carbon, typically a result of burning diesel, is linked to an increased volume of peripheral, smaller blood vessels in the lungs has been observed for the first time in new research published in the European Respiratory Journal.
Honey bee colonies down by 16%
The number of honey bee colonies fell by 16% in the winter of 2017-18, according to an international study led by the University of Strathclyde.
Details of first historically recorded plague pandemic revealed by ancient genomes
An international team of researchers has analyzed human remains from 21 archaeological sites to learn more about the impact and evolution of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis during the first plague pandemic (541-750 AD).
A new way to block malaria transmission by targeting young contagious parasite forms
Boosting our natural antibody responses against the transmissible parasite stage could hold the key to combatting the malaria parasite and preventing the spread of the disease.
Study: New drug regimens improve outcomes for kidney transplant patients
Preliminary results from a $5.2 million clinical trial led by University of Cincinnati researchers show that the immunosuppressive drug belatacept can help safely and effectively treat kidney transplant patients without the negative long-term side effects of traditional immunosuppressive regimens, the study's leaders announced this week at the annual American Transplant Congress gathering.
Replicating fetal bone growth process could help heal large bone defects
To treat large gaps in long bones, like the femur, which often can result in amputation, researched developed a process in a rodent model that partially recreates the bone growth process that occurs before birth.
Majority of community supports proposed overdose prevention site in Philadelphia
The majority of residents and business owners/staff in Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood support opening an overdose prevention site in their community, according to a study led by researchers at Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health published today in the Journal of Urban Health.
Why deep-sea dragonfish have transparent teeth
Off the coast of San Diego, 500 meters under the sea, pencil-sized sea monsters grin pitch-black smiles because their mouths are filled with transparent teeth.
Biomarker predicts which pancreatic cysts may become cancerous
A multicenter team led by investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Extending sleep may lower cardiometabolic risk
Increasing sleep duration may help reduce cardiometabolic risk -- or the risk of heart disease and metabolic disorders -- in individuals who do not get enough sleep, according to an analysis of all published studies on the topic.
DNA nanorobots target HER2-positive breast cancer cells
According to the Mayo Clinic, about 20% of breast cancers make abnormally high levels of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2).
Microgrids can help maximize efficiency of renewable energy consumption
A group of Italian researchers has developed a method that enables more efficient use of energy by smart homes that are connected to a microgrid -- a web of individualized units that are connected to one another and one common energy source.
Researchers synthesize antimalaria molecules found in a fungus from Nunavut
The solution to the problem of increasing drug resistance among malaria-causing parasites could come from the North, according to a study published in Chemical Communications by researchers from Université Laval and the CHU de Québec Research Centre.
It pays to be free: No-cost products garner strong word-of-mouth recommendations
Consumers who get a web-based product or mobile app for free are more likely to give it a word-of-mouth boost than a product they buy, suggesting they feel 'one good turn deserves another.'
Safe consumption spaces would be welcomed by high-risk opioid users
A large majority of people who use heroin and fentanyl would be willing to use safe consumption spaces where they could obtain sterile syringes and have medical support in case of overdose, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
About faces: geometric style of portrait artwork
A team of computer scientists at the Interdisciplinary Center in Israel have developed an innovative method to automatically analyze artistic portraiture, capturing a high level of detail and accuracy of the portraits as well as the artists' individual style.
New study links childhood abuse with hot flash frequency
Numerous adverse health outcomes have been linked to childhood maltreatment, including mental illness, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality.
Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacks
Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacks Research led by the University of Kent has found that terrorist attacks in Europe don't increase support for populist parties.
Rapamycin retards epigenetic ageing of keratinocytes
Age, as we know it, is clearly an inappropriate measurement because it is based purely on the passing of time, irrespective of biological changes in our body.
Improved human brain organoids to boost neurological disease research
Research led by scientists at Harvard and the Broad Institute has optimized the process of making human brain 'organoids' -- miniature 3D organ models -- so they consistently follow growth patterns observed in the developing human brain.
blu research suggests potential breakthrough in future e-liquid classifications
A new study by Imperial Brands, owners of vape brand blu, suggests that Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD) in-vitro assays can be used to differentiate and classify vape e-liquids, as well as detect allergens potentially present in ingredients.
