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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 07, 2019


NHS-funded private sector hip operations worsening health inequality
Increasing use of the private sector for hip surgery in England driving down NHS provision.
Nurses have an increased risk of sleep disorders and sleep deprivation
According to preliminary results of a new study, there is a high prevalence of insufficient sleep and symptoms of common sleep disorders among medical center nurses.
New core-shell catalyst for ethanol fuel cells
Scientists at Brookhaven Lab and the University of Arkansas have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store liquid fuel that can be generated from renewable resources.
New radiotracer can identify nearly 30 types of cancer
A novel class of radiopharmaceuticals has proven effective in non-invasively identifying nearly 30 types of malignant tumors.
Weight-loss patients at higher risk of death from substance use disorders
The death rate from drug- and alcohol-related causes in people who've had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is nearly triple that of the general public.
Fishers keen to help address the problem of marine litter
Commercial fishers are acutely aware of the potential for marine litter to cause lasting damage to their catches and the wider industry, a new study suggests.
Diabetes can be detected in gut of cats
Diabetes patients show reduced gut bacterial diversity, and now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have learned that the same is true of cats.
Long exposure to protein inhibitor may be key to more effective chemotherapy for cancer
Researchers at SMU's Center for Drug Discovery, Design and Delivery (CD4) have succeeded in lab testing the use of chemotherapy with a specific protein inhibitor so that the chemotherapeutic is better absorbed by drug-resistant cancer cells without harming healthy cells.
High levels of rare gut bacteria may be linked to restless legs syndrome
Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may be more prevalent among patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), according to preliminary findings from a small, new study.
Firearms and risk of suicide by US army soldiers
Examining to what extent firearm ownership and accessibility may be associated with suicide risk among US Army soldiers was the aim of this psychological autopsy study.
The hidden secrets of creating a viral YouTube ad
A new study shows that ads that evoke positive emotions promote sharing, while information and brand prominence hurt sharing.
Dashing the dream of ideal 'invisibility' cloaks for stress waves
Some have dreamt of the perfect cloak to make buildings impervious to stress waves caused by bombs, earthquakes or other calamities.
Fast and furious: detection of powerful winds driven by a supermassive black hole
This is the first publication based entirely on data obtained with EMIR, an instrument developed in the Instituto de AstrofĂ­sica de Canarias (IAC) which analyses the infrared light gathered by the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) from the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (GarafĂ­a, La Palma).
How does the gig economy impact your organization?
SIOP has published a new white paper that explores how to promote gig workers' productivity and well-being in organizations.
How acids behave in ultracold interstellar space
Researchers have investigated how acids interact with water molecules at extremely low temperatures.
The nicotine in e-cigarettes appears to impair mucus clearance
E-cigarette vaping with nicotine appears to hamper mucus clearance from the airways, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Solved: How tides can trigger earthquakes
Some earthquakes along mid-ocean ridges are linked with low tides, but nobody could figure out why.
VA study backs use of physician assistants, nurse practitioners in diabetes care
VA patients with diabetes have similar health outcomes regardless of whether their primary provider is a physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant, according to a Durham VA Health Care System study.
Algorithm provides customized caffeine strategy for alertness
A web-based caffeine optimization tool successfully designs effective strategies to maximize alertness while avoiding excessive caffeine consumption, according to preliminary results from a new study.
Manipulating electron spin using artificial molecular motors
Artificial molecular switches and machines have undergone rapid advances over the past several decades.
Rapidly removing fluid from ICU patients in kidney failure linked to increased death risk
The faster fluid is removed using continuous dialysis from patients with failing kidneys, the higher the likelihood they will die in the next several months.
Study links sleep-disordered breathing to age acceleration
Increasing severity of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption are associated with epigenetic age acceleration, according to preliminary results of a new study.
Researchers see stress and trauma in women's stories about abortion
A University at Buffalo-led research team has used public narratives, an increasingly popular form of person-centered advocacy offering a forum for sharing previously untold stories, to study the undue stress experienced by women in relation to abortion.
Disturbed sleep linked to mental health problems in natural disaster survivors
Preliminary results from a new study suggest that sleep disturbances are associated with mental health problems among survivors of a natural disaster even two years after the event.
U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there.
Insufficient sleep linked to mental health in college students and athletes
Preliminary results from a new study suggest that there is a dose-response relationship between insufficient sleep and mental health symptoms in collegiate students, including varsity athletes.
NIST infrared frequency comb measures biological signatures
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have demonstrated a compact frequency-comb apparatus that rapidly measures the entire infrared band of light to detect biological, chemical and physical properties of matter.
New blood test on horizon for the 1 in 10 children who suffer common liver disease
A new blood test could become clinical practice within five years, reducing the need for a liver biopsy in the management of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), as a major new international pediatric liver registry collaboration yields early results.
