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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 09, 2019


Study links poor sleep with poor nutrition
Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep, and many do not consume the recommended amounts of important vitamins and minerals.
The Lancet journals: Papers at American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2019
The following papers will be presented at the ADA conference in San Francisco and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journals.
Sun-exposed oyster mushrooms help patients fight tuberculosis
In a new study, researchers show that sun-exposed oyster mushrooms offer a readily available source of vitamin D that can help TB patients respond better to anti-TB drugs by improving immune response.
Policies encouraging healthy eating could greatly cut cancer-related costs
The foods we eat can play an important role in preventing cancer.
Combination medication helps patients with type 2 diabetes maintain blood sugar goals
Through a randomized, multicenter clinical trial, investigators studied blood glucose results for patients assigned to either take insulin (insulin glargine, IGlar U100) or insulin degludec plus liraglutide (IDegLira), a combination of both insulin and an additional medication to help with blood sugar control.
Improvements in insulin release wane after treatment stops in adults with type 2 diabetes
A set of clinical trials examining youth and adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance has found that disease progression in adults slowed during medical treatment but resumed after treatment stopped.
Large international study finds diabetes drug cuts cardiovascular and kidney problems
A clinical trial that followed more than 9,900 people in 24 countries has found that the drug dulaglutide reduced cardiovascular events and kidney problems in middle-aged and older people with type 2 diabetes.
Do policies targeting sugary drinks pay off?
Drinks with added sugar, also known as sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), are one of the largest sources of added sugar in the American diet and a major contributor to obesity.
New research on diet and supplements during pregnancy and beyond
The foods and nutrients a woman consumes while pregnant have important health implications for her and her baby.
Drug delays type 1 diabetes in people at high risk
A treatment affecting the immune system effectively slowed the progression to clinical type 1 diabetes in high risk individuals, according to findings from National Institutes of Health-funded research.
Night owls can 'retrain' their body clocks to improve mental well-being and performance
A simple tweak to the sleeping patterns of 'night owls' -- people with extreme late sleeping and waking habits -- could lead to significant improvements in sleep/wake timings, improved performance in the mornings, better eating habits and a decrease in depression and stress.
Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered
Scientists believe they have discovered the site of the biggest meteorite impact ever to hit the British Isles.
Cognitive behavioral therapy delivered by telemedicine is effective for insomnia
Preliminary findings from two analyses of an ongoing study suggest that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia delivered by telemedicine is as effective as face-to-face delivery.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
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Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.