Brussels scientists developed an AI method to improve rare disease diagnosis
A team of Belgian researchers, led by the ULB-VUB's 'Interuniversity Institute of Bioinformatics' (or IB²) in Brussels, has developed an AI method to identify potential genetic causes of rare diseases, based on computer analysis.
Food freshness sensors could replace 'use-by' dates to cut food waste
Imperial academics have developed low-cost, smartphone-linked, eco-friendly spoilage sensors for meat and fish packaging.
Study shows a decade's increase in education specialists in university science departments
Science professors go through years of training to learn about their field, yet they often don't receive any formal education in how to teach students about it.
Scientists discover how hepatitis C 'ghosts' our immune system
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how the highly infectious and sometimes deadly hepatitis C virus (HCV) 'ghosts' our immune system and remains undiagnosed in many people.
Recreating embryonic conditions at break sites can help bones heal faster
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania have developed a unique technique that uses stem cells and flexible implantable bone-stabilizing plates to help speed the healing of large breaks or defects.
Research reveals a natural pregnancy hormone could relax a locked-up joint
Researchers at Boston University and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center discover surprising step toward melting away 'frozen shoulder.'
Freshwater stingray venom varies according to sex and age
A study by the FAPESP-funded Research, Innovation and Dissemination Center shows that toxins produced by young female stingrays cause more pain, whereas toxins produced by adult stingrays cause tissue necrosis.
New clinical guide helps physicians identify risk, talk with patients about firearm safety and injury
The UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program and colleagues developed a clinical guide to help providers recognize a patient's risk of firearm injury or death, talk with patients about firearm safety and intervene in emergency situations.
Stopping Parkinson's disease before it starts
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide.
Early-life challenges affect how children focus, face the day
Experiences such as poverty, residential instability, or parental divorce or substance abuse, can affect executive function and lead to changes in a child's brain chemistry, muting the effects of stress hormones, according to a new University of Washington study.
Dietary supplements linked with severe health events in children, young adults
Consumption of dietary supplements sold for weight loss, muscle building, and energy was associated with increased risk for severe medical events in children and young adults compared to consumption of vitamins, according to new research led by Harvard T.H.
Tel Aviv University researchers spearhead early detection of Parkinson's disease
New research from Tel Aviv University may lead to the early detection of Parkinson's disease, which can lead to treatment that has the potential to significantly delay the progression of the disease.
To see how invading predators change an ecosystem, watch the prey, say researchers
To study the impacts of invading predators, a Princeton-led team used three lizard species: one curly-tailed predator and two prey species, green and brown anoles.
Research reveals how the Internet may be changing the brain
An international team of researchers from Western Sydney University, Harvard University, Kings College, Oxford University and University of Manchester have found the Internet can produce both acute and sustained alterations in specific areas of cognition, which may reflect changes in the brain, affecting our attentional capacities, memory processes, and social interactions.
Painless skin patch collects fluid for diagnostic testing
Although blood contains a wealth of potential biomarkers of disease, it can be challenging to obtain and analyze.
NTU Singapore scientists uncover binding secret behind protein 'superglue'
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have pinpointed how a special class of plant-derived enzymes, known as peptide ligases, work to join proteins together -- an important process in the development of drugs, for example in specifically attaching a chemotherapy drug to an antibody that recognizes tumor markers to target cancer cells.
Walking speed predicts clinical outcomes in older adults with blood cancers
How slow -- or fast -- older individuals with blood cancers are able to walk four meters (about 13 feet) holds critical information about their overall health and strongly predicts survival and unplanned hospital visits regardless of age, cancer or treatment type, or other factors, according to a new study published today in Blood. The association was strongest in those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
The bacteria building your baby
Australian researchers have laid to rest a longstanding controversy: is the womb sterile?
All human endurance activities share a common metabolic ceiling
In one of the first attempts to quantify the limits of human energy expenditure over time, researchers using data on athletes who competed in global endurance events report that human energy expenditure could not be sustained above 2.5 times the rate of metabolism at rest.
NASA estimates heavy Texas and Louisiana rainfall from gulf weather system
Earlier in the week, NOAA's National Hurricane Center was monitoring a low-pressure system in the Gulf of Campeche that has now moved along the Texas and Louisiana coastlines, bringing heavy rainfall.