How genes interact to build tissues and organisms
A group of scientists at the National Centre for Genomic Analysis (CNAG-CRG) from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), in Barcelona, Spain, led by Holger Heyn, developed a new computational tool, based on the mathematical Graph theory, to infer global, large-scale regulatory networks, from healthy and pathological organs, such as those affected by diabetes or Alzheimer's disease.
Modelling reveals new insight into the electrical conductivity of ionic liquids
New research shows the key role of thermal fluctuations in sustaining the 'relay race' of charges needed to maintain electrical current in room temperature ionic liquids.
Somebody's watching you: The surveillance of self-driving cars
Picture the future. You can hop in your car or one from a ride-share, buckle up and tell the car where you want to go.
Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline
Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows.
Rapid retreat of Arctic coastline revealed in images from the air
Drone surveys have revealed extreme erosion on the Arctic coastline, highlight the ongoing change in the region in a warming climate.
Teens sleep longer, are more alert for homework when school starts later
Preliminary findings from a new study of middle school and high school students suggest that they got more sleep and were less likely to feel too sleepy to do homework after their district changed to later school start times.
NIH-funded trial finds vitamin D does not prevent type 2 diabetes in people at high risk
Taking a daily vitamin D supplement does not prevent type 2 diabetes in adults at high risk, according to results from a study funded by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Autism linked to less empathy in general population -- but that may not be a bad thing
The psychologists behind the research hope their insights can help the autistic community and those around them in adapting support available.
Availability of opioid-overdose antidote at pharmacies
Pennsylvania became one of the first states in 2015 to implement a statewide standing order allowing pharmacists to dispense naloxone, an antidote for opioid overdoses, without a physician's prescription.
Scientists reminded immune cells on what side they should be
International group of scientists in the joint study of the laboratory of the Wistar Institute, University of Pittsburgh and I.M.
Mature galaxy mesmerizes in new Hubble view
NGC 7773 is a beautiful example of a barred spiral galaxy.
One-two-punch catalysts trapping CO2 for cleaner fuels
DGIST researchers are getting closer to developing a material that delivers a one-two punch: recycling atmospheric carbon dioxide for the production of cleaner hydrocarbon fuels.
Scholars investigate how mirror activity works
A team of researchers from Germany and Russia, including Vadim Nikulin from the Higher School of Economics, have demonstrated that long contraction of muscles in one hand increases involuntary reaction of the other one.
Only 1% of social service policies for children include information about healthy sleep
Preliminary results from a new study indicate that a mere 1% of US social service policies impacting children include material regarding healthy sleep education and promotion.
How much would you pay to eliminate child labor from your cocoa?
An increase in cocoa price by 2.8% could potentially eliminate the very worst forms of child labor from cocoa production in Ghana, according to a new economic model described in a study published June 5, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jeff Luckstead and Lawton L.
Tissue engineering: The big picture on growing small intestines
CHLA surgeon Dr. Tracy Grikscheit and colleagues describe how stem cell therapies could help babies with severe intestinal issues.
Older forests resist change -- climate change, that is
Older forests in eastern North America are less vulnerable to climate change than younger forests, particularly for carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity, new research finds.
When social interaction helps you choose your food
How do we choose our food? By studying the neurobiological mechanisms involved in food choices of rodents, neuroscientists (UNIGE) have identified the important and lasting influence that peers can have on eating habits.
Rapid change in coral reefs prompts global calls for a rethink
Coral reef experts from around the world are calling for an urgent re-evaluation of our climate goals in the light of increasing evidence of unprecedented speed of change to these fragile ecosystems.
Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H.
Four new species of plume moths discovered in Bahamas
Deborah Matthews hunts for plume moths in darkness, waiting for the halo of her headlamp to catch a brief flicker.
Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds
A new study published in Nature Communications by a team of researchers from Stockholm University used behavioural data from more than 76,000 dogs, to test the hypothesis that key behaviours in the domestication syndrome are correlated.
Foraging for nitrogen
As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions.
AI tool helps radiologists detect brain aneurysms
Radiologists improved their diagnoses of brain aneurysms with the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by medical experts and computer scientists.
Proof of sandwiched graphene-membrane superstructure opens up a membrane-specific drug delivery mode
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tsinghua University (THU) proved a sandwiched superstructure for graphene oxide (GO) that transport inside cell membranes for the first time.
Researchers warn: junk food could be responsible for the food allergy epidemic
Experts at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition are today presenting the results of a study that show higher levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), found in abundance in junk food, are associated with food allergy in children.
Naloxone access law in Pennsylvania falls short
A new study finds that only one-third of pharmacies in Philadelphia carry naloxone nasal spray, a medication used to rapidly counter the effects of opioid overdose, and that many of the pharmacies that do carry the drug require patients to have a physician's prescription for it.
A molecular glue to overcome cancer drug resistance?
A team led by Duke researchers has discovered a small molecule drug that can stop cancer cells from becoming resistant to chemotherapy.
UNM scientist makes case for stabilizing forest carbon to help mitigate climate change
There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe.

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