Study suggests new computer analytics may solve the hospital readmission puzzle
A University of Maryland School of Medicine study suggests that a novel machine learning model developed at the University of Maryland Medical System, called the Baltimore score (B score), may help hospitals better predict which discharged patients are likely to be readmitted.
New polymer tackles PFAS pollution
toxic polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) pollution -- commonly used in non-stick and protective coatings, lubricants and aviation fire-fighting foams -- can now be removed from the environment thanks to a new low-cost, safe and environmentally friendly polymer.
Medicaid expansion associated with fewer cardiovascular deaths
Expanding Medicaid eligibility was associated with lower rates of death from cardiovascular causes in a study comparing data from counties in 29 states that expanded Medicaid with 19 states that didn't from 2010 to 2016.
Microorganisms on microplastics
A recent study shows that that the potentially toxin-producing plankton species Pfiesteria piscicida prefers to colonize plastic particles, where they are found in 50 times higher densities than in the surrounding water of the Baltic Sea and densities about two to three times higher than on comparable wood particles floating in the water.
A new method for 3D reconstructions of eruptive events on sun
An international team of scientists, led by Skoltech professor Tatiana Podladchikova, has developed a new 3D method for reconstructing space weather phenomena; in particular, the shock waves produced by the Sun's energy outbursts.
Researchers discover what makes deep-sea dragonfish teeth transparent
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego have discovered what's responsible for making the teeth of the deep-sea dragonfish transparent.
Immune cells play unexpected role in early tuberculosis infection
A class of immune cells called innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) mediates the body's initial defense against TB, according to a report published online today in Nature.
Study finds tie between attributing hostile intent and aggression in children and youth
Children who tend to attribute hostile motives to other people are more likely to display aggression, however, the strength of this relationship varies.
Extreme heat to hit one third of the african urban population
Climate change, population growth and urbanisation are instrumental in increasing exposure to extreme temperatures.
Listening to music eases pain and other symptoms in patients with breast cancer
A European Journal of Cancer Care study found that listening to music at home reduced the severity of symptoms, pain intensity, and fatigue experienced by patients with breast cancer.
Autonomous boats can target and latch onto each other
The city of Amsterdam envisions a future where fleets of autonomous boats cruise its many canals to transport goods and people, collect trash, or self-assemble into floating stages and bridges.
Reducing opioid prescriptions after C-sections
There's a better way to take care of patients after C-sections to help them heal faster and manage pain without increasing their risk of long-term opioid use, Michigan Medicine researchers say.
Researchers from IKBFU find out how to strengthen coastal zones of Baltic Sea
Reconstruction and strengthening of coastal zones are the key issues of many industries that are oriented in the seaside tourism.
What if you could spot skin cancer before it got too serious?
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States.
Study compares different strategies for treating insomnia
New research published in Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing indicates that for treating insomnia, stimulus control therapy (which reassociates the bed with sleepiness instead of arousal) and sleep restriction therapy are effective, and it is best to use them individually rather than together.
No assumptions needed to simulate petroleum reservoirs
New research published in EPJ E shows that if the right choices are made when constructing models of petroleum reservoirs, no guesswork is required to calculate the impact of their temperature gradients on their pressure and chemical gradients.
Improving driver safety: A standardized look at distraction monitors
A group of scientists in USA has developed the first-ever standardized method of evaluating commercially available driver-monitoring systems.
Commentary asks: What constitutes beauty and how is it perceived?
Beauty has many facets. Research shows there are many biological, psychological, cultural and social aspects that influence how beauty and attractiveness are perceived.
Smaller city effort to aid chronically homeless can be successful
Los Angeles County has the nation's largest number of unsheltered homeless people, but the problem affects communities in the region differently.
Remaining switched on to silicon-based electronics
It has been assumed that we are approaching the performance limits of silicon-based power electronics.
Pioneering 3D printed device sets new record for efficiency
A new 3-D printed thermoelectric device, which converts heat into electric power with an efficiency factor over 50% higher than the previous best for printed materials -- and is cheap to produce in bulk -- has been manufactured by researchers at Swansea University's SPECIFIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre.
Promising molecule targets protein to offer hope for people with Parkinson's
Results from a study published today looking at a molecule targeting clumps of alpha-synuclein, a key protein linked to Parkinson's, offers hope that it may be possible to slow down or prevent the progression of the condition in humans.
Cardinalfish caught sneaking a bit on the side
Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies reveal the torrid, adulterous love lives of the mouth-brooding cardinalfish.
New study sheds light on how blood vessel damage from high glucose concentrations unfolds
A mechanism in the cells that line our blood vessels that helps them to process glucose becomes uncontrolled in diabetes, and could be linked to the formation of blood clots and inflammation according to researchers from the University of Warwick.
US struggles to keep up as hemp industry grows
US hemp production is soaring, but government oversight hasn't kept up, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Mosquito control program reduces dengue, costs in Sri Lanka
A public health, police, and military partnership to reduce the mosquito population in Sri Lanka resulted in a more than 50% reduction in dengue, as well as cost savings, finds a study from an international team of researchers led by NYU College of Global Public Health.
Unsalted tomato juice may help lower heart disease risk
In a study published in Food Science & Nutrition, drinking unsalted tomato juice lowered blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in Japanese adults at risk of cardiovascular disease.
Alzheimer's therapy may help overcome opioid addiction
Clinical trial results reveal that a medication used to treat Alzheimer's disease may also be an effective therapy for individuals addicted to opioids.
Imaging tests help reveal heart risks in patients with psoriatic disease
Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis -- collectively termed psoriatic disease -- face increased heart risks.
State alcohol policies may affect aggression- and driving-related harms from someone else's drinking
New research published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research suggests that state alcohol policies may be effective in reducing aggression-related and driving-related harms due to other drinkers, mainly in younger adults.
First-ever spider glue genes sequenced, paving way to next biomaterials breakthrough
UMBC's Sarah Stellwagen and Rebecca Renberg at the Army Reserach Lab have determined the first-ever complete sequences of two spider glue genes.
Higher estrogen levels linked to more severe disease in scleroderma
Scleroderma is a connective tissue disease that hardens the skin and scars the organs.
To fight TB infection, early protection is crucial
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Africa Health Research Institute have identified a master cell that coordinates the body's immune defenses in the crucial early days after infection.
Glacial sediments greased the gears of plate tectonics
According to new research, the transition to plate tectonics started with the help of lubricating sediments, scraped by glaciers from the slopes of Earth's first continents.
Study follows the health of older adults with prediabetes problems
In a Journal of Internal Medicine study that followed older adults with prediabetes for 12 years, most remained stable or reverted to normal blood sugar levels, and only one-third developed diabetes or died.
Does weight loss surgery help relieve acid reflux?
Individuals who are obese often experience heartburn and other symptoms of acid reflux.
Change agents: Education specialists a growing force at CSU campuses
An SDSU researcher's study finds science faculty with education specialties are having an increasing impact in K-12 and undergrad science education.
Gall bladder removal may reduce stroke risk in patients with gallstones
Previous research indicates that gallstones are linked with an increased risk of stroke.
Physics could answer questions about breast cancer spreading to bones
To fully understand why breast cancer spreads, or metastasizes, you must also consider the how.
Study examines potential misuse of anti-anxiety medication
There is concern about the misuse of the sedative anti-anxiety medication alprazolam (Xanax) because of the 'high' it can create.
Making a splash is all in the angle
Making a splash depends on the angle of a liquid as it hits and moves along a surface, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
Being overweight as a teen may be associated with cardiomyopathy in adulthood
The risk of developing cardiomyopathy, which often leads to heart failure, increased in adult Swedish men who were even mildly overweight around age 18.
Walking speed points to future clinical outcomes for older patients with blood cancers
Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the VA Boston Healthcare System have uncovered a new vital sign for gauging survival and likelihood of having an unplanned hospitalization in older patients with blood cancers: the speed at which they can walk.
Study sheds light on how cells in the body can sense cancer
Fresh insights into how cells alert the body when they are in danger of becoming cancerous could open new doors in the search for therapies.
Ancient DNA sheds light on Arctic hunter-gatherer migration to North America ~5,000 years ago
New research reveals the profound impact of Arctic hunter-gathers who moved from Siberia to North America about 5,000 years ago on present-day Native Americans.
Jam-packed: A novel microscopic approach to amorphous solids
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have developed a new method for understanding the structure organization of disordered materials fundamentally different from previous geometric approaches of ordered crystals.

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.